Chapel Hill Hosts Triangle Entrepreneurship Week Events

CHAPEL HILL – For the first time, Triangle Entrepreneurship Week is coming to Chapel Hill. The event, now in its third year, hosts local leaders, investors, supporters and entrepreneurs, offering a time to network and share knowledge.

Dina Mills, Program Manager at the LaUNCh Chapel Hill business incubator, explains that Triangle Entrepreneurship Week used to hold events only in Raleigh and Durham.

“It’s really important for the entrepreneurial community because it shows the growing importance of Chapel Hill as a place for start-ups,” Mills says.

Activities across the Triangle run till the 13th, with a full day of events going on at both LaUNCh and its sister incubator, 1789, on Tuesday. The Town of Chapel Hill and Innovate @ Carolina are sponsors.

“In the morning [at LaUNCh], we will start a session on pitching and investors, and then we have a session on how your company can change the world, followed by a panel discussion with a number of lawyers who specialize in start-up law,” Mills says

Last year, TEW brought together more than 2,000 local entrepreneurs, and business owners attended 26 events in the area.

“Lots of great connections have been as a result of it, and that’s why we are really pleased to have it in Chapel Hill this year,” Mills says

Events are open to the public. For a schedule of events, click here.

 

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/chapel-hill-hosts-triangle-entrepreneurship-week-events/

UNC Grad Making Noise In Local Music Scene

Photo Courtesy: Catie King

CHAPEL HILL – Musician, entrepreneur and UNC alum Catie King has forged music and business together in a way that serves the community. King’s venture, Resound Magazine, is the final feature of our LaUNCh Chapel Hill summer series.

Check out Kings’ song, “Maybe Tonight,” on her second album Catch and Release.

When King isn’t working on her music, the Raleigh Native is busy in LaUNCh growing Resound Magazine, a national network of locally focused digital music magazines run entirely by student journalists.

“The way I like to put it is the local music scene here, and it seems in other localities, is that it is over-fragmented and under-served. Resound serves as the connective tissue between all of the parties participating in local music to create a dynamic, to create a dialogue, external and internal,” King said.

King said the Chapel Hill/Carrboro area has a flourishing music scene, but as an emerging artist, she had a hard time finding outlets to share her music.

“I thought about how it took a year and half to get my album reviewed by the Daily Tar Heel, and that seems a little ridiculous. And I still haven’t gotten a single play on XYZ [WXYC] which is a frustration shared by most UNC student [musicians]. Also with my experience of trying to find other musicians and other venues to play in, finally giving you the time of day so you can book a show. I was sitting back and trying to figure out why it took so long,” King said.

King wrote on the magazine’s web site that “every city has a soundtrack. It’s our job to play it.”  The magazine features traditional media coverage of the local music community, including news, reviews, and interviews in addition to multimedia and social content. King said she is launching the next branch of Resound Magazine at the College of Charleston and plans to add more colleges across the country in the coming months. She said she has a particular interest in colleges with music business programs.

 

The passion for music has always been there, King said, but she laughed about her road to becoming an entrepreneur, saying she stumbled “face first” into it. King, who graduated from UNC in May with a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations and a minor in etrepenuership, took a course a couple of years ago called “Launching the Venture.” The class was taught by Ted Zoller, who oversees LaUNCh and serves as the Director of the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at UNC Kenan-Flagler.

“Without that course, I have no idea what I would be doing right now. It has connected me with dozens of important local entrepreneurs and experts. I have the materials and the know-how to be able to execute on the idea. I didn’t have that a year ago,” King said.

King launched Resound in April of 2012, and when the opportunity to be a part of LaUNCh Chapel Hill came about this past spring, she knew it would lead to great opportunities for growing her venture.

“I think the best part about, especially being around such young minds, is it gives you a sense of possibility that you don’t have otherwise,” King said. “You feel unhinged and able to dream past your original vision. I try to get in here as early as I can everyday to try to convince myself that I have a real job and everyone keeps asking me, ‘When are you going to get a real job?’ And I hope that’s the question for decades to come.”

If her world weren’t already busy enough, she released her third album, Suspended EP, in May. This month King returned from a trip to Los Angeles, California, where she met with a record executive in the music industry and also explored opportunities to expand Resound.

You can catch King live on August 29 as part of the Oak City 7 concert series in Raleigh.

 

Hear the radio version of this story below:

http://chapelboro.com/news/entertainment/unc-grad-making-noise-in-local-music-scene/

UNC Grad Is Changing Doctor Accessibility

Photo Courtesy: Keona Health

CHAPEL HILL – We all try to avoid doctor visits as much as we can, but sometimes it’s urgent, and we need answers quickly.

UNC graduate Oakkar Oakkar developed an innovative software program, Keona Health, which he says will help you reach your doctor online. As part of our summer series on young entrepreneurs in Chapel Hill, Oakkar’s start-up is this week’s featured venture from the business incubator LaUNCh Chapel Hill.

“We actually help the practices to put down the phone so that they can actually focus on direct patient care. We provide the patient with an intelligent way to report the symptoms using the web and mobile. We extract the health history directly from their health record,” Oakkar says.

According to an article in the Wall Street Journal featuring Keona Health, patients are phoning their doctors more than ever. Phone calls to physician practices have increased between 25 and 50 percent since 2008. Doctor’s offices and hospitals are struggling to manage the calls. 

This is where Keona Health comes in. The program offloads phone calls onto to the clinic’s website, tracking and organizing each inquiry, helping the patient report their question.

“What we have is something personalized, something very meaningful about you and your healthcare,” Oakkar says. “Every single encounter is reviewed by your own provider before they get back to you.”

 

Oakkar, 34, graduated from UNC in the spring with a Master’s in Clinical Informatics. Continuing his education, though, was not the only reason he came to Chapel Hill.

He was born in Burma and later moved to Hawaii. When he was 19, he moved to Honolulu to attend the University of Hawaii. Years later, he had the idea for Keona Health, which means God’s gracious gift in Hawaiian. He wanted to develop the start-up simultaneously while going back to school, so Oakkar applied to both UNC and Duke.

“Duke accepted me first, and then when I got interviewed at UNC, they were like, ‘Hey, you are an entrepreneur? If you come here, we will actually nourish your idea in developing your company. We can get you some funding from the National Institute of Health and then spin off a company from here.’”

After hearing what Carolina had to offer, he turned Duke down.

Oakkar then met with Javed Mostafa, the Director of the Carolina Health Informatics Program, who eventually played a vital role in kick-starting Keona Health. Mostafa spoke with Oakkar about Chancellor Thorp and his entrepreneurship initiatives at UNC.

“I was just so hooked. I was like, ‘Alright. Sign me up!’ And the next day, before I even started school, we founded a company.”

Chancellor Thorp put Oakkar in touch with his cousin Dr. John Thorp, Professor and Director of UNC Women’s Primary Healthcare, and Judith Cone, special assistant to the chancellor for innovation and entrepreneurship.

Keona Health then received $150,000 in funding from the NIH and since has received an additional $550,000 from other government grants and early-stage investors.

Current partners and customers include UNC Obstetrics and Tulane University. Oakkar says the company is also in talks with Columbia University Hospital and North Shore-LIJ.

He just partnered with Allscripts Healthcare Solutions, Inc., and the Keona Health app will be featured in the Allscripts app store. Oakkar says it could be a multi-million dollar opportunity.

“We have all these top-leading hospitals in the pipeline, so we are going to be in a different stage and a different stage of the company in a few months,” Oakkar says.

Oakkar says health care is moving into the digital age, and he is riding on top of the wave.

http://chapelboro.com/news/health/launch-profile-keona-health-is-changing-doctor-accessibility/

LaUNCh Profile: STENCIL Aims To Lower Drop Outs

Pictured: Wooten; photo courtesy STENCIL

CHAPEL HILL – Close to 13,500 high school students dropped out of North Carolina public schools in 2012, according to state records.  UNC graduate Julian Wooten developed innovative software program, STENCIL, which he says will help lower that number.

As part of our summer series on young entrepreneurs in Chapel Hill, Wooten‘s start-up, STENCIL, is this week’s featured venture from the business incubator LaUNCH Chapel Hill.

Through tracking data, STENCIL, or Students and Teachers Employing New Criteria in Learning, can alert teachers, administrators and parents if a student is likely to drop out. It takes into account patterns like frequent absents, GPA’s below a certain mark, and excessive disciplinary incidents.

“In addition to helping manage student information, it also has an algorithm that predicts if a student will drop out of school. That was the original incarnation of STENCIL,” Wooten says.

During his own collegiate studies, which included summer teaching stints and internships, Wooten says he was troubled by a statistic he came across: one out of every four high school students will drop out.

As Wooten crafted STENCIL, he realized it could be more than just an algorithm.

“I thought, ‘Why don’t we develop this to be an analytics suite so we can do more?’ We can track what students are learning and what needs to be re-taught. We can also tweak the algorithm to not just being drop-out prevention, but also if a student is just in trouble academically.”

STENCIL is launching pilot programs in August at the North Carolina School of Science and Math and the UNC School of Public Health for its leadership program. Wooten says there’s been interest from public schools in the state as well.

Wooten, who graduated in 2008 with degrees in biology and chemistry, credits a UNC entrepreneurship competition for helping to kick start STENCIL in 2011.

“Actually, my business was born out of the Carolina Challenge,” Wooten says. “If I didn’t have all of these tools here, we probably wouldn’t have been able to start as fast as we have and to also be as far along as we’ve come. It’s amazing.”

Wooten, in addition to running STENCIL, went back to school for a graduate certificate in Nanomedicine and is now pursuing his MBA from the Kenan-FlaglerBusinessSchool.

He says the local efforts of business incubators like LaUNCh Chapel Hill are already making an impact on the entrepreneurial ecosystem in the Triangle.

“The great thing now is that there is so much energy. There are so many people excited. There is so much visibility. There’s so much networking going on now,” Wooten says. “And a lot of those big ideas that you see in Durham and Raleigh, a lot of the people have come from Chapel Hill.”

Wooten has already had a big year in funding and recognition. He was named as one of the Top 40 Under 40 Entrepreneurs in the Triangle, and in February, won the 2013 Governor’s Emerging Issues Prize for Innovation. Gov. Pat McCrory presented him the award.

 

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/launch-ch-business-profile-stencil-aims-to-lower-student-drop-out-rate/

1 Million Cups Gives Local Entrepreneurs Networking Opportunities & More

CHAPEL HILL – As part of a continued effort to foster the entrepreneurial environment in the area, there’s a program called 1 Million Cups that offers networking opportunities and much more. Each week, two local business venturists present their start-ups to a diverse audience of mentors, advisers and fellow entrepreneurs. The program meetings alternate between the LaUNCh Chapel Hill business incubator and RTP Headquarters in Durham.

Dina Mills, the Program Manager at LaUNCh, is one of the organizers for our local 1 Million Cups branch.

“People are enjoying other entrepreneurs and hearing about what they are doing,” Mill says. “They are getting feedback on their business, and also, just great connections are being made.”

1 Million Cups is “caffeinated,” or funded by the Kauffman Foundation, one of the largest supporters of entrepreneurship in the country, funding activities around the world. 1 Millions Cups has member cities across the country.

 

One of the presenters Wednesday was Ann Johnston, founder of Local Ventures, a website for small businesses to find and connect with reputable local vendors.  Johnston, who graduated from UNC in May, works out of the 1789 incubator, a feeder to LaUNCh.

Johnston’s vision for Local Ventures grew out of UNC’s JNO Venture Competition. She says the company received $8,500 in funding, the largest sum awarded to date.

“With this presentation now, a couple more people know what we’re doing, and they will tell their network,” Johnston says. “Word of mouth is huge; it’s really important. Without support from the community—we don’t have tons of marketing dollars we can just throw around. Things like this are really helpful to us.”

Besides the valuable networking opportunities, Mills explains that 1 Million Cups now offers the chance for companies to gain national attention as well.

“Today, we are actually doing our first submissions as part of 1 Million Cups. We will have the opportunity to be on Dream Big America which is a new national radio show. We are hoping to have some of our companies profiled in front of 3.5 million radio listeners,” Mills says.

If you have presented at a 1 Million Cups function, Mills says this qualifies you for consideration to be submitted. Program organizers will then pick nominees from the pool of previous presenters.

1 Millions Cups happens every Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m and is open to the public. For information on becoming a presenter, click here.

 

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/1-million-cups-gives-local-entrepreneurs-networking-opportunities-caffeine-more/

LaUNCh Incub. Profile: New Social Network Coming

CHAPEL HILL – Social media has revolutionized the way many of us interact with each other. UNC sophomore Taylor Robinette has an idea in the works which he says will combine your online social network with your real life interactions. As part of our weekly series on young entrepreneurs, Bevii, Robinette’s start-up, is this week’s featured venture from the business incubator LaUNCH Chapel Hill.

“There’s your social network and there’s your actual network,” Robinette says. “This [Bevii] blurs the lines between the two. It makes it so you never have to add anybody again; there’s no searching for people and then accepting and denying friend requests.”

Robinette, at just 19, already has $110,000 in the bank from investors, another $90,000 pledged, and hopes to raise another $500,000 in the next couple of months. The first version of Bevii is set to launch in October, just before he turns 20. It will be available to students at UNC, Duke, and N.C.State.

Robinette designed Bevii to be an improved alternative to Facebook. It’s a mobile, location-based social network through iOS and Android cell phone apps. It will track your offline interactions and try to mimic them online by seeing whom you spend time.

“So the way this would work, the example I always use is if you go to a party or a gathering, everybody there would be added to your network at a base-level; so without you having to search for them they would automatically be added to your network,” he said. “Then you would be able to see things like their profile picture, where they work, or where they go to school.”

Robinette explains if you hit it off with someone and begin spending more time together, you will get more access to their network.  If you never see the person again, they will drop out of your network.

“It’s kind of creating this idea of a dynamic, constantly changing social network,” Robinette says.

Robinette currently has a development team of seven under him. Post-LaUNCh, he has high hopes for the future of Bevii.

“We will probably look to raise another $10-15 million at the eight-to-twelve month mark, and at that point it will allow us to pay full salaries for a full staff,” he says.

The Maryland native says he has always aimed at becoming an entrepreneur.  As just a freshman in high school, he had the idea that social media could be better, so he started a social networking site for fun. In the first month, the site had 250,000 members.

Robinette explains the networking connections and resources LaUNCh offers has helped accelerate his start-up.

“So I got here [LaUNCh] and really took advantage learning from Jim Kitchen, Ted Zoller, and all of the people in the business school. Through them, I met my lead investor who started us out with $75,000 and started us out through the first round of funding.”

Robinette says the efforts of LaUNCh and its feeder and fellow incubator, 1789, are reinvigorating the entrepreneurial community in Chapel Hill.

“That’s one of the reasons I decided to go to school instead of just moving out to the Silicon Valley to get my company started. I want to help create a better entrepreneurial culture elsewhere besides the Valley,” Robinette says. “Working with other people to try to make UNC more attractive to other young entrepreneurs I think is really important and cool.”

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/launch-incubator-profile-a-new-social-network-coming-soon/

1789 Incubator Profile: Behind The Scenes With Filmlab

Pictured: Thomas directing a mobile app commercial

CHAPEL HILL – UNC alum Nicholas Thomas is the owner and creator of Filmlab, a video production company operating out of the 1789 business incubator in Chapel Hill. He’s this week’s featured young entrepreneur as part of our weekly summer series on the ventures of 1789 and LaUNCh Chapel Hill.

Thomas has produced content for many organizations on UNC’s campus.  He’s working on a project currently for The CUBE, a program that’s a part of Innovate@Carolina.

 

The 1789 business incubator, which launched in May, is already generating local buzz, not only because of the innovative young entrepreneurs setting up shop there, but also because of it’s unique office design.

“The space is really cool. The view is the best on Franklin Street, and it helps you get work done because it’s hard to be cooped up,” he said. “When you have a space with arcade games and a ping-pong table, all that helps to build community because people can rally around that.”

And that community is one that Thomas says has helped him to thrive. He’s able to share ideas with other venturists coming from a diverse range of backgrounds.

“Just for an example yesterday, somebody who is doing a totally different venture—she had a question about Adobe Illustrator. She was like, ‘Hey Nick, how do you do this?” And I was able to just come over and help her for a few seconds.”

The former junior varsity basketball player majored in Management and Society with a business minor, but he always knew his passion was for telling other people’s stories. He has also produced the promotional video for company, Tripstr, a website where travelers can place to share travel experiences and recommendations.

“I’m passionate about working with start-ups, other entrepreneurs, and tech companies which in RTP, it’s become a huge trend for a lot of these companies to grow here.”

1789 participants hope to move on to the LaUNCh Chapel Hill incubator, which is geared toward the more developed businesses.

Before venturists can move to the next level, though, they have to complete the Joe Start Up initiative, an educational program which helps them to formulate a business plan and also network with other entrepreneurs. It was created by Chris Mumford, who also co-founded LaUNCh with Jim Kitchen.

Thomas says Mumford has helped him realize what he can achieve if he works hard.

“He said to us, ‘I hope that you guys are so successful that you skip LaUNCh and you go get your own office space. I think that would be really cool to get my own office space—not as big as this one [1789] obviously,’” Thomas said, laughing.

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/1789-incubator-profile-behind-the-scenes-with-film-lab/

1789 Incubator Is Open And Ready For Business

CHAPEL HILL – 1789 is the newest business incubator to open in Chapel Hill. It’s geared toward Carolina students and recent graduates, with the goal of supporting the area’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. Following in the footsteps of Launch Chapel Hill, it will act as a feeder to its predecessor. Young entrepreneurs are already moving in to the space, with innovative ideas in the works.

UNC alum Aaron Scarboro has played a key role in getting 1789, which has arguably the coolest office space in Chapel Hill, up and running.

“We really want to be able to create an impact on the entrepreneurial community in the Triangle. We think we are filling a pretty big niche here. Launch is for the later-staged companies, and we are trying to focus on encouraging students who may have never thought of themselves as entrepreneurs before.”  Scarboro said.

 

Named for the year when UNC was founded, 1789 is located above Four Corners and is replete with conference tables, a kitchen, sitting areas, and private phone booths. For times when venturists want a creative break, there’s a ping-pong table and arcade game machines. Scarboro explained it took a lot of work to get the space ready for business.

“The floor was dirty, walls and windows were all dirty and grimy,” Scarboro said. The windows were broken and had bars over them—it was an absolute wreck. Over the course of about three months, we did a great job of renovating it, and it is an awesome space now.”

1789 also has one of the best views in town, with wide, open windows looking onto Franklin Street.

“The idea behind 1789 was that this was going to be a workspace for students and graduates to come and be able to work on an idea. We didn’t want people closed off in their own office space. We definitely wanted ideas to be thrown around and people to interact with each other. We do have some private spaces but really we wanted an open collaborative space,” Scarboro said.

After overseeing the renovation process, Scarboro then transitioned into an administrative role. He says local businessman and philanthropist Jim Kitchen had the vision for 1789 and was also heavily involved in LaUNCh Chapel Hill. After just a few months, 1789 is currently home to eight business ventures, from fair trade clothing makers to video production specialists.

Chapel Hill native Mary Elizabeth Lovelace worked closely with Scarboro to open 1789.

“It’s been really exciting to see it transform from a space under construction to a working venture lab,” Lovelace said.

Lovelace graduated from the University of Richmond. She did not have access to a program like this during her college years, so she has enjoyed seeing the venturists take advantage of a great opportunity.

“It is awesome to watch the entrepreneurial ecosystem grow in Chapel Hill because it wasn’t like this five years ago. There’s been so much to increase it, and 1789 is a huge part of that,” Lovelace said.

She explained that all a student needs to get involved with 1789 is a viable idea and willingness to take risks.

“It is really exciting to see the students get fired up about their ideas and the possibilities within those ideas,” Lovelace said.

Senior Kailey Izzard is an entrepreneurship minor at UNC and is interning with 1789.

“I always had a passion for entrepreneurship so I thought I might start my own business one day. I starting interning here [1789] and realized that I love managing people who are starting their own businesses to help them turn it into something real,” Izzard said.

Scarboro said he is working to recruit new ventures for the fall and also looking for business experts to mentor the young entrepreneurs.

“Hopefully we will be able to recruit mostly through word of mouth, through our interns, and our current ventures talking to people about it. We hope to generate a buzz on campus,” Scarboro said.

For more information on how to apply for the program, click here.

 

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/1789-incubator-is-open-and-ready-for-business/

1789 Incubator Fosters Young Entrepreneurs

Photo Courtesy: 1789

CHAPEL HILL – 1789 is not just the year UNC was founded—it’s the newest business incubator to open in Chapel Hill. It’s geared towards Carolina students and recent graduates, with the goal of supporting the area’s entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Following in the footsteps of Launch Chapel Hill, which opened in May– 1789 will act as a feeder to its predecessor.

Launch nurtures the more advanced businesses that are ready to seek funding— whereas 1789 is about developing young entrepreneurs and assisting them in the early stages of their business ventures.

1789 was recently recognized by Friends of Downtown Chapel Hill at the organization’s monthly meeting.

“When they have to leave 1789, they will be going over to Launch, and we will then—once Launch launches them—we then, hopefully, will have them a businesses in Chapel Hill,” said Pat Evans, Chair of the Friends of Downtown Chapel Hill.

Evans says there are currently 15 start-ups working there now.

The facility, located above Four Corners on Franklin Street, offers multiple small and large working spaces, a 20 seat bar, and conference rooms.

Mentors for the program include faculty and staff from the UNC Center for Entrepreneurial Studies and the Kenan-Flagler Business School. Partner the program include the Town of Chapel Hill, Innovate Carolina, and the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership.

http://chapelboro.com/news/development/1789-incubator-fosters-young-entrepreneurs/

Thorp: Be Confident In Future Of Town-Gown Relations

Pat Evans opens Thursday’s meeting of the Friends of the Downtown.

CHAPEL HILL – Outgoing UNC Chancellor Holden Thorp has long been recognized for having ushered in a new era of improved town-gown relations in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro community.

With his time at Carolina coming to an end next month, local leaders have expressed some concern about the future—but Thorp says he has every reason to believe that incoming chancellor Carol Folt will pick up right where he left off.

“So far Carol Folt and I have not had a conversation where we disagreed about anything,” he said at Thursday’s meeting of Chapel Hill’s Friends of the Downtown. “I believe she’s an academic first…she’s worked on behalf of Hanover, New Hampshire (while serving as interim president of Dartmouth College); she knows that the relationship with the community is important, and I have no reason to believe that she will change that.”

Thorp and his wife Patti were the guests of honor on Thursday: dozens of local officials and downtown leaders gathered at the Franklin Hotel to recognize their work to improve the town-gown partnership, both before and during his time as chancellor.

“They have done so much for the town,” said Friends of the Downtown chair Pat Evans, “working with the University and the Town together in a way that ‘town-and-gown’ has not been done before.”

Signs of that partnership include closer collaboration on real-estate projects like 123 West Franklin (the soon-to-be-former University Square); joining forces to promote start-up businesses with projects like LAUNCH Chapel Hill; working together to address the student-housing crunch and its effect on nearby neighborhoods; and—perhaps most notably of all—sharing responsibility for the ongoing Carolina North project, as well as the infrastructural improvements that project will require.

And amidst all his accomplishments as chancellor, Thorp says he’s particularly proud of that improved relationship.

“The work that we have been able to do with this community and on behalf of the town is among the most rewarding things that I’ve been able to do in my career,” he said Thursday.

And while his departure next month will mark the start of an uncertain new era, Thorp says it shouldn’t be hard to sustain that close partnership—since at the end of the day, ‘town’ and ‘gown’ are really one and the same.

“The first thing about university-town politics that people who work in the University needs to understand is that in a town like this, if the University is at odds with the elected officials in a college town, that means they’re also at odds with their own people,” he says. “This is obvious, but it’s surprising how many people don’t get that…

“It’s a false thing to say ‘the University is at odds with the town,’ because if you’re saying that, then the University is at odds with itself…so the first thing you have to do is not treat it as though ‘the University’ and ‘the Town’–especially here–are two separate things.”

Holden Thorp’s tenure as UNC chancellor comes to an end on June 30; in July, he’ll take over as provost at Washington University in St. Louis.

http://chapelboro.com/news/unc/thorp-be-confident-in-future-of-town-gown-relations/