UNC @ UVA FB — Listen live now on 97.9 FM UNC Fraud Report Released

New Park And Ride Lot Fees In Place Thursday

CHAPEL HILL – Starting Thursday, drivers who use town-owned park-and-ride lots in Chapel Hill will be required to pay to park before you board buses at the  Carrboro Plaza, Eubanks Road, Southern Village and Jones Ferry lots.

Drivers will have the option to pay $2 per day, $21 per month, or $250 per year.  Permits purchased can be used at any of the four lots.

Chapel Hill Transit Director, Brian Litchfield, says the fees are being implemented to generate revenue to cover operating costs for the transit system.

“Council approved the fees earlier this year, in coordination with UNC implementing fees at their lots, as an attempt to generate revenue for the transit system,” says Litchfield.

According to a Chapel Hill News report, UNC will also operate its own permitting system for employees and students using six university-owned park-and-ride lots.  Permits purchased for any of the four town-owned lots will be honored at the UNC lots as well, which include the Friday Center and Franklin Street.

Litchfield says Chapel Hill Transit has reached an agreement with Triangle Transit to waive fees for those riding the CRX bus at the Eubanks park-and-ride lot.

“Customers that have either a go-pass or a value pass of some nature are able to receive a park-and-ride pass through Triangle Transit.  Triangle Transit customers that are parking there simply need to contact Triangle Transit’s customer service staff, and they’d be able to help them out with that,” says Litchfield.

To make sure the changes in fees are as widely known as possible, Chapel Hill Transit has updated its website, created brochures, and spent more than $100 thousand dollars to install signs and pay stations, hire part-time employees, and repaint the park-and-ride lots.

Click here for more information about all town and UNC park-and-ride lots or to purchase your own permit.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/new-park-and-ride-lot-fees-in-place-thursday/

Park and Ride Fees; Chatham Residents Get Tax Bills; UNC Degrees

CHAPEL HILL – New fees on Chapel Hill’s Park and Ride lots will begin August 15.

The lots affected will be Carrboro Plaza, Eubanks, Southern Village and Jones Ferry. The rates will start at $2 for a daily rate, $21 for a monthly rate and $250 for a yearly rate.

UNC says it will be implementing its own fees for its park and ride lots at the same time, and UNC park and ride permits will be usable in town lots.

XXX

Final graduation numbers are in as 5,845 students received a degree from UNC this year, including 1,327 master’s degrees, 679 professional degrees and 259 doctoral degrees.

8,547 UNC students were recognized on the Spring 2013 Dean’s List, which requires a minimum 3.5 GPA for 12 hours of letter-grade credit.

XXX

Property tax bills for Chatham County residents should be arriving by at least mid-August, with the deadline to pay on January 6.

Some residents may receive real estate and personal property tax bills separately, according to the Chatham County Tax Administrator, Frances Wilson. Tax payers may appeal the personal property tax bill within 30 days of the date listed on the bill, with all residents encouraged to bring questions to 919-542-8250 or 919-542-8260.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/park-and-ride-fees-begin-chatham-residents-get-tax-bills-5845-students-get-unc-degrees/

CH Park & Ride Fees; UNC Graduation Totals; Chatham County Taxes

CHAPEL HILL – New fees on Chapel Hill’s Park and Ride lots will begin August 15.

The lots affected will be Carrboro Plaza, Eubanks, Southern Village and Jones Ferry. The rates will start at $2 for a daily rate, $21 for a monthly rate and $250 for a yearly rate.

UNC says it will be implementing its own fees for its park and ride lots at the same time, and UNC park and ride permits will be usable in town lots.

XXX

Final graduation numbers are in as 5,845 students received a degree from UNC this year, including 1,327 master’s degrees, 679 professional degrees and 259 doctoral degrees.

8,547 UNC students were recognized on the Spring 2013 Dean’s List, which requires a minimum 3.5 GPA for 12 hours of letter-grade credit.

XXX

Property tax bills for Chatham County residents should be arriving by at least mid-August, with the deadline to pay on January 6.

Some residents may receive real estate and personal property tax bills separately, according to the Chatham County Tax Administrator, Frances Wilson. Tax payers may appeal the personal property tax bill within 30 days of the date listed on the bill, with all residents encouraged to bring questions to 919-542-8250 or 919-542-8260.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/ch-park-unc-graduation-totals-chatham-county-taxes/

Carrboro BOA Discusses Parking

CARRBORO – The Carrboro Board of Aldermen began their discussion on the future of parking in the town with a work session largely focusing on how to handle the potential influx to the town’s municipal lots.

“People like to joke when they learn that I’m the Mayor of Carrboro by asking whether I can fix their parking tickets,” says Mayor Mark Chilton. “The answer is, if you mess up so bad that you get a parking ticket in the Town of Carrboro, there is nothing that I can do to help you.”

The abuse of the town’s free lots was one of the largest concerns raised by the Board. Chilton says UNC’s decision to charge $250 for park and ride lots to the University beginning in the fall could cause students, faculty and staff to try and park in one of Carrboro’s lots.

A 2008 study on parking in the town found that around 20 percent of those parking in the municipal lots were parking for more than three hours despite the fact that most town lots have a two hour limit.

But what should the town do to deter people from not using the lots as intended?

One option to help curb illicit use of the town’s free lots is to increase enforcement with the hiring of an on-site attendant. But Aldermen Damon Seils says any enforcement or payment plan must make sense for the town.

“We know that parking and provision of parking costs money,” says Seils. “We know that enforcing parking costs, and especially enforcing copious free parking, costs. It seems to me that the direction that we are going in is actually the costliest way about doing this and it doesn’t come with any of the benefits that we would acquire from another approach.”

Seils specifically cited private towing companies and the Town of Chapel Hill as potential partners in an enforcement plan—neither of which he is particularly fond of.

Another suggested option was for the town to charge for parking. But Aldermen Jacquelyn Gist says that would only make it tougher for local businesses downtown.

I’ll give you a study—just walk down Main Street and talk to the people that own the businesses and ask them if they want you to charge for parking,” says Gist. “Then walk down Franklin Street and ask people why their restaurant is going under, and that will be one of the top two reasons.”

Aldermen Randee Haven O’Donnell adds that free parking also encourages those from the outskirts of town to enjoy some of the restaurants and shops located more centrally in the downtown

“I really support free parking,” says O’Donnell. “For folks who are further out, this is their town too. When we had the Open Streets, a lot of folks came in from north of Homestead [Rd]. How did they get there? They drove—they drove to be on an open street. Check that out.”

Aldermen Sammy Slade introduced a motion which stipulated that the town would formulate a “downtown parking plan” with the town’s stated values as well as the monetary and staff resources that enacting the plan would entail.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-boa-discuss-parking/

CHTC Puts Park And Ride Fee Plan On Hold

CHAPEL HILL- Although no vote was taken on Monday, the Chapel Hill Town Council made it clear: pay-to-park is coming to the park and ride lots.

“I certainly have come to the conclusion that we need to implement this, said council member Jim Ward. “It is not something I would choose to do otherwise, but we need to keep the playing field level for all the park and ride lots.”

As UNC switches to a fee system for its park and ride lots starting this August, Chapel Hill Transit officials say the town needs to follow suit to make sure town-owned lots on Eubanks Road and in Southern Village are not overcrowded.

“If they’re charging a fee and we’re not, most folks are fairly price sensitive and will likely go to the place where there’s not a fee,” said Chapel Hill Transit Interim Director Brian Litchfield. “We already have capacity issues at some of our park and rides that wouldn’t necessarily be able to handle additional folks just coming to them and using them.”

Under the fee proposal, UNC employees will be granted access to both town and university lots. In return, UNC will pay the town about $150,000 annually. The town will sell permits to non-university commuters for prices ranging from $2 per day to $250 each year.

But council members weren’t sure how the changes would affect non-university employees, specifically the 70 or so riders who regularly use Triangle Transit to get to Raleigh or Durham.

Some, including Lee Storrow, said the town should consider subsidizing their parking fees to encourage bus ridership.

“I am 100 percent in support of […] for folks who have an annual pass to Triangle Transit or a weekly pass, offering parking free of charge,” said Storrow. “I think it’s a small enough number that for folks who are making that type of commitment to public transportation in this region, I don’t think they should be required to pay the fee.”

But others argued Triangle Transit should shoulder the burden.

“Effectively, the cost of providing park and ride is part of providing the Triangle Transit service, so somebody’s got to pay for it,” said Matt Czajkowski. “And if it is not the Triangle Transit riders, then let’s have it be Triangle Transit. It is not a trivial amount of money; it’s not a huge amount of money. It’s $17,500.”

The council postponed a vote on the fee plan until Triangle Transit officials have a chance to weigh in.

Once the council approves the fee system, Litchfield told the council Chapel Hill Transit staffers will begin working with neighborhoods adjacent to the park and ride lots to ensure that residential roads don’t become de facto parking lots.

The park and ride fee proposal returns to the council on April 10.

http://chapelboro.com/news/chtc-puts-park-and-ride-fee-plan-on-hold/