Victor Lewis

Local Lore: Putting the ‘Orange’ in ‘Orange County’

There are eight Orange Counties across the United States. Two of the most famous, located in California and Florida, are named for the fruit. But no citrus grows in North Carolina, so what is our Orange County named for? Orange County in North Carolina was founded in 1752, knitted together from parts of Johnston, Bladen and Granville Counties. Christened “Orange County” in honor of William V of Orange, grandson of King George II of Great Britain, whose mother Anne was acting regent of the Dutch Republic. The designation of Orange in young William’s title referred directly to the Dutch...

Read More

Al’s Burger Shack Ranked as ‘Best Burger in America’ by TripAdvisor

Blue Heaven is officially home to the best burger in America, according to TripAdvisor. TripAdvisor is a helpful website and invaluable resource to countless travelers every day. Providing rankings, reservations and recommendations for everything from flights to fancy restaurants; it follows that the friendly folks providing all these helpful tips and tricks would know a thing or two about America’s “best-of” spots. Luckily for Chapel Hill, the best burger in America is right down the road at Al’s Burger Shack. Clocking in ahead of spectacularly named establishments that are stiff competition for “best burger in America” based on name...

Read More

Florence + The Machine / Florence Welch Deep-Dive Mixtape

Florence Leontine Mary Welch, better known as the vocal powerhouse and creative force for Florence + The Machine, has been capturing hearts and enthralling minds since the release of her first studio album. 2009’s “Lungs” saw fantastic success, from radio-friendly smashes like “Dog Days Are Over” and “Kiss With A Fist” to lower-key confessionals that resonated with fans the world over. With three full albums under her belt since then — including the recently-released “High as Hope” — there’s no better time to consider the breadth and depth of music that Welch has released over the past nine years....

Read More

Eating Extremely Local At Blue Dogwood

Blue Dogwood Public Market, located at 306 W. Franklin Street in Chapel Hill, is the first food hall to open in the Triangle — but it will soon be followed by three more: Transfer Co. Food Hall (Raleigh), the Durham Food Hall and Morgan Street Food (Raleigh). After a soft opening trial run and a grand opening last weekend, Blue Dogwood has officially opened its doors to the public. Running Wednesday-Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. with Sunday hours from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Blue Dogwood boasts seven locally based current vendors under one roof — and has...

Read More

Local Lore: Selma Burke & the Art in Your Pocket

The art on American coinage – and currency in general – isn’t a subject that gets much thought from the general public. But someone composed the portraits you see on dollar bills and sculpted the faces you find on the coins collecting in jars at home, and one of those artists was from North Carolina. Selma Burke was born in Mooresville in December of 1900, the daughter of a minister who worked part-time in railroad construction. As a child she allegedly taught herself to sculpt by playing with the white clay on her parents’ farm. She graduated from Winston...

Read More

Tibetan Monks Returning to The ArtsCenter This Week

This week, The ArtsCenter in Carrboro will welcome Tibetan monks into the Nicholson Gallery as they painstakingly construct and subsequently sweep up an elaborate sand mandala over five days. The monks of Drepung Gomang Monastery have been to Carrboro before, and The ArtsCenter’s role in the event is only to act as a host organization and community sponsor. Viewing of the mandala construction is free and open to the public, though donations are gratefully accepted. All money collected, through donation or purchase of goods at the event, is sent directly back to the monastery and helps to house, care...

Read More

Local Lore: The Pit

Anyone who has walked around the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, whether strolling past famous examples of neoclassical architecture or hurrying to class past institutional buildings, has at least heard of The Pit. The unofficial center of UNC and beloved fixture of campus life, where The Pit now sits was once home to the primary athletic field on campus. Emerson field, completed in 1916, was the original home to football, baseball and track events on campus. Carolina’s football program quickly outgrew the field and moved to Kenan Stadium upon its completion in 1927, but...

Read More

Requiem for The Cave

All things come to an end, and the final days of April this year also close the book on more than 50 years of history for Chapel Hill’s oldest bar and music venue. “That bar is a really special, really unique place,” said Sarah Shook, a former bartender at The Cave and bandleader of Sarah Shook & The Disarmers. “As long as I’ve been going there, the friends I’ve made, the memories I’ve made … there’s so much there.” A familiar haunt for up-and-coming bands, local musicians, bar hoppers and college students across the decades, The Cave’s storied underground...

Read More

Local Lore: A Port 200 Miles Upriver

Moncure, North Carolina: founded in 1881, populated by less than 1,000 people in an area under five square miles – and once the westernmost inland port in North Carolina, connected to the sea via 200 miles of water in the form of the Cape Fear River. Before North Carolina was crisscrossed by well over 200,000 miles of public roads, large-scale transport was tricky business. Bulk transportation using railroads and steamships was the most efficient method to transport mail, goods and people over long distances. The first steamship to travel North Carolina’s inland waterways was the Norfolk, named for the...

Read More