GAME RECAP: UNC 34, PITT 27

CHAPEL HILL – UNC Won their fifth consecutive game today against the Pittsburgh Panthers giving them a .500 record for the season.

The game opened up with the Pittsburgh Panthers receiving the kick off and Lafayette Pitt made a strong beginning.  Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage kept nailing his throws down the field making it to inside the 10 yard line.

Carolina defense stepped up the defense and didn’t give up the field, forcing Pittsburgh to take a 28 yard field goal. 0-3

UNC didn’t get the same momentum off the first drive as many people were expecting.  Their drive only gained 2 yards before the Tar Heels punted the ball back to the Panthers.

Pittsburgh’s second drive once again showed the power of running back James Conner when mixed with Tom Savage.  The Panthers drove the ball 61 yards down the field until Kareem Martin came in with a sack forcing a fumble from Savage.

UNC’s Travis Hughes recovered the fumbled ball on the North Carolina 24.  This time the Tar Heels made some successful plays and continued to move the ball down field.  After 12 plays and 60 yards, Marquis Williams finished off the drive by rushing 16 yards into the in zone.

UNC’s touchdown closed out the first quarter leaving only 38 seconds for Pittsburgh. 7-3

The second quarter began in favor of the Tar Heels by pushing the Panthers back 12 yards and forcing a punt at the beginning.

UNC’s rushing game made for a big presence during their 53 yard drive down the field.  They didn’t make to the in-zone, but successfully got a 38 yard field goal giving them a nice lead over the Panthers. 10-3

UNC’s defense continued to be hard hitting, forcing Pittsburgh to make small plays and forcing them to punt the ball after only a 20-yard drive.

UNC kept up the momentum after the punt with an amazing pass to Eric Ebron, gaining 58 yards on the play and moving the ball to the Pittsburgh 32. The Tar Heels kept the pressure up and continued to move the ball down the field with short passes from Williams and a couple rushes from T.J. Logan.  Williams made his second touchdown with a 10-yard rush into the in-zone. 17-3

After kicking off the ball back to the Panthers, the Tar Heels defense continued to stop any progress down the field.  After a few small plays, Kareem Martin sacked Tom Savage for a 10-yard loss and making the Panthers punt the ball.

UNC finished off the half with a 65-yard kick-off return by Ryan Switzer to secure a lead for the Carolina Tar Heels. 24-3

The Tar Heels didn’t start off the second half with the same momentum and force that they ended with at the half.  After gaining a few yards, several incomplete passes forced the Tar Heels to punt the ball.

Carolina Defense again showed their strength by cutting out the Pittsburgh rushing game.  Kareem Martin got another great sack on Tom Savage forcing a fumble and recovering the ball at the 12.

Although Carolina got a hold of the ball close to the in-zone, Pittsburgh defense was stopping the Carolina fast-paced offense. After a loss on a rush and a short pass, the Tar Heels didn’t get the first down they needed and took a successful 27-yard field goal. 27-3

The Pittsburgh Panthers answered right back to the Carolina field goal with a powerful drive taking the ball down the field.  Several passes by quarterback Tom Savage led to the first downs that allowed the Panthers to continue momentum towards the in-zone.  The drive ended with a 33-yard pass to Devin Street for their first touchdown of the game. 27-10

In the fourth quarter the Pittsburgh Panthers stepped up the pressure and made several strong plays.  They started out with a 96 yard drive that took the Panthers all the way to the Carolina in-zone.  The final play of the drive was an 8 yard pass to Isaac Bennett for the touchdown. 27-17

On receiving the kick off, UNC slowly pushed the ball a few yards up the field until a holding penalty and fumble switched possession back to the Panthers on Carolina territory.

The Tar Heels kept up the defense again and Otis sacked Tom Savage to keep them from getting a first down.  The Pittsburgh Panthers made a successful field goal from 42 yards to bring them closer to the Tar Heels. 27-20

At the kick-off, the Tar Heels fumbled the ball at the North Carolina 13 and was recovered by Pitt Jason from Pittsburgh.  After a short rush, the Tar Heels got a call for pass interference, leaving the Panthers only 2-yards away from a touchdown.  Pittsburgh quickly launched James Conner over the line of scrimmage and into the in zone, tying up the game 27-27.

UNC didn’t have the momentum they needed for the next drive as they only made it 15-yards before needing to punt the ball back to Pittsburgh.  Fortunately the Carolina defense was ready for the Panthers and quickly shut them down before any big plays could be made.

The kickoff to UNC lead to the last touchdown of the game as Ryan Switzer ran 61 yards for a kick-off return touchdown, giving the Tar Heels the lead once again with 34-27.

With 5 minutes left in the fourth, the Tar Heels needed to guarantee the Panthers didn’t make it into the in zone again.  With one final drive, Savage threw a 21-yard pass to start.  After getting another first down and reaching behind the 40-yard line, the Panthers kept up momentum. The Carolina defense stepped up to the plate though and held off the Panthers from making it past the Carolina 25-yard line.

With only a minute and some change left the Tar Heels held onto the ball to secure their win.

Overall Carolina had 173 passing yards, a149 rushing yards, with 17 first downs and 2 turnovers. The Pittsburgh Panthers showed up well on paper too with 313 passing yards, 46 rushing yards, and 22 first downs.

North Carolina now has a .500 record for the season and made their fifth consecutive win for the regular season.

http://chapelboro.com/huddle-up-2012/game-recap-unc-34-pitt-27/

Carolina Win Against Pittsburgh Makes For .500 Season Record

CHAPEL HILL – UNC won their fourth consecutive game against the Pittsburgh Panthers Saturday, giving them a .500 record for the season.

The game opened up with the Pittsburgh Panthers receiving the kick off and Lafayette Pitt made a strong beginning.  Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage kept nailing his throws down the field making it to inside the 10 yard line.

Carolina defense stepped up the defense and didn’t give up the field, forcing Pittsburgh to take a 28 yard field goal. 0-3

UNC didn’t get the same momentum off the first drive as many people were expecting.  Their drive only gained 2 yards before the Tar Heels punted the ball back to the Panthers.

Pittsburgh’s second drive once again showed the power of running back James Conner when mixed with Tom Savage.  The Panthers drove the ball 61 yards down the field until Kareem Martin came in with a sack forcing a fumble from Savage.

UNC’s Travis Hughes recovered the fumbled ball on the North Carolina 24.  This time the Tar Heels made some successful plays and continued to move the ball down field.  After 12 plays and 60 yards, Marquis Williams finished off the drive by rushing 16 yards into the in zone.

UNC’s touchdown closed out the first quarter leaving only 38 seconds for Pittsburgh. 7-3

The second quarter began in favor of the Tar Heels by pushing the Panthers back 12 yards and forcing a punt at the beginning.

UNC’s rushing game made for a big presence during their 53 yard drive down the field.  They didn’t make to the in-zone, but successfully got a 38 yard field goal giving them a nice lead over the Panthers. 10-3

UNC’s defense continued to be hard hitting, forcing Pittsburgh to make small plays and forcing them to punt the ball after only a 20-yard drive.

UNC kept up the momentum after the punt with an amazing pass to Eric Ebron, gaining 58 yards on the play and moving the ball to the Pittsburgh 32. The Tar Heels kept the pressure up and continued to move the ball down the field with short passes from Williams and a couple rushes from T.J. Logan.  Williams made his second touchdown with a 10-yard rush into the in-zone. 17-3

After kicking off the ball back to the Panthers, the Tar Heels defense continued to stop any progress down the field.  After a few small plays, Kareem Martin sacked Tom Savage for a 10-yard loss and making the Panthers punt the ball.

UNC finished off the half with a 65-yard kick-off return by Ryan Switzer to secure a lead for the Carolina Tar Heels. 24-3

The Tar Heels didn’t start off the second half with the same momentum and force that they ended with at the half.  After gaining a few yards, several incomplete passes forced the Tar Heels to punt the ball.

Carolina Defense again showed their strength by cutting out the Pittsburgh rushing game.  Kareem Martin got another great sack on Tom Savage forcing a fumble and recovering the ball at the 12.

Although Carolina got a hold of the ball close to the in-zone, Pittsburgh defense was stopping the Carolina fast-paced offense. After a loss on a rush and a short pass, the Tar Heels didn’t get the first down they needed and took a successful 27-yard field goal. 27-3

The Pittsburgh Panthers answered right back to the Carolina field goal with a powerful drive taking the ball down the field.  Several passes by quarterback Tom Savage led to the first downs that allowed the Panthers to continue momentum towards the in-zone.  The drive ended with a 33-yard pass to Devin Street for their first touchdown of the game. 27-10

In the fourth quarter the Pittsburgh Panthers stepped up the pressure and made several strong plays.  They started out with a 96 yard drive that took the Panthers all the way to the Carolina in-zone.  The final play of the drive was an 8 yard pass to Isaac Bennett for the touchdown. 27-17

On receiving the kick off, UNC slowly pushed the ball a few yards up the field until a holding penalty and fumble switched possession back to the Panthers on Carolina territory.

The Tar Heels kept up the defense again and Otis sacked Tom Savage to keep them from getting a first down.  The Pittsburgh Panthers made a successful field goal from 42 yards to bring them closer to the Tar Heels. 27-20

At the kick-off, the Tar Heels fumbled the ball at the North Carolina 13 and was recovered by Pitt Jason from Pittsburgh.  After a short rush, the Tar Heels got a call for pass interference, leaving the Panthers only 2-yards away from a touchdown.  Pittsburgh quickly launched James Conner over the line of scrimmage and into the in zone, tying up the game 27-27.

UNC didn’t have the momentum they needed for the next drive as they only made it 15-yards before needing to punt the ball back to Pittsburgh.  Fortunately the Carolina defense was ready for the Panthers and quickly shut them down before any big plays could be made.

The kickoff to UNC lead to the last touchdown of the game as Ryan Switzer ran 61 yards for a kick-off return touchdown, giving the Tar Heels the lead once again with 34-27.

With 5 minutes left in the fourth, the Tar Heels needed to guarantee the Panthers didn’t make it into the in zone again.  With one final drive, Savage threw a 21-yard pass to start.  After getting another first down and reaching behind the 40-yard line, the Panthers kept up momentum. The Carolina defense stepped up to the plate though and held off the Panthers from making it past the Carolina 25-yard line.

With only a minute and some change left the Tar Heels held onto the ball to secure their win.

Overall Carolina had 173 passing yards, a149 rushing yards, with 17 first downs and 2 turnovers. The Pittsburgh Panthers showed up well on paper too with 313 passing yards, 46 rushing yards, and 22 first downs.

North Carolina now has a .500 record for the season and made their fourth consecutive win for the regular season.

http://chapelboro.com/sports/unc-sports/carolina-win-against-pittsburgh-makes-for-500-season-record/

Tar Heel Downtown Proves Success For Businesses

CHAPEL HILL – Tar Heel Downtown took over Franklin Street for pre-games festivities as part of Zero Dark Thursday and it proved more successful than many anticipated.

Executive director of the Chapel Hill downtown partnership, Meg McGurk, said Tar Heel Downtown brought many people onto Franklin Street to celebrate and tailgate before the showdown against the Miami Hurricanes.

“I think it was a tremendous success and it did go fantastic and much than I’d thought, I was very excited and the response that I’ve gotten so far has been overwhelmingly positive” McGurk said.

Manager of Lime Fresh in Chapel Hill, Jason King, said the way the event was held worked well for many of the stores and restaurants.

“I think, being that they shut down Franklin Street, that was actually perfect because this is the busiest street in Chapel Hill and this is where everything happens, they picked the perfect spot because it was actually on our patio” King said.

Tar Heel Downtown was one of the few times that UNC and the Town of Chapel Hill coordinated to set up such a large event for UNC athletics.  McGurk said she was on-hand for many of the evening’s activities.

“The community and the people that were there at the event, I mean everyone coming up to me and really excited and really happy and everyone that I spoke to was so happy to have something downtown on Franklin Street for them to do before the game, before they were going to go to the stadium” McGurk stated.

The success of Tar Heel Downtown brought more business to many of the stores and restaurants in downtown Chapel Hill.  Several places held special events to pull in even more people to their business like Carolina Brewery’s Beer Garden and Top of the Hill’s Craft Brewery’s tailgate.

Both McGurk and King said they look forward to more events like Tar Heel Downtown that bring the community and the school together.

“I would like to pursue looking at doing more events like this definitely; there is not doubt that UNC sports are an economic driver for our downtown and for tourism as well as getting our community to come downtown, I think its kind of a no brainer to continue to do events like this, it was a tremendous success last night” McGurk said.

“Let’s do it again, I don’t know when UNC and Chapel Hill can do it again, but yeah we’re ready for it, so lets do it again” King said.

A family friendly event, Tar Heel Downtown brought many people from the community into Franklin Street to celebrate UNC Football and supporting many businesses.  McGurk thanked all of the people that helped put this event together.

“A huge thank you to the Town of Chapel Hill and to UNC and UNC sports marketing, and all of the folks that made this happen, it was a very unique event that we had never done before, we had never that closed stretch of Franklin Street on a Thursday evening” McGurk stated.

http://chapelboro.com/news/entertainment/tar-heel-downtown-proves-success-for-business-community/

“Meet The Heels” Set To Get Fans Fired Up For Football

CHAPEL HILL—Kenan Stadium will come alive once again on August 3 as Tar Heel fans will have the chance to get geared up for another season of UNC football and the “Fedora Freak Show.”

The fan fest will occur just 26 short days before the Tar Heels kick off the entire college football season with a huge rivalry game against the University of South Carolina Gamecocks down in Columbia, S.C. The game will be broadcasted on ESPN nationwide on Aug. 29.

With high hopes for a special season, this year’s Meet The Heels will sure to be a great atmosphere for all in attendance.

The day’s festivities will begin when the gates to Kenan open at 3 p.m. The official Meet the Heels program is set to start at 4 p.m. Fans should use Gates 2, 5, 6 or either of the Blue Zone gates in the east end zone.

The event will be jam packed with ways for Tar Heel fans to interact with the UNC football team. And this includes autographs. Defensive players will sign from 4-5 p.m. and offensive players will sign from 5-6 p.m. Head coach Larry Fedora will be signing autographs from 4-6 p.m.

The kids will have plenty to get excited about as well. A Carolina Kids Zone will be located in the east end of Kenan Stadium featuring inflatables and games for children of all ages. The Kids Zone will close at 6 p.m.

In addition, free Carolina football trading cards, pocket schedules, and posters will be handed out until supplies run out.

Food will be sold from the concession stands and restroom facilities on the north and south sides will be open for the event.

Parking can be found in the Rams Head Deck and the new Bell Tower Deck for $5 and for free in the Craige, Cardinal and Jackson parking decks off Manning Drive.

http://chapelboro.com/sports/unc-sports/meet-the-heels-set-to-get-fans-fired-up-for-football/

Kansas, Kansas, Kansas (Ugh!)


It had to be Kansas. Kansas. Kansas.

Roy Williams may be over the heartbreak and heartache his leaving Lawrence caused in 2003, but it’s just getting worse with me. The tweets, emails and blog posts are already out there, claiming that Bill Self has built a better program at KU than ol’ Roy has at UNC over the last 10 years.

Statistics don’t show that (they’re pretty damn even, in fact), but the fact that Tar Heels have now gone home at the hands of the Jayhawks in three of the last six NCAA Tournaments makes it seem that way to a lot of basketball fans.

Both programs have been great all the way back to the Phog Allen and Frank McGuire eras, each having blip periods that caused them to change coaches. But the last 10 years have been basically even-steven, certainly close enough to disavow any notion that one guy has out-coached the other.

Kansas and Self have won more games and have a better record (300-58 for 84%) than Carolina and Williams (282-79 for 78%), but that is largely due to several factors over that 10-year span.

One, Self took over a Kansas team that Williams left in sounder shape than the one Roy inherited from Matt Doherty. Two, the Tar Heels had one dreadful season in the last 10 years, the 20-17 debacle that followed losing four starters off the 2009 national champions. And, three, Carolina’s overall pipeline to the pros has been better than Self’s at Kansas, which ironically has made it worse for UNC.

Thirteen players have been drafted in the first round during the Williams era, 11 of them who left a total of 17 seasons on the Tar Heel table. Compare that to Kansas under Self, which has produced nine first-round picks,   one who left after one year, two who left after two and another two who left after three seasons. If you add Mario Chalmers, the MOP of the 20008 Final Four who was drafted in the second round, the Jayhawks have lost 10   seasons of eligibility in the last 10 years.

As for the NCAA Tournament, Self and Kansas have been there all 10 years but with less results than Carolina and Williams in nine trips. KU has one national championship (’08) and reached another Final Four (2012) and could still improve on those numbers this season. The Jayhawks have gone out in three regional finals, one Sweet Sixteen (and counting), one second round ouster and two embarrassing first-round upsets (Bucknell and Bradley in 2005 and ’06).

Carolina under Williams has those 2005 and ’09 NCAA titles, one other Final Four and three Elite Eight game goners. Sunday’s loss to KU was the third second-round ouster for UNC and Williams, who holds the record of 23 consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances with at least one victory. Both Self and Williams have won three national Coach of the Year honors at their current schools.

Their conference records are pretty close, with Self winning a few more regular-season and tournament titles in the Big 12 than Williams in the ACC. But, over that 10 years, the ACC has been the better league top to bottom and won three national championships to KU’s one for the Big 12.

So don’t give me that hoo-ha that Kansas has a better program than Carolina. They are both great. What skews the pooch are those three losses to KU in the three NCAA match-ups, and each one has a story to itself.

At the 2008 Final Four at San Antonio, the Tar Heels were a slight favorite over Kansas after winning both the ACC regular season and tournament and losing only two games all season. But this was the first time Williams faced Kansas, the still-angry KU crowd and all the storylines took away from the game itself.

The Heels played horribly, fell behind by 40-12 in the first half and made a late push that fell short in the 84-68 crusher. Williams (wearing the infamous KU sticker) stayed to watch the Jayhawks win the national championship two nights later, only after Memphis did not foul Kansas with a three-point lead and Chalmers’ dramatic bomb sent the game into overtime.

When the 2012 NCAA brackets came out, Carolina was on another collision course with Kansas in the Midwest Regional, hoping to have John Henson back at full strength from the wrist he sprained in the ACC Tournament. Of course, it got worse after Kendall Marshall went down in the second-round win over Creighton. With back-up point guard Dexter Strickland already sidelined by a knee injury, the Tar Heels were left with freshman reserve Stilman White, who played admirably in the 13-point loss to the Jayhawks in St. Louis.

The committee did it again this season, when it was an even worse scenario for Carolina, which lost two sophomores, one junior and one senior from its 2012 starting lineup that when whole was the only serious threat to Kentucky’s national championship. And the suits sent the Tar Heels to Kansas City (which is like playing Carolina in Greensboro).

By then, UNC had made the NCAA Tournament only due to perhaps Williams’ best coaching job of his 25-year career. Reluctantly, in early February, he scrapped his two low-post offense for a small lineup of four guards and little presence in the paint. The Heels launched and made enough three-pointers to turn their season around and get another NCAA bid, but they went to the Dance living by the long bomb, which was enough to give Williams the hives.

And, yes, they died that way, shooting barely 30 percent for the game and giving in to Kansas’ best half of the tournament thus far. So Carolina under Williams is 0-3 against KU and Self. And, since they will never play in the regular season by mutual consent, it will stay that way until the next time they meet in the NCAA tournament.

With at least five guys 6-9 or bigger next season, Williams will go back to the way he likes to play and, sooner or later, he’ll see his old school again. The NCAA committee seems to like that kind of theater for TV.

Even though, as of this moment, we hate it.

 

All photography in Hoop It Up is provided by Todd Melet.

http://chapelboro.com/hoop-it-up/ford-corners/kansas-kansas-kansas-ugh/

10 Tips for Your Fantasy Football Draft

As the NFL preseason winds down and teams make their final preparations to begin the regular season, Fantasy Football owners everywhere are scrambling for last minute details on their favorite players and teams as they make their own final preparations for the Fantasy drafts.  The draft kicks off the Fantasy Football season and sets the stage for how your team will perform for the remainder of the year; however, the draft is also the point at which some Fantasy owners (or Fowners, as I will call them) may put themselves at the greatest disadvantage. The most common misconception Fowners have about the draft is that a wealth of knowledge about individual NFL players is sufficient preparation to ensure success ; but, the key lies in understanding how the draft works and how to work the draft to your own advantage. Here are 10 tips to make sure that the players left on your roster are nothing short of stellar.  
10.) Know the type of league in which you are playing. The standard league rules for a given website will usually be the most common, but there are many options available to customize your Fantasy league. Two popular choices are “Keeper” and “PPR” leagues. Keeper leagues allow you to keep one or more players from the previous year (or years) on your roster and the rules for keeping players vary based on your individual league guidelines. Being in a Keeper league will influence the way you draft players because this means that one or more of your roster positions will be filled prior to the draft and you must adjust your strategy accordingly. Points Per Reception, or PPR, leagues award an extra point for every reception that a player makes in addition to the points he gets for yardage or scoring. This makes players who catch the ball more valuable, including not only wide receivers, but also tight ends and especially running backs with good hands
9.)  Know the type of draft you are using. In the most common type of draft, Fowners are randomly assigned an order in which to pick their players. If you use a Snake draft, the drafting order is reversed as you alternate rounds to give the person who went last in the first round the first pick in the second round and so on. An Auction draft gives each Fowner a maximum dollar amount to spend  purchasing their players. This means that as long as you are willing to pay top dollar for a player, you will be assured of getting him because this type of draft does not assign owners an order in which they have to pick.
8.) Know the scoring settings for your league. The point value assigned to each statistical category for scoring varies from league to league. Some leagues will assign a passing touchdown 6 points whereas in another it’s only worth 4 points. This means that quarterbacks would be more valuable in the former league than in the latter. The same differences in point value can apply to rushing touchdowns and receiving touchdowns, as well as other statistical measurements for evaluating an on-field performance.
7.) Know your spot in the draft. Obviously, it is useful to know when it is your turn to pick, but it is also helpful to know when and how others in your draft pick in relation to you. The number of teams in a Fantasy league heavily influences drafting as the NFL has a fixed number of players as well as a fixed amount of playing time available to be distributed among the players of a given NFL team. As the number of teams in a Fantasy league increases, so does the demand for high-quality first-team positional players.  
6.) Come to the draft prepared.  There are many websites that offer supplemental information, but there are a few things that are critical. Find a “cheat sheet” that you like, whether you make it yourself or you download it online. Your cheat sheet should rank players by playing position and overall in order of your draft preference. Find ways to keep you informed on injuries because not all websites update the injury status of players for the draft. Team depth charts are also helpful to show which players are likely to get the most playing time.
5.) Pick your kicker last and your defense next to last. Unless you have an insanely high point value assigned to the statistical scoring categories associated with one of these positions, there is no reason to waste any picks before the last 2 rounds on these roster spots. Most Fantasy leagues consist of 8-14 teams. This usually requires just 1 team defense and 1 kicker per Fantasy team, and the odds of not being able to lock down one of the 32 availablein the NFL is unlikely. Yes, some are better than others, but the difference in Fantasy points between team defenses and among kickers is rarely significant enough to sacrifice a pick earlier than the last 2 rounds. 
4.) Know the definition of a sleeper. A sleeper is a player that you pick up in a later round than what their Fantasy value would suggest. Usually these are lesser-known players due for an atypically productive season. The trouble with sleepers is that they are not always a sure bet and some Fowners forfeit critical picks gambling on an unproven player instead of an establishedone in hopes of snagging the next breakout stud. A player is only a sleeper if their Fantasy value outweighs the order in which they were picked. This includes surpassing the value of the other players that you could have chosen instead. Otherwise, it is not a sleeper, but a reach.
3.) Disregard the Bye week. If losing one week means that you are likely to win the rest, it will be well worth it.
2.) Always pick the player with the highest value left on the board. This means taking into account all of the aforementioned tips and carefully weighing your options. I go into a draft not with players that I want in mind which may cause me to reach, but instead only with players that I know I don’t want. For the rest I just try to make an objective decision.
1.) If you don’t know what you’re doing, don’t do it…USE AUTODRAFT. Autodraft is a resource offered by Fantasy Football websites to help people who are not as informed, have a scheduling conflict, or are otherwise unable to attend with their drafts by automatically picking players for them. This formula-based system takes into account certain criteria to ensure that you pick what the computer would consider the next best player available for your lineup. In every league’s draft there is at least one person that leaves everyone else thinking, “What are they doing?!” and by following these guidelines, hopefully it won’t be you.
http://chapelboro.com/columns/miss-fantasy-football/10-tips-for-your-fantasy-football-draft/

In Response to "A Letter to Deems May"

I, too, am a graduate of UNC. I find Dr. Harmon’s letter to Deems May interesting, at best, and honestly he makes a couple of legitimate points. My question to the good Dr. would be why he fails to mention that Butch Davis, as far as I know, was mentioned nowhere in the NCAA findings? That it was, in fact, Holden Thorp that oversaw and approved the tutoring program that led to the academic problems and it is, in fact, Holden Thorp that oversees the Honor Court which absolved some of the players of wrongdoing.

That, coupled with Holden Thorp’s repeated lies and false support for Coach Davis is something that Dr. Harmon also fails to mention. Surely no one with Dr. Harmon’s intelligence can deny any of the facts I’ve posed above.

Do I believe that Holden Thorp intended from day one to remove Coach Davis? Yes, and the facts support it.

Do I believe that Butch Davis knew the breadth and depth of the problems? I don’t know. But Holden Thorp himself said in the news conference that he DID NOT believe Coach Davis knew.

Was he lying???

Deems May is much, much closer to the football program than Dr. Harmon and the majority of the rest of us. And honestly, much like Dr. Harmon writes about Deems, I frankly don’t care if he’s an M.D. or a UNC graduate… the bottom line is that Holden Thorp is a poor leader with very little integrity and questionable decision making capability.

That, in itself, is reason for his removal as the leader of one of the greatest universities in the world.

John M. Brown
MSRA 85

Click To Read Dr. Harmon’s T.W.O. Cents Piece “A Letter to Deems May”.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/the-commentators/in-response-to-a-letter-to-deems-may/

You Can Call Him Jones

A few things you may not know about the new radio Voice of the Tar Heels:

His proper name is Monrovie Jones Angell, IV. That’s on par with Forest Orion Mixon, III, which is Mick’s official moniker, and a lot more eccentric than just Woody Lombardi Durham (the First).

His dad is Monrovie, the Third, but goes by “Rovie” and is a retired Marine Corps officer who now works for the Marine Federal Credit Union in Jacksonville, N.C. Jones never knew his grandfather, Monrovie, Jr., who died when Jones’ father was a teenager. The original Monrovie? Jones hasn’t a clue and needs someone to build him a family tree.

Jones’ mother is Elizabeth Makepeace Angell, who is a retired public a school teacher. Jones’ wife is Elizabeth Martin Angell, who was a public school teacher and is now a literacy specialist at Glenwood Elementary in Chapel Hill. Jones’ mother did not hand down any “EMA” embroidered towels to her new daughter-in-law.

Young Elizabeth is actually three years older than Jones, lived five blocks away in Jacksonville and attended the same high school, but she wouldn’t give the pimply-faced freshman a second look when she was a pretty senior, Class of 1994.

They both went on to UNC – as had Jones’ parents and his sister Molly – but never hung out together there, either, perhaps because Elizabeth was always studying. Jones says the rumor that he made 1600 on his SATs is untrue and his wife is the brains of the family, having made “one grade under an A all the way through school, and she’s still mad about that B-plus.”

They met formally back in Jacksonville, when Jones was a sophomore at Carolina and Elizabeth had already graduated to a teaching job in Raleigh. It was a holiday Cotillion party when they both had dates with other people, but got seated together at dinner.

“Can I call you when we get back?” Jones asked. “Sure,” Elizabeth said, acknowledging that he was finally old enough to be noticed.

They were married (in Jacksonville, of course) in 2003, and Caroline Angell was born in 2008. Elizabeth is now pretty pregnant with child No. 2.

Monrovie IV grew up loving all kinds of sports (especially the Tar Heels and Redskins) but was never good enough to make any of the Jacksonville teams. So he turned to musical theater, beginning as the Artful Dodger in Oliver in the 5th grade and later acting, singing and dancing (in his admitted order of competence) in big spring high school productions such as Mame, 42nd Street and My Favorite Year.

“I was a better actor than a singer,” he said, “and it helped prepare me to be in front of a crowd.” Beginning this fall, he’ll play to the biggest audience in North Carolina.

Jones’ first play-by-play job was during his student internship with the Tar Heel Sports Network, when engineer John Rose asked him to go to Henderson and call “a minor league baseball game” over WIZS-AM, the station owned by the Rose family.

Jones jumped at the chance but when he arrived found it was more “minors playing baseball.” He did that Little League game with the same enthusiasm he has called the College World Series five times in the last six years. By the way, John Rose is now the engineer for the Duke Radio Network, but that has nothing to do with the surprise he pulled on the young intern.

Jones Angell has since called hundreds of Carolina baseball games, dozens of UNC women’s basketball games and few men’s games when Woody was taking a break or off with the football team. The September 3 opener against James Madison in Kenan Stadium will be the first football game he has ever called from the play-by-play chair. No other candidate in the national search lacked such experience.

“That was definitely a big point of discussion during the interview process, and it’s understandable and a valid question,” said the third banana in the UNC broadcast booth for the past six years. “But I really have prepared as if I was going to do the play by play, so with preparation it won’t be a huge change.”

Jones says he will sit in the radio booth and call every scrimmage during preseason practice and then listen and critique the tapes. Certainly, he won’t sound like Woody, but even Woody had an adjustment period taking over from Bill Currie 40 years ago.

The familiarity with Carolina, which Jones has followed closely his entire life, and keeping the same broadcast teams together for both sports trumped the fact that he will have to grow into certain parts of his new role. He is already an employee of the UNC Athletic Department and will remain as involved in the production of the broadcasts and coaches’ shows as he has been for years. Like Woody, he’ll be paid additionally by Learfield Communications to call the games.

Will he have pet expressions that become legendary, such as “Go where you go and do what you do” or “Go to war Miss Agnes” – two of his predecessor’s favorites.

“The way I am approaching it is let’s get it right, be factual and accurate, and tell the story of the student athletes,” he said. “As time goes on and people get to know me and are more comfortable listening to my style, the other stuff will come. Right now I don’t have anything ready to pull out if, say, Harrison Barnes makes a big 3-pointer.”

What he does have, right out of the shoot, is a one-word name that will become a staple for Carolina fans, like Woody. That’s because it’s a middle name that sounds like a last name that he uses as his first name. “Back to you, Monrovie . . .” just won’t cut it.

Best of luck, Jones. We’ll be listening.

Jones, Elizabeth and Caroline Angell with “Lily”
http://chapelboro.com/columns/sports-notebook/you-can-call-him-jones/