Karen Refugees Hoping To See Family Again

Beginning in the mid-1980s, growing violence and political repression in Myanmar (Burma) forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Many of them, mostly of Karen descent, fled to refugee camps in Thailand – and many of them remain there to this day, prohibited from leaving, with limited opportunities to work.

Some, though, have managed to get out of the camps and find homes elsewhere in the world – about 50,000 of them here in the US, according to the State Department. The Chapel Hill-Carrboro community is home to hundreds of Karen residents, refugees and the children of refugees – about a thousand in all. (Some of them lived in Thai refugee camps for more than a decade before finally getting a chance to leave.)

Learn more about Burmese refugee camps at this link…

…and at this link.

But while thousands of people were able to escape Burma and make it out of the refugee camps, hundreds of thousands more remain behind – a dire situation, even as Burma’s politics are slowly improving.

What are the Karen residents in Chapel Hill-Carrboro doing?

Some of them are making plans to go back.

Paw Ray was born in Myanmar and spent ten years in a Thai refugee camp before coming to America. Eh Mu Ra was born in a refugee camp and spent her first years there before her family reached North Carolina. Now Carrboro High School grads, they and their friends are raising money for a trip back to Thailand – and possibly even Myanmar as well – to visit their friends and family that remain overseas. (They’re planning to go sometime in 2018: the political situtation has improved in Myanmar and Thailand, but they know many of their friends and family will still be living in refugee camps two years from now.)

Paw Ray and Eh Mu Ra (joined by Carrboro High School teacher John Hite) shared their story on WCHL with Aaron Keck.

 

If you want to help Paw Ray and Eh Mu Ra, visit this page on GoFundMe.com.

Eh Mu Ra, Paw Ray, and CHS teacher John Hite with WCHL's Aaron Keck. (Photo by Paw Ray.)

Eh Mu Ra, Paw Ray, and CHS teacher John Hite with WCHL’s Aaron Keck. (Photo by Paw Ray.)

http://chapelboro.com/news/international/karen-refugees-hoping-to-see-home-again

Carrboro Jaguars Win 2nd Straight Women’s Soccer Title

The Carrboro Jaguars won the 2A state championship on Saturday for the second time in as many years.

Carrboro knocked off Forbush in the championship game, just as the Jaguars did last season.

The game was scoreless through regulation. Freshman Alexa Wojnovich scored the state title-winning goal with three minutes left in the first overtime period off of a deflection from a corner kick. It was Wojnovich’s 36th goal of the season.

Wojnovich was named the game’s Most Valuable Player.

The Jaguars have now won three state championships in four appearances with titles in 2012, 2015 and 2016.

http://chapelboro.com/featured/carrboro-jaguars-win-2nd-straight-womens-soccer-title

Carrboro High School Students Get A “Sense Of Place”

Chapel Hill and Carrboro pride themselves on being progressive, forward-thinking cities – but they also have a rich history as well.

This year, a group of students at Carrboro High School got to experience that history firsthand – and now, they’re exhibiting the artwork they’ve created to celebrate it.

Melissa Barry is an Exceptional Child teacher at Carrboro High. All year long, she’s been taking her students to historic sites around town – a dozen in all, from Carr Mill Mall to the Morehead Planetarium – so they could hear about our community and see historical artifacts. From those visits, the students created writings and works of art about the special places in our community, as well as the special places in their own lives.

Now, those works of art are on display at one of Chapel Hill’s most historic places, the Horace Williams House on East Rosemary Street.

Melissa Barry and six of her students joined Aaron Keck on WCHL this week.

 

The “Sense of Place” exhibit, with works of art created by the Carrboro High students, will be on display at the Horace Williams House from May 1-27, with an opening reception Sunday, May 1, from 2-4 pm. (The house itself is open Tuesdays through Fridays from 10-4.) Everyone’s invited to come take a look.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-high-school-students-get-a-sense-of-place

Carrboro Wrestler Winning Match Of His Life

The Carrboro High School wrestling team is off to a good start this year. The season is heating up and the state tournament is just around the corner in the start of February.

But take a closer look at those Carrboro wrestlers. On that team, you’ll find one of the most inspiring stories we’ve had the privilege of hearing in a long time.

There’s Dante Veltri. He’s a senior this year at CHS and he’s been been on the wrestling team since he was a freshman. The Veltris are a wrestling family: he and his two brothers David and PJ all started competing when they were toddlers living back in New Jersey.

His coach, DeWitt Driscoll, says Dante’s a pretty special kid. “I think one of the best words is ‘tenacious,’” he says. “He’s one of the most tenacious kids I’ve met. He’s got big goals, he’s got big dreams.”

And last February, wrestling in the 120-pound division, Dante took fourth at the state finals in Greensboro.

Dante Veltri Carrboro Wrestling 4th place state finals

Fittingly, he’s only slightly happy with that finish. (“I really wanted to win,” he says.) But fourth place is big news. A top-four finish at states qualifies you to be able to train at regional training centers – including one at UNC that’s run by Coleman Scott, who won a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics. “Dante can go once or twice a week and train with an Olympic medalist,” says Driscoll.

But that is not why you’re going to remember Dante Veltri.

This is.

“I noticed, like, a lump one day. It was really sore.”

The lump was under his arm. It was the fall of 2013. Dante had just begun his sophomore year.

“We went to the doctor to see what it was; they put me on medicine, antibiotics for a couple weeks,” he says. “I didn’t think anything of it, other than it was keeping me off the mat.”

But when the swelling didn’t go away, doctors recommended a biopsy – and the news wasn’t good.

Karen Veltri is Dante’s mother. “The biopsy was October 15,” she says. “And on October 17” – she remembers the date – “they called me at work.”

Dante was only 15 years old. He’d been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“And I had to go pick him up from school and bring him home,” Karen says, “and tell him he had cancer.”

Listen to Part 1 of WCHL’s story on Dante Veltri.

 

True to form, Karen says when she broke the news, Dante’s first question was:

“What about wrestling?”

“I told him we’re not going to be wrestling for a while,” she says. “We have a much bigger match right now.”

Over at Carrboro High School, DeWitt Driscoll says he’d been worried ever since he first saw the lump on Dante’s arm – but it was still hard news to take.

“It threw me backwards, you know,” he says. “Especially when you have a kid like Dante, that I’ve been so close with for so long – emotionally it was really hard to hold it together.”

But with cancer treatments looming and his wrestling career possibly over, Dante Veltri did what he always did: he got to work.

“Right after I heard, I was upset, I didn’t really want to talk to people,” he says. “And then after like 10 minutes, I just wanted to figure out the plan.”

Dante Veltri received his cancer diagnosis on October 17, 2013. His mom Karen says the treatment began immediately.

“He took everything,” she says. “You don’t know what’s coming at you. Biopsies, scans – they drilled into his hips to check and make sure it wasn’t in his bone marrow. They did a lot of invasive things, and he just took it all in stride.”

Between October of 2013 and January of 2014, Dante went through five rounds of chemo at UNC Hospitals, each lasting several days. Karen Veltri says the last round lasted more than 160 hours.

“Through it all, he was amazing,” she says. “He figured out that walking the hospital floor 16 rounds was a mile, so he would get out there and do that. He stayed active. He went to school, he kept up his grades…

“You know, the treatment is pretty brutal. It not only kills the cancer cells, it just attacks everything…but he did whatever was asked of him and never complained. It wasn’t easy, believe me. Watching him was not easy. But I’m proud of him. He did great.”

While Karen Veltri watched her son go through the biggest fight of his life, through it all, Dante kept his focus.

“I didn’t think much of it,” he says. “The whole time I just wanted to get back to a normal life, get back on the mat.”

Listen to Part 2 of WCHL’s story on Dante Veltri.

 

And in January, after that grueling fifth round of chemo, a PET scan showed Dante was all clear. Three months later, he was cleared to wrestle again – and coach DeWitt Driscoll says that first practice back was special.

“We were at a club facility we go to in Hillsborough,” he says. “It’s kind of an old, dingy beat-up place and it usually has kind of a dark aura to it, because there’s so much darkness in there…but that day, man, I just remember it was bright.”

Dante’s doctor told him it would likely be about a year until he was back to normal, but Driscoll says his wrestler was close to 100 percent after only two months. Of course Dante would have to wait into the later fall for the start of the wrestling season – but in the meantime, he was happy just being a normal kid again.

“Not playing keep-up all year, like in sophomore year, was huge,” he says. “My grades (were) amazing, (and) being on the mat the whole year – it was awesome.”

And when the wrestling season finally began – even after a year of missed practices and biopsies and tests and week-long chemo treatments – it quickly became clear that Dante Veltri hadn’t missed a beat.

And his mom Karen was there every step of the way – all the way to Greensboro, for the state finals last February.

“I’m on the bleachers every match,” she says. (Dante corroborates: “I could hear her from all the way down on the mat in that huge Greensboro Coliseum.”)

He’d faced five rounds of chemo, and in Greensboro he faced five opponents. “It was pretty intense,” says Karen. “One of his matches he wrestled somebody that every time during the season he had beat him, and then it turned into a nailbiter at states, where you’re just shaking because you’re thinking, oh my gosh, he’s never lost to this kid, what’s going on? And then he won.”

Dante Veltri Carrboro wrestling

And when it was all over, Dante Veltri, barely a year removed from intensive cancer treatments, had finished fourth in the state.

“The year before that, he was still dealing with scars on his chest (and) his hair was still all missing,” says Driscoll. “Just to think back to where he was a year prior to being on the podium at states…

“Most people would say he came a long way, but he doesn’t see it that way. He just took the next step in his life.”

Now? Dante Veltri is a senior at Carrboro High School. He’s still on the wrestling team, hoping for even bigger and better results. His fight back from cancer has won statewide recognition: last year, the North Carolina High School Athletics Association honored Dante with the A.J. “Tony” Simeon Courage Award. But for now his goals are pretty straightforward.

“I want to get straight As in school,” he says. “And win my first state title.”

January 8 marked two years since his last chemo treatment. On that day, he pinned his opponent on the wrestling mat to claim his 100th career victory – a significant milestone, even for a wrestler who hadn’t missed an entire season of competition.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

But that’s still not the end of the story – because this isn’t only about one family and one kid. It’s about our community as well.

And while Dante Veltri was in the hospital, his mom Karen says the community came through with incredible support.

“The amount of support that poured out of Carrboro High School, his athletic director, the doctors, the nurses…I can’t even believe how much they did,” she says. “Baskets of stuff would come from school for him with his favorite foods or gift cards…just the amount of support, it was really overwhelming.”

Carrboro High School athletic director April Ross even organized a 5K to raise funds for Dante’s treatment – and now, there are plans to keep that 5K going annually, to raise funds no longer for one family, but for UNC’s entire department of pediatric oncology.

And Karen Veltri went even further. She organized an initiative called “Take Down Cancer” – collecting not money but board games, 100 board games last year alone, to give to kids fighting cancer at UNC Hospitals.

“Being there so much, you’d see these little kids, they’re 4, 5, 6 years old and they don’t know what’s going on, and all of them have a smile on their face most of the time,” she says. “And so we just decided that we were going to do this game drive, and his whole team jumped right on board.”

It’s been more than two years since Dante Veltri was diagnosed with cancer. Today, he’s cancer-free, back on the mat, preparing for a run at a state title, his coach DeWitt Driscoll cheering him on.

“The silver lining from it may be that he gained a little more perspective,” Driscoll says. “Just being on the mat competing is what the fun of it is. The rest is just gravy, whether you’re winning or not.”

The Veltris are still a long way removed from New Jersey – but for Dante’s mom Karen, Chapel Hill is home now, in a way it hadn’t been before.

“When I first moved down here, I kind of felt guilty, taking my kids away from family and friends,” she says. “And it’s kind of strange that it took a cancer diagnosis for me to realize – we are exactly where we need to be. I don’t know that we would have got that (support) anywhere else.”

And as for the teen at the center of it all?

I asked Dante Veltri what he’s learned from this whole experience.

“Don’t give up,” he says. “Even if the odds are against you, don’t give up. Anything is possible.”

His mom Karen, standing by his side, agrees.

“You know, there is light at the end of the tunnel,” she says. “There’s help out there. There’s people that care. Just keep pushing. Keep trudging forward.

“You’ll get where you need to be.”

To learn more about the Take Down Cancer drive, or about how you can donate to the UNC Pediatric Oncology clinic, email Karen Veltri at TakeDownCancer2@gmail.com.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-wrestler-winning-match-of-his-life

Carrboro Student Still Helping After Graduation

There’s a student project at Carrboro High School that’s been ongoing for several years. Already it’s produced beautiful murals on the walls at CHS…and it’s helped an impoverished community in the Dominican Republic gain better access to clean water.

And even after all that, the work is still ongoing.

CHS grad Leah Simon and teacher John Hite have spearheaded the project (though they’re quick to point out that many other people have been involved too). It began with a mural project: two artists from the Dominican Republic came to CHS to paint two murals with the assistance of students, parents and staff. In response, Simon and Hite led an effort to raise money to proivde running water to the muralists’ community, La Cumbre. Tens of thousands of dollars later, that project is now under way. (Leah Simon is now taking her pre-college gap year to volunteer in the DR.)

With the water project up and running, Simon and Hite are turning their attention to another need: Simon’s now raising money for a community center in Tenares, a city in the north central Dominican Republic.

Leah Simon and John Hite joined Aaron Keck on WCHL last week.

 

If you’d like to contribute to the Tenares project, visit this link.

http://chapelboro.com/featured/carrboro-student-still-helping-after-graduation

Carrboro Wrestler Winning Match Of His Life

The Carrboro High School wrestling team is on the rise. The Jaguars took a big group to states in Greensboro this February and they’re looking forward to bigger and better things next season.

But take a closer look at those Carrboro wrestlers. On that team, you’ll find one of the most inspiring stories we’ve had the privilege of hearing in a long time.

There’s Dante Veltri, just wrapping up his junior year at CHS. He’s been on the team since he was a freshman. The Veltris are a wrestling family: he and his two brothers David and PJ all started competing when they were toddlers living back in New Jersey.

His coach, DeWitt Driscoll, says Dante’s a pretty special kid. “I think one of the best words is ‘tenacious,’” he says. “He’s one of the most tenacious kids I’ve met. He’s got big goals, he’s got big dreams.”

And back in February, wrestling in the 120-pound division, Dante took fourth at the state finals in Greensboro.

Dante Veltri Carrboro Wrestling 4th place state finals

 

Fittingly, he’s only slightly happy with that finish. (“I really wanted to win,” he says.) But fourth place is big news. A top-four finish at states qualifies you to be able to train at regional training centers – including one at UNC that’s run by Coleman Scott, who won a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics. “Dante can go once or twice a week and train with an Olympic medalist,” says Driscoll.

But that is not why you’re going to remember Dante Veltri.

This is.

“I noticed, like, a lump one day. It was really sore.”

The lump was under his arm. It was the fall of 2013. Dante had just begun his sophomore year.

“We went to the doctor to see what it was; they put me on medicine, antibiotics for a couple weeks,” he says. “I didn’t think anything of it, other than it was keeping me off the mat.”

But when the swelling didn’t go away, doctors recommended a biopsy – and the news wasn’t good.

Karen Veltri is Dante’s mother. “The biopsy was October 15,” she says. “And on October 17” – she remembers the date – “they called me at work.”

Dante was only 15 years old. He’d been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“And I had to go pick him up from school and bring him home,” Karen says, “and tell him he had cancer.”

True to form, Karen says when she broke the news, Dante’s first question was:

“What about wrestling?”

“I told him we’re not going to be wrestling for a while,” she says. “We have a much bigger match right now.”

Over at Carrboro High School, DeWitt Driscoll says he’d been worried ever since he first saw the lump on Dante’s arm – but it was still hard news to take.

“It threw me backwards, you know,” he says. “Especially when you have a kid like Dante, that I’ve been so close with for so long – emotionally it was really hard to hold it together.”

But with cancer treatments looming and his wrestling career possibly over, Dante Veltri did what he always did: he got to work.
“Right after I heard, I was upset, I didn’t really want to talk to people,” he says. “And then after like 10 minutes, I just wanted to figure out the plan.”

Dante Veltri received his cancer diagnosis on October 17, 2013. His mom Karen says the treatment began immediately.

“He took everything,” she says. “You don’t know what’s coming at you. Biopsies, scans – they drilled into his hips to check and make sure it wasn’t in his bone marrow. They did a lot of invasive things, and he just took it all in stride.”

Between October of 2013 and January of 2014, Dante went through five rounds of chemo at UNC Hospitals, each lasting several days. Karen Veltri says the last round lasted more than 160 hours.

“Through it all, he was amazing,” she says. “He figured out that walking the hospital floor 16 rounds was a mile, so he would get out there and do that. He stayed active. He went to school, he kept up his grades…

“You know, the treatment is pretty brutal. It not only kills the cancer cells, it just attacks everything…but he did whatever was asked of him and never complained. It wasn’t easy, believe me. Watching him was not easy. But I’m proud of him. He did great.”

While Karen Veltri watched her son go through the biggest fight of his life, through it all, Dante kept his focus.

“I didn’t think much of it,” he says. “The whole time I just wanted to get back to a normal life, get back on the mat.”

And in January, after that grueling fifth round of chemo, a PET scan showed Dante was all clear. Three months later, he was cleared to wrestle again – and coach DeWitt Driscoll says that first practice back was special.

“We were at a club facility we go to in Hillsborough,” he says. “It’s kind of an old, dingy beat-up place and it usually has kind of a dark aura to it, because there’s so much darkness in there…but that day, man, I just remember it was bright.”

Dante’s doctor told him it would likely be about a year until he was back to normal, but Driscoll says his wrestler was close to 100 percent after only two months. Of course Dante would have to wait into the later fall for the start of the wrestling season – but in the meantime, he was happy just being a normal kid again.

“Not playing keep-up all year, like (in) sophomore year, was huge,” he says. “My grades have been amazing, (and) being on the mat the whole year – it was awesome.”

And when the wrestling season finally began – even after a year of missed practices and biopsies and tests and week-long chemo treatments – it quickly became clear that Dante Veltri hadn’t missed a beat.

And his mom Karen was there every step of the way – all the way to Greensboro, for the state finals in February.

“I’m on the bleachers every match,” she says. (Dante corroborates: “I could hear her from all the way down on the mat in that huge Greensboro Coliseum.”)

He’d faced five rounds of chemo, and in Greensboro he faced five opponents. “It was pretty intense,” says Karen. “One of his matches he wrestled somebody that every time during the season he had beat him, and then it turned into a nailbiter at states, where you’re just shaking because you’re thinking, oh my gosh, he’s never lost to this kid, what’s going on? And then he won.”

Dante Veltri Carrboro wrestling

 

And when it was all over, Dante Veltri, barely a year removed from intensive cancer treatments, had finished fourth in the state.

“The year before that, he was still dealing with scars on his chest (and) his hair was still all missing,” says Driscoll. “Just to think back to where he was a year prior to being on the podium at states…

“Most people would say he came a long way, but he doesn’t see it that way. He just took the next step in his life.”

Now? Dante Veltri is about to be a senior at Carrboro High School. He’s still on the wrestling team, hoping for even bigger and better results. His fight back from cancer has won statewide recognition: earlier this year, the North Carolina High School Athletics Association honored Dante with the A.J. “Tony” Simeon Courage Award. But for now his goals are pretty straightforward.

“I want to get straight As in school,” he says. “And win my first state title.”

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

 

But that’s still not the end of the story – because this isn’t only about one family and one kid. It’s about our community as well.

And while Dante Veltri was in the hospital, his mom Karen says the community came through with incredible support.

“The amount of support that poured out of Carrboro High School, his athletic director, the doctors, the nurses…I can’t even believe how much they did,” she says. “Baskets of stuff would come from school for him with his favorite foods or gift cards…just the amount of support, it was really overwhelming.”

Carrboro High School athletic director April Ross even organized a 5K to raise funds for Dante’s treatment – and now, there are plans to keep that 5K going annually, to raise funds no longer for one family, but for UNC’s entire department of pediatric oncology.

And Karen Veltri went even further. She organized an initiative called “Take Down Cancer” – collecting not money but board games, to give to kids fighting cancer at UNC Hospitals.

“Being there so much, you’d see these little kids, they’re 4, 5, 6 years old and they don’t know what’s going on, and all of them have a smile on their face most of the time,” she says. “And so we just decided that we were going to do this game drive, and his whole team jumped right on board.”

It’s been two years since Dante Veltri was diagnosed with cancer. Today, he’s cancer-free, back on the mat, preparing for a run at a state title, his coach DeWitt Driscoll cheering him on.

“The silver lining from it may be that he gained a little more perspective,” Driscoll says. “Just being on the mat competing is what the fun of it is. The rest is just gravy, whether you’re winning or not.”

The Veltris are still a long way removed from New Jersey – but for Dante’s mom Karen, Chapel Hill is home now, in a way it hadn’t been before.

“When I first moved down here, I kind of felt guilty, taking my kids away from family and friends,” she says. “And it’s kind of strange that it took a cancer diagnosis for me to realize – we are exactly where we need to be. I don’t know that we would have got that (support) anywhere else.”

And as for the teen at the center of it all?

I asked Dante Veltri what he’s learned from this whole experience.

“Don’t give up,” he says. “Even if the odds are against you, don’t give up. Anything is possible.”

His mom Karen, standing by his side, agrees.

“You know, there is light at the end of the tunnel,” she says. “There’s help out there. There’s people that care. Just keep pushing. Keep trudging forward.

“You’ll get where you need to be.”

To learn more about the Take Down Cancer drive, or about how you can donate to the UNC Pediatric Oncology clinic, email Karen Veltri at TakeDownCancer2@gmail.com.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-wrestler-winning-fight-for-his-life

Carrboro Students Talk Development, Aid In NYC

Last week, Carrboro High School teacher Matt Cone led a group of students to New York City for a three-day visit to discuss global aid and development with some of the world’s leading experts.

The students were from Carrboro’s Global Health Club. The trip was organized in conjunction with Pope Francis’ visit to New York, but also in conjunction with the Global Citizen Festival, which brought leading development experts together from around the world. (Bono, Michelle Obama, Malala Yousafzai, and Beyonce were also on hand.)

From Thursday through Saturday, the students met with about a dozen experts, including author William Easterly and Wagner School of Public Service professor Sonia Ospina, discussing a variety of approaches to global development from microloans to national aid programs.

Matt Cone and students Hope Anderson and Lucia Lozano-Robledo stopped by WCHL on Thursday and shared their experiences with Aaron Keck.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-students-talk-development-aid-in-nyc

High School Football Preview: Week 3

This week WCHL will be at Chapel Hill High School cover the game between CHHS and Carrboro. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 o’clock.

Last year Chapel Hill beat Carrboro 41-19.

The Tigers got their first win of the season last week against South Granville 46-29. They were led by QB Conner Stough, who showed off his legs as well as his arm. He threw three touchdown passes and ran for another.

Carrboro is coming off of a close loss to East Chapel Hill last week 30-27. The Jaguars are looking to build off the momentum RB Greyson Magee built; the senior ran for 165 yards and four touchdowns. Despite his strong performance, the Jaguars still fell to 0-2 on the season.

Make sure to tune into WCHL for coverage of the game this weekend.

In other action, Orange travels to Riverside and Northwood travels to Jordan Matthews. Cedar Ridge knocked off East Chapel Hill on Thursday night 29-6.

http://chapelboro.com/sports/high-school/high-school-football-preview-week-3

Carrboro Students Raising Money For Dominican Republic

For the last two years, students at Carrboro High School have traveled to the Dominican Republic to paint murals.

This year, a pair of Dominican muralists came to Carrboro and returned the favor – and now, Carrboro students are readying for a public unveiling ceremony that will double as a fundraiser for Dominican communities that lack running water.

Carrboro senior Leah Simon and teacher John Hite spearheaded the project. Simon has traveled to the DR each of the last two summers with the organization Transcending Borders; she and Hite worked together with the Global Leadership Institute to bring the Dominican artists to Carrboro this year. They produced two murals – one representing “the now” and one representing “a hopeful future.”

Those artists hail from the La Cumbre region of the DR – a region where many families lack running water and have to travel significant distances to obtain water, either on foot or by mule, several times a day. Simon and Hite say the Carrboro High community is committed to raising funds to address that serious issue.

John Hite and Leah Simon.

John Hite and Leah Simon.

On Tuesday, May 26, Carrboro High will host a public unveiling ceremony from 6-8 pm for the school’s two new murals. Everyone is invited. There will also be food, music – and a silent auction to raise funds to help La Cumbre families get better access to water.

Hite and Simon say they’re hoping to raise a total of $15,000 for the cause; they’ve already raised about $10,000 through their various fundraising efforts.

John Hite and Leah Simon joined Aaron Keck on WCHL this week:

To learn more about the “Dominican Republic Water Project” and make a donation online, click here.

To learn more about Carrboro High’s fundraising efforts for La Cumbre, click here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-students-raising-money-for-dominican-republic

Carrboro HS Students Help Meals On Wheels

Carrboro High School students with moderate disabilities have been partnering with Meals on Wheels to help improve the quality of life for Chapel Hill residents.

Every month, the students head to Binkley Baptist Church and work with Meals on Wheels to bag up to 150 packages of food donated from PORCH; the food is then distributed to Orange County residents in need.

Carrboro High teacher Melissa Barry stopped by WCHL and spoke with Aaron Keck, along with six of the students: Zoe Kofodimos, Brittany Newby, Aaron Persons, Heather Porter, Lucia Maria Romano, and Max Van Name.

 

For more on how you can help Chapel Hill-Carrboro Meals on Wheels, visit www.chcmow.org.

Carrboro High students visiting Meals on Wheels 2

The students (and Barry) speak with Aaron Keck on WCHL.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-hs-students-help-meals-wheels