UNC Fraud Report To Be Released Wednesday

The 2014 Inter-City Visit, As Told By Aaron Keck: Tuesday Evening

The second and final day of the 2014 ICV wrapped up Tuesday for nearly 100 Orange County residents, including WCHL’s Aaron Keck, who is making his second-consecutive trip with the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce.

This year’s ICV has taken the group to Athens, Georgia, with a stop in Greenville, South Carolina on the way. Athens is a college town much like Chapel Hill-Carrboro with the campus of the University of Georgia abutting the City.

Aaron joined Ran Northam on the WCHL Tuesday Evening News to tell the latest about the trip.

***Listen to the Interview***

 

Have you missed any of Aaron’s updates from Athens?
Monday Morning | Monday Evening | Tuesday Morning | Tuesday Evening

While in Athens, Aaron has also been writing a column.
Dispatch From Athens: Part I | Part II | Part III

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/2014-inter-city-visit-told-aaron-keck-tuesday-evening/

The 2014 Inter-City Visit, As Told By Aaron Keck: Monday Morning

WCHL’s host of Aaron in the Afternoon and the WCHL Evening News, Aaron Keck, made his second-consecutive trip with the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce and almost 100 other Orange County residents for the 2014 inter-city visit.

This year’s journey is to Athens, Georgia–the home of the University of Georgia. But, first, the journey stopped off in Greenville, South Carolina–the home of Furman University.

Aaron joined Ron Stutts on the WCHL Monday Morning News to tell the story of the journey so far.

***Listen to the Conversation***

Have you missed any of Aaron’s updates from Athens?
Monday Morning | Monday Evening | Tuesday Morning | Tuesday Evening

While in Athens, Aaron has also been writing a column.
Dispatch From Athens: Part I | Part II | Part III

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/2014-inter-city-visit-told-aaron-keck-monday-morning/

Poll: Nation On The Wrong Track

North Carolina voters aren’t happy with the direction the nation is headed.

The Civitas Institute is a conservative publication, which conducted a poll in late July. In the release of the poll last week, it stated 70 percent of registered North Carolina voters think the United States are on the wrong track compared to the 20 percent that thinks things are heading in the right direction.

In October 2012, the split was 55-40, with the majority still believing the nation wasn’t in the right place.

The number one issue voters said they were concerned about was the economy. In a close second was jobs and unemployment, followed by immigration, health care, and the current government.

Neither political party had the upper hand in the poll. When voters were asked which candidate they would vote for if the election for Congress was held on that date, 43 percent said the Republican and 43 percent said the Democrat.

And, when asked specifically how President Barack Obama is doing—almost at the midway point in his second term—53 percent disapprove while 45 percent approve.

To see a complete breakdown of the poll, click here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/national/poll-nation-wrong-track/

Unemployment Up For Second Time In Three Months

Unemployment claims climbed in July both nationally and in North Carolina, marking the second increase in the state since June 2012.

Nearly 20,000 fewer people were employed from June to July, according to the state’s Department of Commerce. However, jobless claims didn’t greatly rise, showing a 0.1 percent increase to 6.5 percent might not be telling the whole story. Only about 5,300 more people claimed to be without a job in July.

The numbers are still greatly improved from the previous year. In July 2013, 8.1 percent of the state’s population claimed to be unemployed.

Nationally, the shift went from 6.1 to 6.2 percent which is 1.1-percent better than a year ago.

The county-by-county figures are scheduled to be released August 27.

To see the complete breakdown of the state and national unemployment rate for July, click here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/unemployment-first-time-two-years/

Congressman David Price To Visit WCHL Studios Tuesday

Members of Congress are on a five-week recess, and your Representative, David Price, is taking some of his time to stop by the WCHL Studios and talk about the top issues being debated in Washington.

Congressman Price is a native of eastern Tennessee and made his way to Mars Hill College and UNC, where he was a Morehead Scholar. He also studied at Yale University where he received a Bachelor of Divinity as well as a Ph.D. in Political Science. Congressman Price spent additional time in the classroom as a professor at Duke University in 1987 teaching Political Science and Public Policy.

Now Congressman Price serves North Carolina’s Fourth District and is on the House Appropriations Committee. He serves as the Ranking Democrat on the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, which oversees funding for the Department of Homeland Security.

Congressman Price recently announced that North Carolina will receive an added $1.1 million in grant funding from the Department of Homeland Security, compared to last year. That work was done through the Appropriations Committee. He and Wisconsin representative Tom Petri, a Republican, announced a bipartisan NCAA financial transparency bill in the heat of heavy intercollegiate athletics discussions.

Congressman Price will also weigh in on foreign affairs as the conflict between Israel and Hamas continues as well as the United States’ recent air strikes on Iraq.

Tune in to the WCHL Afternoon News with Aaron Keck Tuesday when Congressman Price will sit down with Aaron for the entire 4:00 hour to discuss timely topics of local, national, and international importance.

http://chapelboro.com/news/national/congressman-david-price-visit-wchl-studios-tuesday/

CANCELLED: VA Amber Alert Warns NC Of Abducted Son

Originally posted 1:46 p.m., August 6, 2014

Officials cancelled the Amber Alert Wednesday when Tommy Lee Able Engle was found in Pikeville, Kentucky, according to WUSA. His father was taken into custody.

Officials from Virginia are warning North Carolina residents of an Amber Alert after a father abducted his three-year-old son and threatened to take both their lives Monday.

Tommy Lee Travis Engle is wanted in connection with the abduction of his son, Tommy Lee Able Engle. The father is a six-foot-three-inch white male, weighing approximately 200 pounds and has brown eyes and brown hair.

He is thought to be driving a navy blue 2001 four-door Dodge Neon with Virginia license plate WNZ-9169.

Officials are warning everyone to use caution if they encounter this man because he may have an AK-47 assault rifle. The Amber Alert release states that he made suicidal threats and homicidal threats toward police officers.

Anyone with information should dial 911 immediately. You can also call Crime Stoppers at 919-942-7515.

http://chapelboro.com/news/crime/va-amber-alert-warns-nc-abducted-son/

OC Ahead Of The State In Overall Child Well-Being?

North Carolina ranks 34th in the nation for overall child well-being, according to the 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book. However, Orange County may be just a little bit ahead of the state all together signs of better times approaching.

“Orange County historically has done a little better on a lot of the indicators than [the rest of] the state, partly because we have a lot more programs than some of the low-wealth counties,” says Nancy Coston, the director of Orange County Department of Social Services. “We also are lucky that we live in a community that is very committed to our families.”

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is a product of the Annie E. Casey Foundation that examines 16 measures of child well-being in four categories: economic well-being, education, health, family and community.

North Carolina was one of the worst ranked states for economic well-being at 38 and performed only slightly better for family and community at 36.

The Tar Heel State was ranked at 32 in the health category and received its highest marks for education at 28.

In terms of what needs improvement, Coston says that poverty’s impact on children is something that will always have a lasting affect.

“That’s one of the things that has been really hard to help families with,” Coston stated, “Especially since around 2008, when the recession affected so many. A lot of our families have not been able to rebound from that. One of the problems is, with lower income families, the economic situation can affect them—it’s much harsher than it is for other families in terms of the impact. And the children feel that—they know that they live in a situation where they cannot have the things that other children have.”

A positive aspect to come of these poverty statistics is that the Orange County government is listening, according to Coston.

“Orange County Commissioners recently have started wanting to have additional conversations about our families living in poverty, and we’ve also seen that in some of the towns where they’re trying to address the housing and other needs of low income families. We know that children need to feel secure in their housing; they need to have no food insecurities, which we know that many of our families experience. So finding ways to make sure that all of that can be mitigated is one of the most important things that we can do here in our community.”

With all of this in mind, is Orange County currently on the rise or the decline?

Coston says she believes that, in terms of economics, the former is happening.

“We are starting to see the availability of jobs picking up, so hopefully, that impact will affect some of our low-income families,” Coston stated.

“We’ve been focusing a lot on employment of the parents, making sure their skills are marketable so that those families can get back in the work force because that is an important step for them and for their children, because we do know that children with working parents tend to do better than children without families who are working. So as the economy improves, hopefully some of that will impact.”

Coston also says there’s another positive trend happening in the form of health indicators that have improved recently in the state with Orange County as one of the leaders.

“I think it will be interesting to see, in the towns and the county, what approaches we can come up with that emphasize ways to help our children who are living in less-than-perfect situations,” Coston stated.

http://chapelboro.com/news/health/oc-ahead-state-overall-child-well/

NC In June: Fewer Employed, Jobless Rate Flat

More than 8,500 fewer people in North Carolina were employed in June compared to May, although the state’s jobless rate remained flat, according to the state Department of Commerce.

North Carolina’s 6.4 percent seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in June is now 0.3 percent higher than the national average and ranks the state tied for 32nd with Alaska. Bordering states South Carolina and Virginia are tied at 17th with 5.3 percent, Tennessee at 36th with 6.6 percent, and Georgia at 44th with 7.4 percent.

Unemployment claims in North Carolina fell by more than 2,100 people from May to June. Over the year, the number fell by more than 89,000 people, dropping the jobless rate from 8.3 percent in June 2013 to 6.4 percent this year.

North Carolina’s unemployment rate saw a small increase in May from its lowest point of 6.2 percent in April. That marked a low of more than five years, dating back to the start of the Great Recession.

County-by-county unemployment rates in North Carolina are scheduled to release July 30. To see the full breakdown of the state’s unemployment rate, click here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/june-fewer-employed-jobless-rate-flat/

Fiber Internet In 2014?

Your days of waiting for videos to buffer or uploading attachments may be over soon as competition is growing for which data provider is going to offer internet speeds up to 100 times faster than your current provider.

AT&T announced Thursday that it would join Google and Time Warner Cable in providing cities in the Triangle and Winston-Salem one-gigabit speeds through their fiber-optic internet services.

“AT&T already has a large fiber footprint in the region—that’s one of the reasons it made it such an attractive partner,” says Marc Hoit, the Vice Chancellor for Information Technology at N.C. State and a spokesperson for the North Carolina Next Generation Network (NCNGN). “With that, they have the ability to jump start and do things faster. We’re hoping some of those connections start before the end of this year.”

The towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro along with UNC agreed in January of last year to join four other municipalities and three other major universities to ratify NCNGN. According to its website, NCNGN is a “regional initiative focused on stimulating the deployment of next generation broadband networks in North Carolina.” It’s also comprised of Durham, Cary, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem; Duke and Wake Forest round out the group.

gizmodo_internet_speeds

Courtesy of Gizmodo

According to Gizmodo, a design and technology blog, the Triangle averages internet speeds between 10.9 and 14.6 megabits per second. The ultra-high-speed internet option of one-gigabit per second would be 70-100 times greater than those averages.

“If you think of how long it takes to download a movie or if you’re doing education content with the university and doing streaming, some of the things that you want to do with offsite stuff like Google Apps and Documents and Microsoft SkyDrive and download music and your save your music up in the cloud, if you have a one gig file and you’re up at a gig, it takes a second,” Hoit says.

Hoit says NCNGN sees ultra-high-speed internet changing the world of medicine.

“We’re hoping to see things like medical diagnostics live, hi-resolution video used for medical services or for other types of services that you can do diagnostics and use that high-speed stream,” Hoit says.

Another positive aspect of fiber-optic internet is downloading and uploading speeds are the same. With Google fiber or AT&T U-verse with GigaPower, you could receive or send files big and small in almost no time. For example, you could download a full-length, high-definition movie in about 30 seconds.

“The symmetric version is really important from our standpoint, because as you want to work with all these new services that people are doing and putting your music in the cloud; if somebody’s in a studio and creating music and then wants to put it up and to be served somewhere else, you need that upload speed just as much,” Hoit says.

Google offered its first fiber-optic internet service in Kansas City, Missouri in 2012. It later expanded to Provo, Utah and Austin, Texas. In mid-February, the internet giant announced it was considering Triangle cities as places to expand the ultra-high-speed option.

Time Warner Cable said last year that it plans to extend the next level of service sometime in the near future.

Of course, the prices for these ultra-high speed options could be higher. Google fiber in Kansas City is selling its product at $70 per month for internet alone. It is, however, currently waiving its $300 construction fee to customers who sign up.

“Our expectation is to be priced similar to what you’re seeing in Kansas City and in Austin,” Hoit says. “The price depends on the costs and other things, but it should be very close to that same price.”

The next step for the municipalities and universities within NCNGN is to review the terms and agreements of the plan to continue the process.

Carrboro elected officials will likely vote in mid-May on the plan; Chapel Hill leaders have not decided on a date when they will vote on the plan. However, Hoit says the next step should be fairly seamless.

“It’s been a two, two-and-a-half year process of which the municipalities and the universities have been working together through this whole time,” Hoit says. “It will hopefully not come as a surprise. The municipal lawyers have all been involved, so there’s been a lot of collaboration that we’re hoping everything goes smoothly.”

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/fiber-internet-2014/

State Unemployment Rate Hits Five-Year Low In January

North Carolina’s unemployment rate marked its lowest point in nearly six years this January, according to the North Carolina Department of Commerce.

In the first month of the new year, the jobless rate fell 0.2 percent compared to the month prior and 2.1 percent from the year before.

The numbers reflect true improvement from between December and January with more than 17,000 people claiming new jobs while more than 11,000 people no longer claimed to be without employment.

North Carolina’s unemployment numbers are just about even with the national level of 6.6 percent.

The state’s unemployment rate of 6.7 percent marks the lowest point since November 2008, which was in the middle of a five-percent increase in about a year and a half.

The county-by-county unemployment rates are scheduled to be released this Friday.

Click here to see the unemployment rate release.

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/state-unemployment-rate-hits-five-year-low-january/