Vote For Polticians Who Want People to Vote

I don’t know about you, but I am always losing things.  My car keys, my phone, the TV remote.  It always feels great to find these things again.  I try to set up my house and habits so I don’t lose things again.

But, all of us have lost something precious and that’s the opportunity, and possibly the right, to vote.

Back in 2013, your North Carolina General Assembly and your governor passed a restrictive new voting law that makes it harder for some people to vote and impossible for others.  The law cut a week out of early voting, ended same-day registration, started an un-needed ID requirement, and ended a very good pre-registration program for young people.

They didn’t offer any viable reasons for doing so we’re left to assume that they’re afraid of people voting.  Some good friends and neighbors like the League of Women Voters and the NAACP felt this was unfair and took the law to court.

So, I don’t know about you, but I sure don’t want to lose my right or opportunity to vote.  But, I do want to make sure that our governor and those legislators who passed this law lose something, too.

Their elected seats.

Even though it will be harder to do so, I’ll be sure to vote next time for politicians who want people to vote.

— Brian Thornburg

http://chapelboro.com/columns/the-commentators/vote-for-politicians-who-want-people-to-vote

Remember Your Voter ID! But Why?

The 2016 primary election is the first in North Carolina where you’ll be required to show a valid ID in order to vote. (You can vote without one if there’s a “reasonable impediment” preventing you from obtaining one, but you’ll have to go through some red tape if that’s the case.)

Legislators say the voter-ID provision is designed to prevent voter fraud, and there’s something to be said for having safeguards in place. But is the cure worse than the disease? There have only been a handful of cases in North Carolina where an individual has tried passing themselves off as somebody else in order to vote – only two cases this century, in fact, out of about 35 million votes cast.

And the voter ID provision will make it demonstrably more difficult for many North Carolinians to vote. How many? Perhaps as many as half a million, a disproportionate number of which are black, female, and either young or elderly. Evidence is still unclear on the specific effect of voter ID laws on turnout, but there’s growing evidence that it does have a negative effect. (This in turn tends to benefit Republican candidates, and voter ID opponents argue that that’s the whole purpose of the law in the first place.)

More information on voter ID and turnout here

….and a lot more here.

So what should North Carolina do, when it comes to voting and voting restrictions? Orange County conservative Ashley DeSena and WCHL’s Aaron Keck (a progressive) discussed the issue on the air this week. (Both are skeptical of voter ID. Keck likes Oregon’s law that automatically registers you to vote when you turn 18, without your having to do anything; DeSena goes further, wondering why ‘registration’ is even necessary in the first place.)

Listen to their conversation.

http://chapelboro.com/featured/remember-your-voter-id-but-why

Be Prepared For Voter ID Issues at the Polls

Well here we are a week into our early voting and less than a week before our primary and I am glad to tell you I have voted.

For those of you that have not voted here is a little advice. Pack a lunch if you are going to wait until March 15 to vote. We are now required to bring a photo ID and present it to the volunteers who will be working the polls. Please make sure your address matches.

This will be a small inconvenience for you, but think of the voters standing in line. How many will be questioned behind you?

Well my addresses matched, the worker looked up from my photo ID and said “well that’s you” and placed it on her computer then asked me my last name. That’s right she had my information from my state issued driver license and still asked me who I was. I pointed to my ID that I was required to provide to vote and ask her why I have to give my name. She produced a book on the desk and informed me that it was the law the General Assembly required her to ask and she had to ask everybody their name and address even after receiving the photo ID.

I was told “Because someone could come in with a fake ID claiming to be you and use your address so you have to prove who you claimed to be.”

The book was about an inch thick and must have covered many more questions than mine. Now this did take more time because I asked several questions, but the main reason is to drag out the process and have voters standing in longer lines in fewer places and most will just give up and walk away.

Be prepared before you vote, go to the state board of election web site, check your name, address and where you vote. If they don’t match or if you have registered wrong, take proof of your address. The website will tell you what will be accepted. Have a sample ballot filled out so you will know where the candidates are located that you wish to vote for.

Don’t get mad, JUST VOTE.

— Wiley Post

http://chapelboro.com/columns/the-commentators/be-prepared-for-voter-id-issues-at-the-polls

John Oliver Rips North Carolina Voting Laws

North Carolina voting laws, and similar ones around the country, were the subject of scathing criticism Sunday night.

John Oliver took aim on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight.

A string of states, including North Carolina, have passed controversial voter ID laws over past few years.  Oliver specifically cited data from North Carolina, including a claim that over 300,000 voters in North Carolina do not have valid IDs.

The piece also features a clip from former Rep. Tom Murry.  Back in 2013, when he was a member of the General Assembly, Murry said the new law, “isn’t going to impact a significant amount of North Carolinians.”

Oliver replies:

“By that standard, you could also say, ‘We’re going to incinerate everyone named Warren.’  That’s not a ‘significant number of people.’  But, you are going to have a pretty justifiably upset Warren Beatty on your hands.”

Murry lost a reelection bid in 2014.  He now works as a lobbyist for the state’s court system.

John Oliver made several interesting analogies throughout the piece.

“Voter ID is a problem the way deadly knife play from crabs is a problem,” Oliver said. “I’m not saying it doesn’t exist, there are cases where it has happened, but let’s not overreact to one stabby crab.”

Watch it here. Note:  There is strong “HBO” language.

 

http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/john-oliver-rips-north-carolina-voting-laws

Orange County Prepares for New Voter ID Law

Voters in North Carolina will be required to show a picture ID at the polls for the upcoming primary election.

If voters do not have a photo ID, they will be allowed to cast a provisional ballot if they claim a reasonable impediment prevented them from acquiring accepted identification.

Opponents of the voter ID law were in court on Monday on grounds that it discriminates against minorities.

Tracy Reams, Director of the Orange County Board of Elections, said she and her staff have been preparing for the changing requirements.

“The main difference is really the photo ID, people being required to show that and for people who don’t have that ID can go to the DMV and get a free voter ID card,” said Reams.

There are two exceptions, those who wish to submit an absentee ballot and those who are physically unable to vote in person.

But Reams said she doesn’t believe the photo ID laws will affect voter turnout in Orange County.

“From the information I’ve gotten from the state board, there are very few in our county that have indicated that they do not have a photo ID,” said Reams.

That might have been due to the efforts of election officials in the past.

“For the last two years we have been asking voters when they come to vote, you know in 2016 you may need to show a photo ID, do you have what you need?” said Reams.

If voters responded that they did not have a proper ID, the state then sent a letter offering them assistance to obtain one.

“And what they’ve gotten back is a very low number of those saying they do not have ID,” said Reams.

In March, voters will have a chance to pick their party’s representative for President and Governor for elections in November, as well as weigh in on local races.

During the early voting period, voters can still register during the same day they cast their ballots but same-day registration is not allowed on the day of the actual primary.

Where you can cast your ballot has also changed. Last year out of precinct voting was not allowed.

“Well that has changed again,” said Reams. “So right now we are carrying forward with if you vote out of precinct the ballot will count but it will only count for those contest for which you would have been eligible to vote for, if you had voted in your correct precinct.”

The registration deadline for the March 15 primary is February 19.

Early voting will take place March 3- March 12.

http://chapelboro.com/featured/orange-county-prepares-for-new-voter-id

Judge To Weigh Trial Schedule On NC Voting Changes

WINSTON-SALEM — A federal judge is scheduled to hear arguments over whether a trial on the legality of recent Republican-backed changes to North Carolina’s voting laws should be held before or after the November 2014 elections.

A hearing is scheduled for Thursday in Winston-Salem.

Gov. Pat McCrory faces a battery of lawsuits filed by the U.S. Justice Department, the state chapter of the NAACP and other groups who want the case heard before the election in the hopes of dismantling changes that include cutting the early voting period by a week and increasing access for partisan poll watchers. Also at issue is a new requirement for voters to present government-issued photo ID starting in 2016.

Lawyers for McCrory and GOP legislators say it will take them at least a year to prepare.

http://chapelboro.com/news/state-government/judge-weigh-trial-schedule-nc-voting-changes

New Vote Reform Law Unpopular In NC

RALEIGH – As our state becomes the 34th state in the union to require I.D. for be able to vote, Public Policy Polling found that the new law is unpopular among voters.

According to the poll, 39 percent of North Carolinians support the voting reform bill signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory on Monday while 59 percent oppose.

Tom Jensen, director of PPP, says that voter I.D. requirements themselves are actually popular in North Carolina, but the bill became unpopular as other provisions were added, such as an end to straight ticket voting and shortening the early voting period from 17 to 10 days.

“We found that only 33 percent of voters in the state thought that it was a good idea to cut the early voting period by a week,” Jensen says. “59 percent were opposed to that.”

Tracy Reams, Orange County Board of Elections director, says that early voting is used by voters in the county in the 2012 November election.

“We had a total of 50,233 ballots that were cast during the early voting period,” Reams says.

In a January 2011 poll by PPP, Jensen says 66 percent of North Carolinians supported just the idea of requiring voters to show I.D.

“This is one of the few things that the Republicans wanted to do that really was popular,” Jensen says. “They managed to make it unpopular by adding all of this extra stuff.”

The elimination of straight-ticket voting in the voting reform bill was also unpopular with voters. Disapproval ran among both parties, with 68 percent of Republicans and 70 percent of Democrats opposing the move.

Jensen says that Republicans in the General Assembly got rid off straight-ticket voting because Democrats are more likely to use it.

“I think the Republicans think that if they get rid of that, they’ll have a better chance of winning some of those down-ballot offices like insurance commissioner, secretary of state, those kinds of things,” Jensen says.

Jensen says the move to pass a bill with added unpopular provisions is something the Republican General Assembly has been doing since Gov. McCrory’s election.

“I think it’s a situation where Republicans really felt like, ‘we have this super majority in both the House and Senate, we have a Republican governor. We can really do pretty much whatever we want without having to worry about how popular it is,’” Jensen says.

Among the other items in the new voting reform law is that voters who show up at the wrong precinct are no longer given a provisional ballot so they can vote properly even at that location.

Reams says this was also utilized in the previous election.

“For the November general election in 2012, we had 34 provisional ballots that were cast due to voting out of precinct,” Reams says.

The law also prevents precincts from extending the time that they are open on Election Day, due to long lines or other errors. Reams says no precincts in Orange County extended their hours in the 2012 election.

Senator Kay Hagan sent a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder on Tuesday asking him to review the voting reform law.

http://chapelboro.com/news/state-government/new-vote-reform-law-unpopular-in-nc

Voter ID Bill Signed Into Law

RALEIGH –Governor Pat McCrory signed the General Assembly’s Voter I.D. bill into law on Monday, making us the 34th state to require identification to vote.

The bill requires a form of government-issued photo I.D. to be able to vote, not including student I.D. or out-of-state driver’s licenses.

As a part of the Voter I.D. bill, North Carolinians can no longer register on Election Day, early voting periods are limited from 17 days to 10 days and 16- and 17-year-olds who would be eligible to vote on Election Day are not allowed to pre-register. The bill also eliminates early voting on Sundays. Voters must give any updates about change of address or other changes at least 25 days in advance of Election Day.

The time polls can stay open can no longer be extended, even if there are long lines that will prevent everyone from getting a chance to vote.

Political parties are now allowed to send ten observers to different voting precincts to monitor voting on Election Day and gives citizens the authority to challenge the legality of someone else’s voting if they live in the same county.

Straight-ticket voting, which allows a voter to check a box saying they are voting for all of the Republican or all of the Democratic candidates on a ballot, is now gone as well. Voters who show up at the wrong precinct are no longer given a provisional ballot so they can vote properly.

Individuals can now donate up to $5,000 to political campaigns, up from the previous $4,000.

The bill was initially held in the Senate to see what the Supreme Court’s decision in the Voting Rights Act case would be. With the Supreme Court striking down part of the Voting Rights Act in June, states like North Carolina with a history of racially-motivated voter suppression no longer need federal approval to make changes to voting laws.

http://chapelboro.com/news/state-government/voter-id-bill-signed-into-law