UNC Hospitals Honors Former Mascot Jason Ray

UNC Hospitals has officially named their transplant center after former UNC mascot Jason Ray.

His father Emmett Ray talked to UNC about the dedication.

“I think it’s incredible because he loved Chapel Hill and he loved UNC,” he said. “I just think what a legacy for a 21 year-old.”

Jason Ray traveled with the UNC men’s basketball to New Jersey in 2007, fulfilling his duties as Rameses, when he was struck by a vehicle.

He died three days later, but out of his death came life.

Ray was an organ donor and has been credited with saving more than 100 lives.

“This allows it on a 365-day calendar when anybody comes in to be able to remember Jason in a positive way of what he gave as an individual and what we’re giving to the community,” said UNC professor of surgery David Gerber.

David Erving, who received Jason Ray’s kidney and pancreas, also attended the ceremony.

“He’s actually a part of me,” Erving said. “Wherever I go, he goes. That’s why I wanted to come today, to show my appreciation. I could never thank them enough, or Jason enough.”

When Ray’s death made national news in 2007, over 50,000 people signed up to be organ donors.

In his honor, his family started the Jason Kendall Ray Foundation, which raises awareness and funds for the newly-named transplant center at UNC.

So far they are nearly halfway to their goal of $1 million.

For more information on the Jason Kendall Ray Foundation, visit their website.

http://chapelboro.com/news/unc/unc-hospitals-honors-former-mascot-jason-ray

A Heart for Alj

***UPDATE: A post from the family says Alj made it through successful surgery and is now in recovery.***

After 99 consecutive days in the hospital waiting for a heart transplant, Wednesday was a long time coming for 13-year-old Albert Reginald Jeffries IV, better known as Alj (pronounced “Al-Jay”).

An update was placed on the TeamAlj Facebook page on Wednesday saying that their wishes came true, Alj was getting a heart.

This video was posted to the facebook page of Alj finding out he was getting a new heart:

Aljs response to getting his news about the heart

Posted by Teamalj fighting heart disease on Wednesday, March 9, 2016

 

Alj’s mother, Tina Turner, was away from the hospital for a few moments when the call came in:

I initially got the news about Alj getting the heart from transplant coordinator after giving my baby some space at his request, so I went to use my gift card to get my nails done .. My response after ended in me kicking my feet in the air wanting to get up and shout.

Posted by Teamalj fighting heart disease on Wednesday, March 9, 2016

 

The teenager spent months at the top of the waiting list for a transplant until the news came in on Wednesday.

“He was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy at four months old,” Alj’s mother, Tina Turner, told WCHL earlier this year. “The hospital is an all-too-familiar place for us.”

Dilated cardiomyopathy is described by the American Heart Association as a condition where the heart’s left ventricle, the main pumping chamber, becomes enlarged.

Turner said Alj has been in and out of the hospital throughout his lifetime, including a seven-month stretch immediately following his diagnosis.

Turner is a nursing technician at N.C. Memorial Hospital. She said her co-workers have been “absolutely wonderful” in their care for her son and through donation of additional leave that they have to allow her to stay with Alj. A GoFundMe page was established to help cover the medical cost and the months spent out of work while waiting on the heart transplant.

The surgery at UNC Hospital was scheduled for Wednesday.

http://chapelboro.com/featured/a-heart-for-alj

Silent No More

This Thursday, you’re invited to enjoy a fun evening out while contributing to a vitally important local cause.

It’s the Silent (No More!) Auction, Thursday, February 4, from 5:30-8:00 pm at the Hampton Inn in Carrboro. Hosted by Molly Maid of Chapel Hill and the Ms. Molly Foundation, the event (MC’d by WCHL’s Ron Stutts) features food, drinks, a silent auction and a live auction.

 

Proceeds benefit UNC Hospitals’ Beacon Child and Family Program, which helps support UNC Health Care patients, families, and employees who find themselves victimized by domestic and family violence.

Don Rice and Judy Betterton are among the event’s organizers. They joined Aaron Keck on WCHL this week to discuss the auction.

 

To purchase tickets to Thursday’s event, visit this page.

 

http://chapelboro.com/news/non-profit-news/silent-no-more

Carrboro Wrestler Winning Match Of His Life

The Carrboro High School wrestling team is off to a good start this year. The season is heating up and the state tournament is just around the corner in the start of February.

But take a closer look at those Carrboro wrestlers. On that team, you’ll find one of the most inspiring stories we’ve had the privilege of hearing in a long time.

There’s Dante Veltri. He’s a senior this year at CHS and he’s been been on the wrestling team since he was a freshman. The Veltris are a wrestling family: he and his two brothers David and PJ all started competing when they were toddlers living back in New Jersey.

His coach, DeWitt Driscoll, says Dante’s a pretty special kid. “I think one of the best words is ‘tenacious,’” he says. “He’s one of the most tenacious kids I’ve met. He’s got big goals, he’s got big dreams.”

And last February, wrestling in the 120-pound division, Dante took fourth at the state finals in Greensboro.

Dante Veltri Carrboro Wrestling 4th place state finals

Fittingly, he’s only slightly happy with that finish. (“I really wanted to win,” he says.) But fourth place is big news. A top-four finish at states qualifies you to be able to train at regional training centers – including one at UNC that’s run by Coleman Scott, who won a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics. “Dante can go once or twice a week and train with an Olympic medalist,” says Driscoll.

But that is not why you’re going to remember Dante Veltri.

This is.

“I noticed, like, a lump one day. It was really sore.”

The lump was under his arm. It was the fall of 2013. Dante had just begun his sophomore year.

“We went to the doctor to see what it was; they put me on medicine, antibiotics for a couple weeks,” he says. “I didn’t think anything of it, other than it was keeping me off the mat.”

But when the swelling didn’t go away, doctors recommended a biopsy – and the news wasn’t good.

Karen Veltri is Dante’s mother. “The biopsy was October 15,” she says. “And on October 17” – she remembers the date – “they called me at work.”

Dante was only 15 years old. He’d been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“And I had to go pick him up from school and bring him home,” Karen says, “and tell him he had cancer.”

Listen to Part 1 of WCHL’s story on Dante Veltri.

 

True to form, Karen says when she broke the news, Dante’s first question was:

“What about wrestling?”

“I told him we’re not going to be wrestling for a while,” she says. “We have a much bigger match right now.”

Over at Carrboro High School, DeWitt Driscoll says he’d been worried ever since he first saw the lump on Dante’s arm – but it was still hard news to take.

“It threw me backwards, you know,” he says. “Especially when you have a kid like Dante, that I’ve been so close with for so long – emotionally it was really hard to hold it together.”

But with cancer treatments looming and his wrestling career possibly over, Dante Veltri did what he always did: he got to work.

“Right after I heard, I was upset, I didn’t really want to talk to people,” he says. “And then after like 10 minutes, I just wanted to figure out the plan.”

Dante Veltri received his cancer diagnosis on October 17, 2013. His mom Karen says the treatment began immediately.

“He took everything,” she says. “You don’t know what’s coming at you. Biopsies, scans – they drilled into his hips to check and make sure it wasn’t in his bone marrow. They did a lot of invasive things, and he just took it all in stride.”

Between October of 2013 and January of 2014, Dante went through five rounds of chemo at UNC Hospitals, each lasting several days. Karen Veltri says the last round lasted more than 160 hours.

“Through it all, he was amazing,” she says. “He figured out that walking the hospital floor 16 rounds was a mile, so he would get out there and do that. He stayed active. He went to school, he kept up his grades…

“You know, the treatment is pretty brutal. It not only kills the cancer cells, it just attacks everything…but he did whatever was asked of him and never complained. It wasn’t easy, believe me. Watching him was not easy. But I’m proud of him. He did great.”

While Karen Veltri watched her son go through the biggest fight of his life, through it all, Dante kept his focus.

“I didn’t think much of it,” he says. “The whole time I just wanted to get back to a normal life, get back on the mat.”

Listen to Part 2 of WCHL’s story on Dante Veltri.

 

And in January, after that grueling fifth round of chemo, a PET scan showed Dante was all clear. Three months later, he was cleared to wrestle again – and coach DeWitt Driscoll says that first practice back was special.

“We were at a club facility we go to in Hillsborough,” he says. “It’s kind of an old, dingy beat-up place and it usually has kind of a dark aura to it, because there’s so much darkness in there…but that day, man, I just remember it was bright.”

Dante’s doctor told him it would likely be about a year until he was back to normal, but Driscoll says his wrestler was close to 100 percent after only two months. Of course Dante would have to wait into the later fall for the start of the wrestling season – but in the meantime, he was happy just being a normal kid again.

“Not playing keep-up all year, like in sophomore year, was huge,” he says. “My grades (were) amazing, (and) being on the mat the whole year – it was awesome.”

And when the wrestling season finally began – even after a year of missed practices and biopsies and tests and week-long chemo treatments – it quickly became clear that Dante Veltri hadn’t missed a beat.

And his mom Karen was there every step of the way – all the way to Greensboro, for the state finals last February.

“I’m on the bleachers every match,” she says. (Dante corroborates: “I could hear her from all the way down on the mat in that huge Greensboro Coliseum.”)

He’d faced five rounds of chemo, and in Greensboro he faced five opponents. “It was pretty intense,” says Karen. “One of his matches he wrestled somebody that every time during the season he had beat him, and then it turned into a nailbiter at states, where you’re just shaking because you’re thinking, oh my gosh, he’s never lost to this kid, what’s going on? And then he won.”

Dante Veltri Carrboro wrestling

And when it was all over, Dante Veltri, barely a year removed from intensive cancer treatments, had finished fourth in the state.

“The year before that, he was still dealing with scars on his chest (and) his hair was still all missing,” says Driscoll. “Just to think back to where he was a year prior to being on the podium at states…

“Most people would say he came a long way, but he doesn’t see it that way. He just took the next step in his life.”

Now? Dante Veltri is a senior at Carrboro High School. He’s still on the wrestling team, hoping for even bigger and better results. His fight back from cancer has won statewide recognition: last year, the North Carolina High School Athletics Association honored Dante with the A.J. “Tony” Simeon Courage Award. But for now his goals are pretty straightforward.

“I want to get straight As in school,” he says. “And win my first state title.”

January 8 marked two years since his last chemo treatment. On that day, he pinned his opponent on the wrestling mat to claim his 100th career victory – a significant milestone, even for a wrestler who hadn’t missed an entire season of competition.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

But that’s still not the end of the story – because this isn’t only about one family and one kid. It’s about our community as well.

And while Dante Veltri was in the hospital, his mom Karen says the community came through with incredible support.

“The amount of support that poured out of Carrboro High School, his athletic director, the doctors, the nurses…I can’t even believe how much they did,” she says. “Baskets of stuff would come from school for him with his favorite foods or gift cards…just the amount of support, it was really overwhelming.”

Carrboro High School athletic director April Ross even organized a 5K to raise funds for Dante’s treatment – and now, there are plans to keep that 5K going annually, to raise funds no longer for one family, but for UNC’s entire department of pediatric oncology.

And Karen Veltri went even further. She organized an initiative called “Take Down Cancer” – collecting not money but board games, 100 board games last year alone, to give to kids fighting cancer at UNC Hospitals.

“Being there so much, you’d see these little kids, they’re 4, 5, 6 years old and they don’t know what’s going on, and all of them have a smile on their face most of the time,” she says. “And so we just decided that we were going to do this game drive, and his whole team jumped right on board.”

It’s been more than two years since Dante Veltri was diagnosed with cancer. Today, he’s cancer-free, back on the mat, preparing for a run at a state title, his coach DeWitt Driscoll cheering him on.

“The silver lining from it may be that he gained a little more perspective,” Driscoll says. “Just being on the mat competing is what the fun of it is. The rest is just gravy, whether you’re winning or not.”

The Veltris are still a long way removed from New Jersey – but for Dante’s mom Karen, Chapel Hill is home now, in a way it hadn’t been before.

“When I first moved down here, I kind of felt guilty, taking my kids away from family and friends,” she says. “And it’s kind of strange that it took a cancer diagnosis for me to realize – we are exactly where we need to be. I don’t know that we would have got that (support) anywhere else.”

And as for the teen at the center of it all?

I asked Dante Veltri what he’s learned from this whole experience.

“Don’t give up,” he says. “Even if the odds are against you, don’t give up. Anything is possible.”

His mom Karen, standing by his side, agrees.

“You know, there is light at the end of the tunnel,” she says. “There’s help out there. There’s people that care. Just keep pushing. Keep trudging forward.

“You’ll get where you need to be.”

To learn more about the Take Down Cancer drive, or about how you can donate to the UNC Pediatric Oncology clinic, email Karen Veltri at TakeDownCancer2@gmail.com.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-wrestler-winning-match-of-his-life

“Untold Stories Of Pearl Harbor”

Franklin Roosevelt described it as “a date which will live in infamy”…but there’s still a great deal about Pearl Harbor that isn’t widely known.

Chapel Hill High School history teacher and author Bill Melega is giving a free lecture on “The Untold Stories of Pearl Harbor” Saturday, January 23, from 10:30 am to noon at the SECU Family House in Chapel Hill. Melega will share personal stories of survivors, talk about the events leading up to the attack, and answer frequently asked questions.

Bill Melega (and Sondra Komada of the SECU Family House) spoke this week with WCHL’s Aaron Keck.

 

Melega is the author of “Bringing the Great War Home, Volume IV,” part of a series on World War I, as well as an SAT review book for Barron’s Publishing. He’s also been widely recognized for his teaching skills: he was CHHS Teacher of the Year in 2007-08, and in 2010 he was named the Veterans of Foreign Wars National Citizenship Teacher of the Year.

The lecture is free, but space is limited. To reserve a spot, email Sondra Komada: sondra@secufamilyhouse.org.

Located at 123 Old Mason Farm Road, the SECU Family House provides low-cost housing for patients at UNC Hospitals, as well as their families.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-town/untold-stories-of-pearl-harbor

Carrboro Wrestler Winning Match Of His Life

The Carrboro High School wrestling team is on the rise. The Jaguars took a big group to states in Greensboro this February and they’re looking forward to bigger and better things next season.

But take a closer look at those Carrboro wrestlers. On that team, you’ll find one of the most inspiring stories we’ve had the privilege of hearing in a long time.

There’s Dante Veltri, just wrapping up his junior year at CHS. He’s been on the team since he was a freshman. The Veltris are a wrestling family: he and his two brothers David and PJ all started competing when they were toddlers living back in New Jersey.

His coach, DeWitt Driscoll, says Dante’s a pretty special kid. “I think one of the best words is ‘tenacious,’” he says. “He’s one of the most tenacious kids I’ve met. He’s got big goals, he’s got big dreams.”

And back in February, wrestling in the 120-pound division, Dante took fourth at the state finals in Greensboro.

Dante Veltri Carrboro Wrestling 4th place state finals

 

Fittingly, he’s only slightly happy with that finish. (“I really wanted to win,” he says.) But fourth place is big news. A top-four finish at states qualifies you to be able to train at regional training centers – including one at UNC that’s run by Coleman Scott, who won a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics. “Dante can go once or twice a week and train with an Olympic medalist,” says Driscoll.

But that is not why you’re going to remember Dante Veltri.

This is.

“I noticed, like, a lump one day. It was really sore.”

The lump was under his arm. It was the fall of 2013. Dante had just begun his sophomore year.

“We went to the doctor to see what it was; they put me on medicine, antibiotics for a couple weeks,” he says. “I didn’t think anything of it, other than it was keeping me off the mat.”

But when the swelling didn’t go away, doctors recommended a biopsy – and the news wasn’t good.

Karen Veltri is Dante’s mother. “The biopsy was October 15,” she says. “And on October 17” – she remembers the date – “they called me at work.”

Dante was only 15 years old. He’d been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

“And I had to go pick him up from school and bring him home,” Karen says, “and tell him he had cancer.”

True to form, Karen says when she broke the news, Dante’s first question was:

“What about wrestling?”

“I told him we’re not going to be wrestling for a while,” she says. “We have a much bigger match right now.”

Over at Carrboro High School, DeWitt Driscoll says he’d been worried ever since he first saw the lump on Dante’s arm – but it was still hard news to take.

“It threw me backwards, you know,” he says. “Especially when you have a kid like Dante, that I’ve been so close with for so long – emotionally it was really hard to hold it together.”

But with cancer treatments looming and his wrestling career possibly over, Dante Veltri did what he always did: he got to work.
“Right after I heard, I was upset, I didn’t really want to talk to people,” he says. “And then after like 10 minutes, I just wanted to figure out the plan.”

Dante Veltri received his cancer diagnosis on October 17, 2013. His mom Karen says the treatment began immediately.

“He took everything,” she says. “You don’t know what’s coming at you. Biopsies, scans – they drilled into his hips to check and make sure it wasn’t in his bone marrow. They did a lot of invasive things, and he just took it all in stride.”

Between October of 2013 and January of 2014, Dante went through five rounds of chemo at UNC Hospitals, each lasting several days. Karen Veltri says the last round lasted more than 160 hours.

“Through it all, he was amazing,” she says. “He figured out that walking the hospital floor 16 rounds was a mile, so he would get out there and do that. He stayed active. He went to school, he kept up his grades…

“You know, the treatment is pretty brutal. It not only kills the cancer cells, it just attacks everything…but he did whatever was asked of him and never complained. It wasn’t easy, believe me. Watching him was not easy. But I’m proud of him. He did great.”

While Karen Veltri watched her son go through the biggest fight of his life, through it all, Dante kept his focus.

“I didn’t think much of it,” he says. “The whole time I just wanted to get back to a normal life, get back on the mat.”

And in January, after that grueling fifth round of chemo, a PET scan showed Dante was all clear. Three months later, he was cleared to wrestle again – and coach DeWitt Driscoll says that first practice back was special.

“We were at a club facility we go to in Hillsborough,” he says. “It’s kind of an old, dingy beat-up place and it usually has kind of a dark aura to it, because there’s so much darkness in there…but that day, man, I just remember it was bright.”

Dante’s doctor told him it would likely be about a year until he was back to normal, but Driscoll says his wrestler was close to 100 percent after only two months. Of course Dante would have to wait into the later fall for the start of the wrestling season – but in the meantime, he was happy just being a normal kid again.

“Not playing keep-up all year, like (in) sophomore year, was huge,” he says. “My grades have been amazing, (and) being on the mat the whole year – it was awesome.”

And when the wrestling season finally began – even after a year of missed practices and biopsies and tests and week-long chemo treatments – it quickly became clear that Dante Veltri hadn’t missed a beat.

And his mom Karen was there every step of the way – all the way to Greensboro, for the state finals in February.

“I’m on the bleachers every match,” she says. (Dante corroborates: “I could hear her from all the way down on the mat in that huge Greensboro Coliseum.”)

He’d faced five rounds of chemo, and in Greensboro he faced five opponents. “It was pretty intense,” says Karen. “One of his matches he wrestled somebody that every time during the season he had beat him, and then it turned into a nailbiter at states, where you’re just shaking because you’re thinking, oh my gosh, he’s never lost to this kid, what’s going on? And then he won.”

Dante Veltri Carrboro wrestling

 

And when it was all over, Dante Veltri, barely a year removed from intensive cancer treatments, had finished fourth in the state.

“The year before that, he was still dealing with scars on his chest (and) his hair was still all missing,” says Driscoll. “Just to think back to where he was a year prior to being on the podium at states…

“Most people would say he came a long way, but he doesn’t see it that way. He just took the next step in his life.”

Now? Dante Veltri is about to be a senior at Carrboro High School. He’s still on the wrestling team, hoping for even bigger and better results. His fight back from cancer has won statewide recognition: earlier this year, the North Carolina High School Athletics Association honored Dante with the A.J. “Tony” Simeon Courage Award. But for now his goals are pretty straightforward.

“I want to get straight As in school,” he says. “And win my first state title.”

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

DeWitt Driscoll, Dante Veltri, and Karen Veltri.

 

But that’s still not the end of the story – because this isn’t only about one family and one kid. It’s about our community as well.

And while Dante Veltri was in the hospital, his mom Karen says the community came through with incredible support.

“The amount of support that poured out of Carrboro High School, his athletic director, the doctors, the nurses…I can’t even believe how much they did,” she says. “Baskets of stuff would come from school for him with his favorite foods or gift cards…just the amount of support, it was really overwhelming.”

Carrboro High School athletic director April Ross even organized a 5K to raise funds for Dante’s treatment – and now, there are plans to keep that 5K going annually, to raise funds no longer for one family, but for UNC’s entire department of pediatric oncology.

And Karen Veltri went even further. She organized an initiative called “Take Down Cancer” – collecting not money but board games, to give to kids fighting cancer at UNC Hospitals.

“Being there so much, you’d see these little kids, they’re 4, 5, 6 years old and they don’t know what’s going on, and all of them have a smile on their face most of the time,” she says. “And so we just decided that we were going to do this game drive, and his whole team jumped right on board.”

It’s been two years since Dante Veltri was diagnosed with cancer. Today, he’s cancer-free, back on the mat, preparing for a run at a state title, his coach DeWitt Driscoll cheering him on.

“The silver lining from it may be that he gained a little more perspective,” Driscoll says. “Just being on the mat competing is what the fun of it is. The rest is just gravy, whether you’re winning or not.”

The Veltris are still a long way removed from New Jersey – but for Dante’s mom Karen, Chapel Hill is home now, in a way it hadn’t been before.

“When I first moved down here, I kind of felt guilty, taking my kids away from family and friends,” she says. “And it’s kind of strange that it took a cancer diagnosis for me to realize – we are exactly where we need to be. I don’t know that we would have got that (support) anywhere else.”

And as for the teen at the center of it all?

I asked Dante Veltri what he’s learned from this whole experience.

“Don’t give up,” he says. “Even if the odds are against you, don’t give up. Anything is possible.”

His mom Karen, standing by his side, agrees.

“You know, there is light at the end of the tunnel,” she says. “There’s help out there. There’s people that care. Just keep pushing. Keep trudging forward.

“You’ll get where you need to be.”

To learn more about the Take Down Cancer drive, or about how you can donate to the UNC Pediatric Oncology clinic, email Karen Veltri at TakeDownCancer2@gmail.com.

http://chapelboro.com/news/pre-k-12-education/carrboro-wrestler-winning-fight-for-his-life

SECU Family House Is Home For Thousands

More than 2,000 people call it home each year – and more than a few of them say it’s been a literal lifesaver.

It’s the SECU Family House on Old Mason Farm Road, with 40 rooms to house out-of-town patients (and their families) receiving treatment at UNC Hospitals. It housed 2,271 people in the last fiscal year, all of them coming in from at least 40 miles away.

SECU Family House 2015 - Interior

It costs about $82 each night to operate a room – but with the help of donations from generous organizations and community members, the Family House is able to charge families only $35 per night, far less than the cost of a hotel. (The Family House operates on a pay-what-you-can model, so some families pay even less.)

Sondra Komada of the SECU Family House stopped by WCHL and spoke with Aaron Keck – joined by Kara Ross of Jacksonville and her mother Kris Murtagh. Ross and Murtagh are staying at the house – Murtagh coming all the way from Pennsylvania – while Ross is undergoing cancer treatment at UNC.

 

The Family House is currently raising funds through the “40 in 40 Challenge”: through December 1, every dollar raised up to $40,000 will be matched by another donor, for a total of up to $80,000.

For more information on the SECU Family House – and how you can become a volunteer or donor – visit SECUFamilyHouse.org.

http://chapelboro.com/news/non-profit-news/secu-family-house-is-home-for-thousands

Sunday, Blue Zone Hosts “A Tasteful Affair” For RMH

More than two dozen local restaurants, bakeries, breweries and food vendors will be showcasing their wares for a cause this Sunday, November 1, from 6-8 pm at Kenan Stadium’s Blue Zone.

It’s “A Tasteful Affair,” an annual event to raise funds for the Ronald McDonald House of Chapel Hill. This year marks the 25th anniversary of A Tasteful Affair, one of the RMH’s biggest annual fundraisers.

It’s an especially big year for the Ronald McDonald House, which provides housing for families with kids receiving treatment at UNC Hospitals. They’re undergoing a major expansion, which will enable them to serve even more families. (The RMH houses nearly 2,200 families each year, but it has to turn away about 800 more for lack of room.)

Elizabeth Hullender of the Ronald McDonald House joined Aaron Keck on WCHL to discuss A Tasteful Affair.

 

Find out more about A Tasteful Affair and purchase tickets at this link.

http://chapelboro.com/news/non-profit-news/sunday-blue-zone-hosts-a-tasteful-affair-for-rmh

UNC Hospitals Ranks Nationally: USNWR

US News and World Report has just released its annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals,” and UNC Hospitals were recognized all across the board.

The list ranks UNC Hospitals as the no. 3 hospital in North Carolina and no. 2 in the Raleigh-Durham area. (Duke University Hospital ranked no. 1 in the state.) UNC Hospitals also ranked in the top 50 in the nation in five specialties: cancer, gynecology, pulmonology, urology, and ear, nose and throat.

UNC’s School of Medicine ranked no. 2 in the nation for primary care and no. 22 for research.

See the details of UNC Hospitals’ USNWR rankings here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/health/unc-hospitals-ranks-nationally-usnwr

Two Hit By Car Thurs Night On Franklin St

Another incident involving a vehicle striking a pedestrian – two pedestrians, in this case – occurred late Thursday night in downtown Chapel Hill.

According to Chapel Hill police, the incident took place on West Franklin Street at about 11 p.m. Two pedestrians, one male and one female, were struck by a vehicle in the crosswalk by SunTrust Bank.

The driver remained on scene, and both pedestrians were transported to UNC Hospitals with minor injuries.

The full statement from Chapel Hill Police is below:

“On Thursday at approximately 11 p.m., the Chapel Hill Police Department responded to a reported traffic accident involving two pedestrians on W. Franklin St. Upon officers arrival they found a male and female that had reportedly been struck by a vehicle while in the crosswalk in front of SunTrust Bank.  Both the male and female were transported to UNC Hospital with what appeared to be only minor injuries. Both driver and vehicle were still on scene. The investigation is ongoing and additional information will be forthcoming.”

The Town of Chapel Hill has stepped up its efforts to promote bike and pedestrian safety this month – including targeted enforcement and electronic signs in high-traffic areas. Read more about it here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/safety/two-hit-car-thurs-night-franklin-st