Victor Lewis

Flavor of the Week: Cousins Maine Lobster

As wind rises and unexpected rain starts to drizzle out of mostly blue skies, Deb Keller jovially speaks with the people walking up to the Cousins Maine Lobster food truck parked in a Raleigh business center. As she cheerfully shoos customers to wait in their cars and out of the rain while carrying loose trays of food to waiting windows, it becomes clear that this isn’t just another franchise food truck. “We get our produce from the market or someplace local, depending on what we’re doing,” said Keller. “We’re very locally grounded. I’ve been here for 20 years. Our...

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Hometown Hero – Carolyn Walters

This week’s Hometown Hero is Carolyn Walters, co-founder of “100 Women Who Give a Hoot,” a local charitable organization that feels like a small-town social club but donates like a high-class fundraiser. “100 Women Who Give a Hoot” is a group of women, we’re over 250 now, women with big hearts and limited time,” said Walters. “What we do as an organization is we connect women who want to make a difference in the community, who want to give back in the community, with local organizations who need their support financially.” “100 Women Who Give a Hoot” is an...

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Playthrough’s New Game+

Raleigh’s Playthrough Gaming Conference was back for a second year with a vengeance this year in its “New Game+” iteration. “I knew I had to come back,” said con-goer and avid gamer Paul Kirkland. “Last year was pretty small, but it was a lot of fun … When you play with the same people for so long, it’s exciting to have new opponents.” The convention hosted areas dedicated to every form of gaming, from CRT televisions playing out Super Smash Bros. Melee matches to tabletops filled with miniatures battling out mathematically-driven conflicts. A two-day event taking place on Saturday...

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Stoney River Soft Opening Makes a Bang

A new addition to Chapel Hill, Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill is an offshoot of the noted restaurateurs in the J. Alexander Restaurant Group. Located in the seemingly endlessly-improving University Place, Stoney River officially opens its doors today, February 27, at 4 pm. For some lucky patrons, however, the kitchen opened a little early. In an invitation-only soft opening, the Chapel Hill location of Stoney River Steakhouse and Grill welcomed a full dinner crowd on Friday and Saturday night before the official opening on Monday. When the bill arrived at each table, it was with an additional surprise: the...

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Essentials: The LEGO Batman Movie

The LEGO Batman movie doesn’t have the advantage of being unexpectedly wonderful like its 2014 counterpart “The LEGO Movie,” but that doesn’t stop it from being completely, utterly spectacular. When audiences walked into “The LEGO Movie,” most were expecting a children’s movie that reflected current LEGO television and direct-to-video offerings. What moviegoers ended up with was a piece of pop-culture brilliance wrapped in tiny plastic bricks and featuring an engaging all-star voice cast. When “The LEGO Batman Movie” was announced, expectations were rightfully high. Luckily, LEGO Batman was ready to deliver. In a fast-paced movie that falls in line...

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Flavor of the Week: Cholanad

Tucked neatly next to the familiar college town staple “Mellow Mushroom” on Franklin Street is “Cholanad,” a gem of a South Indian restaurant that’s been faithfully proving Chapel Hill with slightly upscale Indian fare for six years and counting. “Franklin Street has a large walking crowd,” said Mathivanan Pothiappan, “Mathi” for short, the owner and manager of Cholanad. “When you open this restaurant somewhere else, even if you have a quality product, you don’t have a walk-in customers. The location is very important for people to come in and taste something different.” Walks-ins certainly are welcome, and even encouraged....

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Essentials: “S.” J.J. Abrams’ Mystery Book

What do you get when J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst decide to write a book together? A head-spinning investigative piece of interactive literary art. For those familiar with unreliable narrators, loose ends and looser interpretations, “S.” has all the hidden-narrative goodies you already expect from the man behind “Lost.” In fact, there’s plenty of similarities to be drawn between “S.” and J.J. Abrams’ body of work. Questions of identity (“Alias”), shades of existentialism (“Lost”) and the blending of genres (“Super 8,” “Cloverfield,” “Star Trek”) all help lend the book a sense of gravity. Abrams’ fascination with found-object storytelling is...

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