Resolve To Experience Orange County In 2016!

With the new year now upon us, lots of folks are making big plans for big trips and exotic experiences in 2016. But this year, you might also resolve to stay in Orange County – and take advantage of the experiences available right in your back yard.

Laurie Paolicelli of the Orange County Community Relations Department came up with a list of 10 things you can do in our community this year. How many can you check off in 2016?

Listen to Laurie’s conversation with WCHL’s Aaron Keck.

 

1. Take in a show at Memorial Hall. Carolina Performing Arts has a full calendar of shows, including Lil Buck @ Chapel Hill, A Jookin’ Jam Session in mid-April. Visit CarolinaPerformingArts.org for a list of shows, showtimes and tickets.

2. Work out at Meadowmont. YMCA of the Triangle has a Meadowmont location and there’s a UNC Wellness Center there as well. (Try a day pass for starters.)

3. Spend a day at resale stores. The PTA Thrift Shop for starters, but also check out Club Nova, Goodwill, and the Habitat ReStore. Good inventory and good products.

4. Spend time on campus! Grab drinks at Carolina Inn and then walk campus and see the Old Well. Goodnight Carolina is a free guide and app that I use to show family highlights.

5. Check out Riverwalk in Hillsborough. Afterwards, head to Hillsborough Wine company, sit and window watch and have a glass of wine. Or enjoy hot tea at Weaver Street Market. (Inside tip: Bandido’s has the best guacamole around.)

6. Honeysuckle Tea House is a must-do for 2016, especially if you’ve never been. One of Orange County’s greatest hidden treasures.

7. Ice cream at Maple View. ‘Nuff said.

8. Take a class. We all get busy, but learning something new expands the brain and is a depression buster. The ArtsCenter in Carrboro offers courses in ceramics, dance, healing arts, jewelry making, photography, theater, improv, writing, and youth arts. Or take in a lecture at the Friday Center or on campus. (The GAA’s popular Civil War series is a good bet.)

9. Spend the evening at Timberlyne! Enjoy dinner at vegetarian restaurant SAGE and take in a movie at the Chelsea.

10. Take in a show! Head downtown and check out the DSI Comedy Theater on West Franklin Street, one of the best improv theaters in the entire country…or if it’s a movie you’re after, head to Silverspot in University Place.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-town/resolve-to-experience-orange-county-in-2016

UNC Core Helps Military Personnel Earn Degrees

With the help of the state, UNC is expanding their certificate program for military personnel.

The UNC Core program offers online courses, which can be taken at the convenience of the service member and are meant to prepare them for entry into a UNC system school.

“The requirement is 27 hours of credit over the course of two or three years,” said Rob Bruce, director of the Friday Center. “You might have literature courses or physics or math or chemistry and you build the certificate by completing these courses.”

The Core program is not a degree program, but once the courses are completed, participants will earn a certificate. All of the credits earned will transfer to UNC system schools.

“It really gives military students a strong foundation in general education courses,” he said. “It really sets them up for the ultimate goal, which is for them to be admitted into a degree program and for them to complete their degree.”

The program has been in existence for a few years, but it has remained small. Bruce said this is because many don’t realize the program exists, but he expects it to grow as more people learn about it.

Last year the program had 10 enrollments. That number jumped to 50 this year.

“I will say percentage wise it’s a big jump,” he said. “But it’s still not good enough, no doubt about it. We’re expecting, once UNC Core gets up and running, we will have hundreds of enrollments in these programs.”

Bruce said the Friday Center will work to give students the resources they need, including an academic adviser with military education training.

“The next steps for the program is lots of course development,” he said. “We’re hiring additional instructional designers to help develop courses we see a need for.”

http://chapelboro.com/featured/unc-core-helps-military-personnel-earn-degrees

Lineberger Center Addresses “Cancer And Older Adults”

Cancer rates tend to increase as people get older, and cancer poses special challenges for older patients as well as caregivers. In addition, while doctors once fought cancer much the same way in every patient, researchers now are discovering that every individual requires a unique treatment strategy.

With those concerns and more in mind, the UNC Lineberger Center is inviting residents, older adults, cancer patients, caregivers – and anyone else with interest – to a symposium on “Cancer and Older Adults” Thursday, November 19, from noon to 5 pm at the Friday Center.

It’s a free public forum, featuring some of the Lineberger Center’s leading doctors and researchers, with talks and workshops highlighting the latest research and offering tools and tips for caregivers and patients fighting cancer. UNC women’s basketball head coach Sylvia Hatchell – herself a cancer survivor – is scheduled to be among the speakers.

Dr. Trevor Jolly is a geriatric oncologist at the Lineberger Center and one of the forum’s featured speakers. He stopped by WCHL this week and discussed the event with Aaron Keck.

 

For more information on the forum, including a full agenda and a link to register, visit this link. 

http://chapelboro.com/news/unc/lineberger-center-addresses-cancer-and-older-adults

Outlook Good: Expert Says U.S. Economy Doing Well Despite Uncertainties

Interest rates are likely to go up, oil prices are likely to increase a bit and then stabilize, and the overall U.S. economy is fairly strong – provided the federal government stops being dysfunctional.

That was the word from Gregory Miller, the chief economist at SunTrust Bank, at the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce’s annual Economic Outlook Briefing Thursday morning.

The big concern right now: will the Fed raise interest rates? This month officials dropped the word “patience” in their report, which signals a possible increase around June. Some economists worry that could slow economic growth, but Miller says it’s important to remember that interest rates are historically low right now.

“Rising rates are not the same as high rates,” he says. “We have a long, long way to go to get to high interest rates.”

And he says a hike in interest rates could actually boost the economy in the short term – since it’ll lead investors to borrow money quickly, to avoid higher rates in the future.

Generally speaking, Miller says the overall U.S. economy is doing well – especially relative to the rest of the world. That means a strong dollar, which means lower prices for Americans at the stores.

Miller says the American economy is growing at a rate of about 2.4 percent. Economists say a 3-percent growth rate is needed to keep up with increasing job demands – but Miller says the private sector is actually already doing that well. What’s holding the economy back? He says the federal government is simply failing to pull its weight.

“The government’s started to come back,” he says. “State and local governments are already back – the federal government is the only one that’s (still) moving in the wrong direction.

“We suspect that through this year, the (federal) government should start to make a positive contribution to growth. If they do that, then the whole economy (will be) doing 3 percent – and everybody’s happy.”

Miller delivered his economic outlook briefing to a group of about 200 local business leaders and elected officials Thursday at the Friday Center. It was an optimistic outlook, in general – but he did say the positive trends could be jeopardized by increasing instability.

That could come globally if there is conflict or if other national economies collapse – or it could come domestically, when election season rolls around next year.

“When we are headed toward elections, the markets and the economy tend to turn uncertain,” Miller says.

So expect a possible slowdown next year – but until then, Miller says the overall picture is good.

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/outlook-good-expert-says-u-s-economy-doing-well-despite-uncertainties

Chilton, OCRCC Among Honorees At Chamber Mtg

CHAPEL HILL – About 400 political and business leaders gathered at the Friday Center on Thursday for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting, to honor outstanding local businesses, nonprofits, and individuals.

Meg McGurk of the Chapel Hill Downtown Partnership set the tone in her keynote address. “Downtown has reached a tipping point,” she told the attendees. “The private sector is investing in downtown on unprecedented levels, the public sector has taken a new pride in engaging in our downtown…(and) you are the ones that are making that change happen.”

The highlight of the annual meeting was the awarding of the Chamber’s annual Business of the Year honors:

• The Micro-Enterprise Business of the Year award went to Sweeps, a company that matches UNC students with locals in need of moving, cleaning, tutoring, and other odd jobs.

Vimala’s Curryblossom Café beat out 140 West Franklin and the newly expanded PTA Thrift Shop for the Mid-Size Business of the Year award.

• The Large Business of the Year honor went to ARCA, an international manufacturer and distributer with global headquarters in Mebane.

• The Orange County Rape Crisis Center won the Chamber’s Nonprofit of the Year award.

And the Chamber also recognized three individuals as well. Longtime volunteer Irene Briggaman won the Ambassador of the Year award; UNC Executive Director of Real Estate Gordon Merklein won the Duke Energy Citizenship and Service award for his work not only with UNC, but also with various local service organizations. And outgoing Chamber board chair Paige Zinn recognized former Carrboro Mayor Mark Chilton with the Chamber’s award for Leadership in Public-Private Partnership.

“Mark has demonstrated that you can support economic and community development without forswearing your interest in the environment and social justice,” Zinn said of Chilton.

Attendees at the meeting included state government officials, the three mayors of Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough, and all but one member of the Orange County Board of Commissioners.

http://chapelboro.com/news/business/local-leaders-businesses-honor-local-leaders-businesses

A Golden Celebration, 50 years of the IFC

The Inter-Faith Counsel celebrated 50 years of service at the Friday Center Thursday, June 6 with smooth jazz, delicious food and drinks – catered by Carolina Catering and Top Of The Hill, respectively. Ron Stutts emceed the event and speakers included Reverend Robert Seymour and J. Freeman. The elegance of the event was impeccable and second to none, except to the illuminated hearts of those involved, apart, or a product of, the Inter-Faith Counsel.

http://chapelboro.com/photos/a-golden-celebration-50-years-of-the-ifc