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North Korea, North Carolina, and a Pulitzer Prize Winning Book

The Pulitzer Prize for fiction was awarded this week to Adam Johnson for “The Orphan Master’s Son” set in North Korea. It is a very timely selection, given our interest in, puzzlement about, and fear of that country. I have revised and updated a column I wrote last year about the book and North Carolina’s connection to North Korea.

Charles Robert Jenkins. Does that name ring a bell?

Jenkins is a North Carolina native whom I have wanted to meet for a long time.

Why?

He knows something first hand about a country that is threatening to send nuclear missiles at our armed forces and at our country’s territory. This strange communist country is led by a hereditary monarchy.

I would like to talk to somebody who knows how North Korea works and how North Koreans think and live. As an outsider living half a world away, I find that this country and its people just do not make sense.

Jenkins, who was born in Rich Square, is one of a very few Americans who have lived for a substantial time in North Korea. While serving in the Korean War, Jenkins surrendered to the North Koreans and wound up living in North Korea for 40 years. As a North Carolina native, he could explain things to me in terms I could understand.

Before the Soviet Union broke up and the Iron Curtain came down, I had the same kinds of questions about life in Russia. Then in 1981, a great crime novel came to my rescue. “Gorky Park” by Martin Cruz Smith followed a Russian detective’s search for the solution to three murders.

The story was gripping, but the best part of the book was its description of how life went on inside Russia. When I finished the book, I had a feel for how people got along day-by-day in that totalitarian system.

Not being able to talk to Charles Robert Jenkins, I have wished for a “Gorky Park” type book set in North Korea.

Now I have one, Adam Johnson’s just announced winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, “The Orphan Master’s Son.” The book introduces us to the novel’s hero, Jun Do, a low level intelligence operative who listens to foreign radio signals from a North Korean fishing vessel. Sometimes the little ship crosses the waters to the Japanese coast and kidnaps ordinary people who will be required to teach North Korean spies how to speak Japanese.

This kidnapping story may seem fanciful. But Charles Robert Jenkins’s wife, whom he married in North Korea, was kidnapped, brought to North Korea, and required to teach Japanese.

In the novel Jun Do and his crewmates kidnap a popular female singer whom they believe will be destined for the entertainment of the Leader or one of his top supporters.

In flashbacks we learn of Jun Do’s growing up in an orphanage, never sure whether he is the son of the orphan master or just one of the many parentless children who are marginalized members of society. As a member of the military, he navigated the network of tunnels under the border into South Korea, opening access for spying and kidnapping there.

We learn how Jun Do was trained to accept torture as a part of the process of disciplining and conditioning to fit in and accept the government’s needs. And we step into the shoes of those who administer torture as a part of reform or punishment.

Did you notice that Jun Do might sound like “John Doe”? It is not an accident. In the early part of the book, Jun Do is the “everyman” of North Korea. Through him a reader sees and feels the ordinariness of the horror that is North Korea.

More horribly though, a reader may come to see how he or she might be able to adapt to live there and accept North Korea’s incredibly bizarre society.

The second half of the book’s story turns fanciful. Jun Do travels to the United States and makes friend and contacts. After his return, he becomes a part of the Leader’s inner circle, falls in love with the Leader’s favorite movie star, and plots to get her to the United States.

If the reader can suspend disbelief, that story is an enjoyable ride.

But what still haunts me is the first part of the book and the terribly believable story of Jun Do that shows how North Koreans really live.

D.G. Martin hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. For more information or to view prior programs visit the webpage at www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/one-on-one/north-korea-north-carolina-and-a-pulitzer-prize-winning-book/

Time To Bring The Bunnies

If you’ve had the pedal to the metal, pushing hard to make sales quotas, production schedules and tax deadlines, I encourage you to take a break for a morale and productivity boosting bit of nonsense. And if you need an off the wall, hoppin’ idea…this one certainly qualifies.
 

Several of the seventeen divisions of The Village Companies, now called VilCom, used to have an annual Bunny Toss. Everyone was invited to bring a chocolate bunny in a box. The event was held on the lawn of McClamroch Hall (right there on Weaver Dairy Road) where bulls eye targets had been drawn on big boards. The goal was to throw your bunny and hit the bulls eye. There were prizes for coming closest to the target, farthest from the target; and for smashing your bunny into the most pieces.
 

Seems to me it could have been called a Bunny Bash.
 

At this point, no one can remember what the prizes were; they just remember that they had a Bunny Blast.
 

If you don’t have time to pull this off before Easter, that’s okay. After Easter may be even better because everyone can buy bunnies on sale.

 

While it is certainly one heck of a silly idea….in the words of philosopher, Ludwig Wittgenstein:
 


 

What kind of silly things go on at your office?
 

Has anything intelligent ever come from it?
 

Please share in Comment section below or write to Jan@Chapelboro.com.
 

Would you like more morale and productivity boosting ideas for April? Get them here.

 

Jan Bolick is Founder and President of Business Class Inc which specializes in working with leaders to build positive, productive, results oriented service culture.

 
http://chapelboro.com/columns/good-business/time-to-bring-the-bunnies/

Carolina Blue in the Strangest of Places

It really is a small world, after all.

Over the last two weeks, I’ve been in Buenos Aires on a business trip and the experience has been fascinating. During my two previous trips to Spain, they won the World Cup and Euro Championship respectively. And lo and behold, the second day of my trip to Argentina, the first pope from the “Western world” was elected – and from where? You guessed it. The celebration was unlike anything I had seen before. For Argentineans, and even those from surrounding countries, the election of Pope Francisco was a monumental occasion.

Amongst all the national pride exhibited during my time here and all the waving blue and white flags, I saw a slightly different shade of blue – in the form of argyle.

I couldn’t believe my eyes. The stereotypical #23 walked down the street toward me. I stopped the man, who only spoke Spanish, and said, “Carolina del Norte?!?” The man, most enthusiastically responded, “Si! Michael Jordan!”

Maybe I wasn’t so far away from home after all.

Later in the week, over lunch with a client, I learned the CFO from Brasil (also in town for meetings) was a graduate of Kenan-Flagler Business School’s MBA program. It was an instant connection. A native of Brasil, he had come all the way to North Carolina and fallen in love with Chapel Hill, Franklin Street and the Tar Heels. He admitted to watching every game he could.

I learned many things during my time here. Among them, how small the world has become. We now consider the scope of community to include more than just Main Street or Franklin Street, but to also include the world. We are all so interconnected – whether by common circumstances, life experiences, travel, or geography – even if those things are Kenan-Flagler on the hill, or the #23 jersey that hangs in the rafters.

We may leave the Southern part of Heaven, even to head further south. It may take us away for days, months, years – even a lifetime.

But that friendly shade of blue we cannot escape and it cannot escape us. And when you least expect it, it finds you – even in the strangest of places.

Ryan Watts is a Chapel Hill native and recent UNC graduate in Political Science and Business Administration. Now living in Washington DC, he works as a Consultant. You can find him on Twitter @RyanVWatts or at his blog.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/hill-to-hill/carolina-blue-in-the-strangest-of-places/

Parenting Page: Shake That Fist and Lean In

This is a parenting page, about parenting Page. I am a child psychologist and a mother. So I specialize in children, yet I am human, thus I am full of knowledge and yet as full of emotions as any other parent. So I decided to write this Parenting Page since it might be informative and funny for others to take an insider look at a child specialist raising her child. I also wanted to create a way to show Page when she grows up, if she chooses to have children, a real-life view of the experience. I hope you enjoy these stories and musings.


SHAKE THAT FIST AND LEAN IN

This past week the new book Lean In got a lot of attention. I haven’t read it yet but the premise appears to be that in part women still don’t hold more leadership roles because they don’t ‘lean in’ to promote themselves into such positions. Rather women lean back for practical reasons such as planning to raise children, and for personality reasons such as having to handle being disliked and not being comfortable being disliked. To the latter, research shows women in leadership roles are disliked by both genders far more than men in leadership roles. As the mother of a girl this type of thing really gets my attention. I want Page to have every opportunity and it is a reminder to some extent we all create our own opportunities by what we pursue.  I want to raise a strong woman.
 

If parenting her so far is any indication, she’ll be one. She is strong spirited and for years I have always been aware I am trying to keep her behavior in check while not deterring an innate strong will that I hope will help her be a strong woman. As all parents quickly learn, each child is born with a unique temperament that they pop out of the womb with and we had no part in creating. When Page was only about eight months old, and still slithering on her tummy like a little snake, she slithered over to an outlet with a cord plugged in and reached up to grab the cord. I said “no Page” in a firm voice. Keeping great eye contact, she returned quite a glare, raised one fist into the air and shook it at me! It was hilarious! (Though of course I kept my serious parent look and didn’t laugh.) She did that a few times before she could talk to disagree with me, and I found it interesting a creature so small would shake her fist at larger humans. My sister saw her do it and we were laughing, while I noted that it was her ‘Fight the Power!’ fist-shake, and my sister pointing out, “Yea, but right now you’re the power.”

 
… But someday outside forces, or her own internal fears, may be the power she’s fighting. So I never did really discourage the fist shake.
 

Dr. Tina Lepage is the owner of Lepage Associates Solution-Based Psychological & Psychiatric Services, a group practice in S. Durham/RTP. She lives in Chapel Hill with her husband, daughter, and two dogs. www.lepageassociates.com. You can find her on Twitter at @LepageAssoc or at Facebook.com/LepageAssociates.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/dr-tina-lepage/parenting-page-shake-that-fist-and-lean-in/

Fred Applegate Speaks on DPACs "Anything Goes"

Fred Applegate – starring as Public Enemy #13, Moonface Martin, in the upcoming performance of Anything Goes at the Durham Performing Arts Center – took a moment to speak with Ron Stutts of 97.9FM WCHL. Anything Goes runs from March 19-24 at DPAC.
 

Tell us about Anything Goes. What can people expect?

“Well people can expect a really good time,” Applegate says. “It’s Cole Porter music. It’s amazing how many songs from this show you’re going to think you knew before you were born. People think it’s a jukebox musical because all of the songs are so famous and such a part of our culture. There’s a lot of tap dancing, some good comedy, some mistaken identities, and some mixed-up romances, and it all gets solved on a five day cruise from New York to London.”

Winner of three 2011 Tony Awards including Best Musical Revival and Choreography, this production of Anything Goes is sure to astound audiences. The New York Times calls it “MUSICAL-COMEDY JOY” and USA TODAY hails it as “GLORIOUS and EXHUBERANT!”

Anything Goes follows the story of two unlikely couples on a cruise from New York to London. With the help of some singing sailors, clever disguises, Public Enemy #13 (Applegate’s character), and an evangelist turned nightclub singer, Anything Goes proves that sometimes love needs a little push to come out on top. Top it off with musical theater classics such as “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “You’re the Top,” “It’s De-Lovely” and, as the song says, “Anything Goes!”

Applegate plays Moonface Martin, Public Enemy Number 13.

“I just don’t have the heart to make the top ten I guess,” he says, “but it does bother me.”
 

When did you first get started in Show business?

Applegate had his first professional job in 1977. He got the acting bug early in life when he played one of the Siamese children in his local high school’s production of The King and I.

“I thought this absolutely makes sense, and this is exactly what I want to do for the rest of my life,” Applegate says. “I told my father when I was seven that I wanted to be an actor, and he said ‘How do you do that?’ I said ‘I don’t know,’ and he said ‘Well find out!’”

“My parents have always been very supportive. My parents grew up in the Depression. They came out of it wanting my sister and I to do whatever we wanted because they grew up in a world where you couldn’t do whatever you wanted.”
 

You spent a lot of time on Broadway, tell us about some of your experiences and some of your performances.

Applegate says he came to Broadway “kind of late in life.” He lived in California for 25 years doing television (You might recognize him from an episode of Seinfeld in which he fires George from a real estate job. George decides to get revenge by spiking his drink, just as he decides to give George his job back). Although he did both The Sound of Music in 1997 and The Producers in 2003 on Broadway, it wasn’t until he was asked to do Young Frankenstein in 2007 that he moved to New York.

“I thought ‘How many chances, how many bites at the big apple do you get?’ Applegate says.

Since his move Applegate has performed in Happiness at Lincoln Center, Fanny for Encores!, La Cage aux Folles, Sister Act, and now Anything Goes.

“Life on the road is not so easy when you have a family and if I weren’t really enjoying this show so much I would be pretty miserable. These people are great, the cast is wonderful, the show is great, the audiences love it. It’s really worth doing.”
 

Tell us about your family.

Applegate describes his parents as “delightful” and attributes his sense of humor to his mom. He and his wife, Cherie, have been married for 33 years.

“I blame her for that,” he says while laughing. “She says it’s been 12 of the happiest years of her life.”

He has three children: Ben, Meredith and Ethan. His youngest son is studying acting and directing.

“I encouraged them to do whatever they wanted to do,” Applegate says. “If you find something you’re passionate about, it’s worth doing.”
 

Back to Anything Goes

Applegate describes the show as a farce. The show follows a romance between a young man, Billy Crocker, and woman, Hope Harcourt, as they travel from New York to London aboard the S.S. “American.” However, Hope is engaged to a lord and heading to London to be married. Applegate’s character and his sidekick, Erma, try to help Billy derail the marriage and get the multiple couples on board with the people they are “supposed to be with.”

“Over us all is Reno Sweeney, played by the truly extraordinary Rachel York,” Applegate describes. “Reno is a nightclub entertainer who’s entertaining on the ship on her way to London. And she’s in love with the guy who’s in love with the girl who’s going to marry the lord.”

“It keeps getting complicated so it can all get sorted out in the silliest possible way at the end, and on the way we get to sing a catalogue of Cole Porter hits that are all terrific.”

You can find all the info you need on how to see the show at DPAC’s Website. And enjoy the show!

http://chapelboro.com/columns/uncategorized-columns/fred-applegate-speaks-on-dpacs-anything-goes/

Fred Applegate Speaks on DPACs "Anything Goes"

Fred Applegate – starring as Public Enemy #13, Moonface Martin, in the upcoming performance of Anything Goes at the Durham Performing Arts Center – took a moment to speak with Ron Stutts of 97.9FM WCHL. Anything Goes runs from March 19-24 at DPAC.
 

Tell us about Anything Goes. What can people expect?

“Well people can expect a really good time,” Applegate says. “It’s Cole Porter music. It’s amazing how many songs from this show you’re going to think you knew before you were born. People think it’s a jukebox musical because all of the songs are so famous and such a part of our culture. There’s a lot of tap dancing, some good comedy, some mistaken identities, and some mixed-up romances, and it all gets solved on a five day cruise from New York to London.”

Winner of three 2011 Tony Awards including Best Musical Revival and Choreography, this production of Anything Goes is sure to astound audiences. The New York Times calls it “MUSICAL-COMEDY JOY” and USA TODAY hails it as “GLORIOUS and EXHUBERANT!”

Anything Goes follows the story of two unlikely couples on a cruise from New York to London. With the help of some singing sailors, clever disguises, Public Enemy #13 (Applegate’s character), and an evangelist turned nightclub singer, Anything Goes proves that sometimes love needs a little push to come out on top. Top it off with musical theater classics such as “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “You’re the Top,” “It’s De-Lovely” and, as the song says, “Anything Goes!”

Applegate plays Moonface Martin, Public Enemy Number 13.

“I just don’t have the heart to make the top ten I guess,” he says, “but it does bother me.”
 

When did you first get started in Show business?

Applegate had his first professional job in 1977. He got the acting bug early in life when he played one of the Siamese children in his local high school’s production of The King and I.

“I thought this absolutely makes sense, and this is exactly what I want to do for the rest of my life,” Applegate says. “I told my father when I was seven that I wanted to be an actor, and he said ‘How do you do that?’ I said ‘I don’t know,’ and he said ‘Well find out!’”

“My parents have always been very supportive. My parents grew up in the Depression. They came out of it wanting my sister and I to do whatever we wanted because they grew up in a world where you couldn’t do whatever you wanted.”
 

You spent a lot of time on Broadway, tell us about some of your experiences and some of your performances.

Applegate says he came to Broadway “kind of late in life.” He lived in California for 25 years doing television (You might recognize him from an episode of Seinfeld in which he fires George from a real estate job. George decides to get revenge by spiking his drink, just as he decides to give George his job back). Although he did both The Sound of Music in 1997 and The Producers in 2003 on Broadway, it wasn’t until he was asked to do Young Frankenstein in 2007 that he moved to New York.

“I thought ‘How many chances, how many bites at the big apple do you get?’ Applegate says.

Since his move Applegate has performed in Happiness at Lincoln Center, Fanny for Encores!, La Cage aux Folles, Sister Act, and now Anything Goes.

“Life on the road is not so easy when you have a family and if I weren’t really enjoying this show so much I would be pretty miserable. These people are great, the cast is wonderful, the show is great, the audiences love it. It’s really worth doing.”
 

Tell us about your family.

Applegate describes his parents as “delightful” and attributes his sense of humor to his mom. He and his wife, Cherie, have been married for 33 years.

“I blame her for that,” he says while laughing. “She says it’s been 12 of the happiest years of her life.”

He has three children: Ben, Meredith and Ethan. His youngest son is studying acting and directing.

“I encouraged them to do whatever they wanted to do,” Applegate says. “If you find something you’re passionate about, it’s worth doing.”
 

Back to Anything Goes

Applegate describes the show as a farce. The show follows a romance between a young man, Billy Crocker, and woman, Hope Harcourt, as they travel from New York to London aboard the S.S. “American.” However, Hope is engaged to a lord and heading to London to be married. Applegate’s character and his sidekick, Erma, try to help Billy derail the marriage and get the multiple couples on board with the people they are “supposed to be with.”

“Over us all is Reno Sweeney, played by the truly extraordinary Rachel York,” Applegate describes. “Reno is a nightclub entertainer who’s entertaining on the ship on her way to London. And she’s in love with the guy who’s in love with the girl who’s going to marry the lord.”

“It keeps getting complicated so it can all get sorted out in the silliest possible way at the end, and on the way we get to sing a catalogue of Cole Porter hits that are all terrific.”

You can find all the info you need on how to see the show at DPAC’s Website. And enjoy the show!

http://chapelboro.com/columns/uncategorized-columns/fred-applegate-speaks-on-dpacs-anything-goes-2/

Surgery for Back Pain? Think Twice

Back pain can be an enormous obstacle to your daily life. Our spines are so central to every movement we make that any discomfort or pain can make ordinary activities unbearable.

There are numerous causes of back pain, from muscle spasm to disc problems to bone deformities. And there are almost as many kinds of treatments, from massage and acupuncture to steroid injections to surgery.

Our little Nurse Tip page is not big enough to provide an overview of all the treatments for back pain, but it’s important to know that according to the Mayo Clinic and recent studies, surgery helps in only a small percentage of cases and can create complications that can be even worse than the original problem.

Our advice is not to rule out surgery altogether, but to think of it as a last resort after trying every other treatment, starting with the least invasive. New studies have shown that acupuncture is very effective for treating back pain.

 For more information about treatments for back pain, check out these websites: Mayo Clinic webpage & Web MD on acupuncture for back pain 

You can follow Everybody Needs A Nurse on Twitter @ENANurse1

image by ginchyqueendangle via flickr

http://chapelboro.com/columns/jennifer-diane-halloran/surgery-for-back-pain-think-twice/

DPAC's Lord of the Dance

Dancing has never been my forte. For me, just being able to sway to the beat could be considered an accomplishment. So naturally, I’m amazed by anyone who can not only dance, but is so good they can entertain other people!

With that in mind, the Durham Performing Arts Center’s Lord of the Dance created by Michael Flatley is poised to blow everyone away, even if you’re not a good dancer yourself. Lord of the Dance brings together all of the Irish dance, music and folklore that made Flatley so famous for Riverdance — which we all know and love.

But don’t take my word for it, you can check out a clip for yourself:

As you can see, the LOTD performance is just as action packed and has the same non-stop energy you’d expect from a Flatley production. How can you not want to check that out? It’s a totally different experience in person! There’s an explosive vivacity you can’t simply can’t find through a TV screen. You have to see it and, of course, in person you can feel it.

You can find all the info you need on how to see the show at DPAC’s Website. And enjoy the show!

http://chapelboro.com/columns/uncategorized-columns/dpacs-lord-of-the-dance/

Parenting Page: Olive Oil & Baptism

This is a parenting page, about parenting Page. I am a child psychologist and a mother. So I specialize in children, yet I am human, thus I am full of knowledge and yet as full of emotions as any other parent. So I decided to write this Parenting Page since it might be informative and funny for others to take an insider look at a child specialist raising her child. I also wanted to create a way to show Page when she grows up, if she chooses to have children, a real-life view of the experience. I hope you enjoy these stories and musings.

 

OLIVE OIL & BAPTISM (an odd combination…)

 
Rituals are great. They bring families and communities together… and also provide fodder for humor! Especially when marital partners come from different cultures and try to make sense of the way other culture does things.
 
When Page turned one-year-old we went to Greece for two weeks, to baptize Page and have her meet the extended Greek clan (my husband is Greek-American). Page was baptized in the same church that Peter and I did our Greek wedding in, a lovely little church overlooking the ocean. The same priest presided, a real character who told Peter during our Greek wedding ceremony that he could “use to lose a kilo or two,” and during Page’s baptism flirted shamelessly with the Nona (i.e., godmother, who is, in his defense, gorgeous). After beginning with an exorcism (in case Satan was hanging around, he needed to be cast out) and stripping Page down, they poured a ton of olive oil all over her body… yes, you read correctly. In Greece apparently olive oil is part of every occasion. I didn’t know this was going to happen, and I didn’t like that Page was not only now naked and screaming, but also slippery. The priest dunked her three times in a cauldron of water, I cried, and Peter laughed. This is all on video, which Peter says he will explain away as nervous laughter, but I think it’s obvious he found it slightly amusing. However, watching emotional behavior can result in misinterpretation. Anyone who thought I was crying for sentimental reasons would be incorrect, as the Greek baptism was for Peter’s family and not for me, so I wasn’t feeling sentimental about her being baptized. I was crying because Page was crying and reaching for me and I had to wait before I could take her back… (Hey mom, big stranger with robe and massive beard dunking me naked over and over while olive oil drips into my eyes, could I get some help here?!!)
 
When the dunking concluded Page was dressed in her baptism outfit, then there was anointing (more oil), ceremonial snipping of the hair (who the hell knows why, no one there had a good answer for this), circling of the alter three times, and me bowing to and kissing the hand of the Nona. Anyway, Page survived what I refer to as the ‘baptism trauma,’ and soon enough was at the taverna with all of her Greek relatives, enjoying what was essentially her coming out party there, complete with her being allowed to taste cake for the first time. I had to give in to sweets for her after a day like that! Not that Greece was in any way a bad trip for Page. Quite the contrary, we spent several days vacationing on Crete, where Page shared a room with her Greek grandmother and great Aunt, and Page was of course incessantly smothered with lots of love and attention from all of her Greek relatives the entire two weeks we were there.
 
The Greek’s excessive use of olive oil is only surpassed by the amount of love they shower on their families.
 
Dr. Tina Lepage is the owner of Lepage Associates Solution-Based Psychological & Psychiatric Services, a group practice in S. Durham/RTP. She lives in Chapel Hill with her husband, daughter, and two dogs. www.lepageassociates.com. You can find her on Twitter at @LepageAssoc or at Facebook.com/LepageAssociates.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/dr-tina-lepage/parenting-page-olive-oil-baptism/

Is Growing Up Really All It's Cracked Up To Be?

Growing up is an interesting thing. It has its ups and downs, its interesting moments and its boring moments, its happy times and sad times, and so many other feelings. I discussed in my last column one of the sad things that is part of growing up. But there are so many other feelings than that.

One of the most common feelings that I know kids my age have is the want-nothing-to-do-with-their-parent feeling. I think this is because it makes them feel like they’re a lot older, which is a common desire in my grade. At the same time, though, there are some ways in which they don’t want that separation. For instance, I don’t know a single kid who doesn’t like to get a hug from their mom or dad, even if they protest outwardly.

I think that wanting to grow up is somewhat slowed (temporarily) by an experience like the one I had in NY for my grandmother’s funeral. As you sit there, with your mind on it, you start to feel like, in just a few days, what you thought you wanted to be – grown up. It’s hard enough on you just to sit there and support yourself, but when you’re grown up, you’re expected to do it for others, too. After that little taste of what you’ve been dreaming about, it suddenly becomes a lot less shiny.

Another part that pushes kids away: responsibility. When you were a kid, I’m pretty sure you had chores. They might have been shared with a sibling, or done by yourself (like mine). They might have been laundry, watching your little brother/sister, or sweeping. Some of mine include clearing the table, taking out the trash/recycling, and bringing in logs for our fireplace. I know a fair amount of kids, and none of them enjoys doing chores. Not one. But I don’t really think adults like their chores either.

They would rather be sleeping, playing a video game, reading, or doing any number of other things. On the other side, though, every one of them knows that, once you’re an adult, there’s a whole lot more on the chore list.

Now here’s another reason: the examples we see. Any kid could look at any adult, whether lying on a huge bed in the middle of a huge mansion, or walking up and down the street with a cardboard sign, and see a lot on that person’s mind. They can see stress, worry, and sometimes sadness. To a kid, part of being young is about having fun and not having to deal with too many of those things.

When you were a kid, did you want to be grown up? Did any of these reasons give you any doubts? Let me know in the comments below.

http://chapelboro.com/columns/a-kids-view/is-growing-up-really-all-its-cracked-up-to-be/