FINAL: UNC 28 – UVA 27 — Click for Recap

Orange, Carrboro Leaders Discuss Process of Changes in Rural Buffer

Possible changes in the Rural Buffer sparked some lively conversation between Orange County Commissioners and Carrboro Alderpersons on Thursday night.

“Originally, any development in the rural buffer had to be approved by all three governments,” recalled Orange County Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs. “And that was not going to work. Just imagine. So, I don’t think he want to re-live those kinds of discussions.”

Jacobs recalled how the brand-new Joint Planning Agreement between Orange County, Carrboro and Chapel Hill almost fell apart back in 1987.

Orange County recently proposed amendments to the agreement that would allow “appropriate agricultural support uses” in the Rural Buffer, a low-density residential area comprised of 38,000 acres. It includes the New Hope Creek Basin, the University Lake Watershed, and the Southern Triangle area.

The goal is to generate more farm-related income.

One example cited during Thursday’s meeting at the Southern Human Services Center was the success of Maple View Ice Cream County Store in Hillsborough. Commissioner Earl McKee pointed out that the opening of the store in 2001 has become a boon to neighboring dairy farm business.

But some Carrboro Alderpersons are concerned that too many changes too soon could open the door to more intense development in the area.

“Are we really opening up a can of worms – making more uses that will be competing with farms?” asked Alderperson Sammy Slade.

McKee and fellow Commissioner Bernadette Pelessier said they were unclear about what harm would come to the farming community from the existence of more supporting commercial enterprises.

“I’m just struggling with people’s definitions of ‘commercial,’ for example,” said Pelessier, “because I see farms as commercial. It’s a business. And a lot of the things here are to help support farmers and agri-tours, which, I think, a lot of people in this community have said they do want to have.”

Jacobs suggested that all three staffs and attorneys from each governing body meet to hash things out, rather than the three jurisdictions trying to move separately on the issues.

He offered that perhaps that could be accomplished in time for the Assembly of Governments meeting on Nov. 19.

The Chapel Hill Town Council has yet to discuss proposed changes. That will likely happen at its Nov 10 meeting.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/orange-carrboro-leaders-discuss-process-changes-rural-buffer/

Kinnaird: Carrboro Could Be More ‘Business-Friendly’

Retired state Senator and former Carrboro Mayor Ellie Kinnaird said she’d like to see a more business-friendly Carrboro – as well as a post office that recognizes the town’s actual boundaries.

“I would like you to ask the post office to draw the boundaries of Carrboro where they actually are,” Kinnaird told the Board of Aldermen last Tuesday night, to applause.

Kinnaird said it’s something she’s been working on since she was mayor. She held the office from 1987 to 1996, when she was elected to the N.C. Senate.

Kinnaird retired in 2013. She still owns property, including two cemetery plots, in Carrboro.

One reason for her brief appearance in front of the Board of Aldermen last Tuesday was to request that the town manager’s office look into making the Old Carrboro Cemetery a green burial site. The board unaninimously approved that request.

And she had other issues in mind. Some Carrboro residents still have a Chapel Hill address, and the last time the Town of Carrboro inquired about changing that, the postal service conducted a survey of those residents’ preferences.

Carrboro lost that round. Kinnaird said said she realizes that it’s a lot of trouble to change addresses.

“Some people like the cachet, they think, of Chapel Hill,” said Kinnaird. “So what I would ask is that if you do ask the post office to do that, that you ask them not to take a survey, but to just make what is actually on the ground the actual change.”

Kinnaird brought up another sleeping issue from the past: a street that was once planned to connect Lloyd Street to Greensboro Street.

“Lloyd Street is a dead end,” said Kinnaird. “There are quite a few businesses there right now, and the Piedmont Health center.”

Speaking of business, she praised ongoing development at 300 East Main Street, including the new hotel, and called the new parking deck a “lifesaver.”

But she also lamented the recent loss of some businesses around town – Phydeaux and DSI to Chapel Hill; and Miel Bon Bons Fine Chocolate & Artisan Bake Shop and Caktus Consulting Group to Durham.

She said that Carrboro needs to set aside more open office space, and that the town could probably take some tips – but not too many – from Wake County.

Kinnaird said she’s read positive comments recently from businesspeople about Garner, in particular.

“Garner is agile and easy to work with,” said Kinnaird. “These are the businesspeople talking about that. We know that Carrboro and Chapel Hill are not agile and easy to work with.”

She said she hoped that Carrboro could take a more business-friendly attitude, and mentioned Durham’s Innovation District as an example.

Mayor Lydia Lavelle thanked Kinnaird for her comments, and said she would look into the post office matter.

Members of the board said they’d also look into improving the traffic light situation at 300 East Main, as Kinnaird requested.

Alderperson Jacquie Gist mentioned to Kinnaird that there are some business-friendly Carrboro events coming up over the next few weeks, perhaps a reference to the Think Local business campaign that kicks off Oct 2, with a Happy Hour at Venable’s new B-Side Lounge at Carr Mill Mall.

And she offered a not-so-subtle hint to Kinnaird that there are still a lot of vacancies that need to be filled on Carrboro’s advisory boards.

http://chapelboro.com/news/news-around-time/kinnaird-carrboro-business-friendly/

Carrboro Aldermen Give Go-Ahead for Traffic Calming on Tallyho Trail

If you live in a neighborhood where cars zoom through way too fast, but you’re not thrilled with the idea of speed bumps and speed tables, then you can probably sympathize with the residents of Carrboro’s Fox Meadow subdivision.

“This is not just a Fox Meadow neighborhood issue,” said resident Laura Wenzel to the Carrboro Board of Aldermen Tuesday night, “because there are a lot of people from the Rogers Road neighborhoods, like the Habitat houses, and Sylvan Way houses who walk on the road.”

Back in 2012, neighbors submitted a traffic calming request for Tallyho Trail, a narrow road about a mile long. It has only one way in-and-out off Rogers Road.

“This was a street that was constructed when this was still part of Orange County’s jurisdiction that we then annexed,” said Planning Administrator Tina Moon, “and then the town took over the street. I think the pavement’s only about 20 feet wide.”

A year later, Fox Meadow neighborhood representatives submitted a related petition signed by nearly 160 people.

They said they were concerned about unsafe conditions for pedestrians, as well as a lack of walking paths in a area where vehicles often zip through at unsafe speeds, despite the posted 25 MPH limit.

Town staff conducted traffic studies at four points along Tallyho Trail, and on Tuesday night, the Board of Aldermen heard some recommendations from the Transportation Advisory Board.

Based on the framework established by the town’s Residential Traffic Management Plan, there are two stages for dealing with dangerous speeding.

Stage One measures include educational and outreach efforts, such as going door-to-door, and holding neighborhood meetings.

In this case, said Moon, residents also need to be educated about which side of the street is safest for walking, and for kids to ride bikes.

In Stage Two, physical controls such as speed bumps and speed tables are introduced. In her remarks, Wenzel mentioned that many residents aren’t fans of that option.

Moon told the Board that the town has already taken some small measures. Public Works put up a couple more speed limit signs, and a radar sign was tested over two days this summer.

The planning administrator said this is a case where Stage One should be implemented, but the town needs to study the problem further.

“It’s a long road,” said Moon. “Putting in speed bumps might pose some challenges, either because they would be too far-spaced, or there would be so many, with over a mile, that it might not be the best way to go.”

The Board voted unanimously to give town staff permission to move forward on Stage One, with the stipulation that some version of Stage Two would be implemented immediately, if the first stage is deemed insufficient.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-aldermen-give-go-ahead-traffic-calming-tallyho-trail/

Carrboro Town Historian Considered by Board of Aldermen

Carrboro Aldermen will consider creating the position of Town Historian when the Board meets Tuesday night.

If the Board approves the position, the town would put out a call for applicants, and alderpersons would appoint a historian to serve for a four-year term.

The Board will also consider signing an interlocal agreement with Chapel Hill and Orange County to reimburse the county for preliminary engineering and community outreach efforts related to the effort bring sewer service to the Rogers Road neighborhood.

Carrboro’s share totals $25,200.

The Board of Aldermen meets at 7:30 at Carrboro Town Hall.

You can view the agenda here.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-town-historian-considered-board-aldermen/

Carrboro Considering More Chicken-Friendly Ordinance

If you live in Carrboro, and you’d like to keep your own chickens for non-commercial purposes, you can rest assured that the Board of Aldermen is considering ways to make that easier for you.

“I mean, a lot of people do not live on 10,000-square-foot lots in this town,” said Carrboro Alderperson Damon Seils at Tuesday night’s Board of Aldermen work session, “but can very humanely and safely keep chickens.”

For several years, 10.000 square feet has been the required lot size for keeping chickens within Carrboro town limits.

Recently, the Animal Control Board of Appeals considered two requests for keeping chickens on residential property.

The applicants learned that their lots are not big enough. So the Board of Appeals brought the matter to Town Hall Tuesday night.

One thing the Alderpersons and Mayor Lydia Lavelle seemed to agree on early in the discussion is that the 10,000-square-foot lot requirement seemed arbitrary, and Town Attorney Michael Brough later confirmed that.

So the question was: How to re-regulate the housing of chickens on residential lots.

“One of the concepts that’s used in other local governments is that there is actually some square-footage requirement per chicken, and that’s one of the things that the Animal Control Board of Appeals discussed,” said Carrboro Planning Director Trish McGuire.

Alderperson Sammy Slade said he’d done some research into the humane care and keeping of chickens, and found that 10 square feet per chicken for the run, and four square feet of space per chicken in the coop are considered reasonable.

Alderperson Michelle Johnson said that during a recent meeting on the subject, Police Chief Walter Horton had recommended a cap on the number of chickens allowed on a lot.

“I know Chapel Hill’s maximum is 10,” said Johnson, “but they don’t have a square footage requirement.”

Alderperson Jacquie Gist warned against possible unintended consequences for setting caps. She spoke up for a large local property that is home to many chickens. The owners, she said, even rescue fowl.

So Slade offered that a revised ordinance should simply ensure that each space is appropriate for the number of fowl a property owner wishes to keep.

Seils said he favors regulated setbacks over lot-size requirements. He added that he also liked the idea of only requiring permits for people who want to keep more than three-or-four chickens.

“I’m kind of for not having a lot of rules here,” he said.

While other alderpersons concurred, there were also concerns expressed about neighborhood chicken farming, Chickens could attract unwanted attention from predators – domestic outdoor cats, and, even worse, rabid foxes, or coyotes.

Alderperson Bethany Chaney said that it would probably be wise for the town to keep track of how many chickens were living in Carrboro. And she cracked herself up by the way she phrased that:

“I think we want to be able to gauge, you know – is there some kind of critical mass of chickens in town?”

Despite those concerns, the Board voted unanimously to direct town staff to draft a new version of the ordinance that would strike the requirement on lot size. Instead, they want to come up with a square-footage-per-chicken requirement. The Board will also seek advice from the Planning Department on setbacks.

An old requirement that eggs laid by chickens on a lot within town limits could only be consumed by people living on that lot will also be tweaked, to allow chicken owners to give away eggs for free, if they wish.

http://chapelboro.com/news/national/town-carrboro-considering-chicken-friendly-ordinance/

Carrboro Plans ‘Think Local’ Economic Campaign

Carrboro residents and visitors can expect to see a major campaign in the near future to “Think Local First” when it comes to doing business in the town.

“A lot of consumers don’t understand the magnitude of impact shopping locally has,” said Clay Schossow, a partner and media manager of New Media Campaigns, a web design, development and marketing agency in Carrboro.

On Tuesday night, Schossow gave a presentation about the work of the Think Local First Committee to an enthusiastic Carrboro Board of Aldermen, at its first meeting after a summer break.

Just before the Board adjourned for the summer, it appointed the committee, which met two hours every week from mid-July through late August.

Overseen by the Town of Carrboro’s Economic and Community Development Director Annette Stone, the committee started with eight local businesspeople, and grew to about 15.

The goal of the brainstorming sessions was to find ways promote a stronger local economy; to raise consumer awareness about the importance of that; and to get local businesses talking to each other too,

The committee looked BALLE for some guidance. BALLE, which stands for Business Alliance for Living Local Economies, is a nationwide network of more than 50,000 local community entrepreneurs. The organization promotes localism.

At Tuesday night’s Town Hall meeting, Schossow noted that the snazzier new Town of Carrboro website is up-and-running, and that said he sees another opportunity there.

“The new logo, the slogan – everything really dovetailed really nicely to launch a local business campaign,” said Schossow.

He said the first goal is to get local businesses to support the campaign, and to to turn to each other to fulfill needs that could include promotional T-shirts, work in the trades, and catering.

Schossow told the Board of Aldermen that about 50 businesses have been contacted about the local business initiative, and he said that most are “extremely interested.”

Another goal, said Schossow, is to Increase consumer awareness about what local Carrboro has to offer that could save a consumer a trip all the way to Southpoint.

Schossow added that the Think Local campaign will reach beyond downtown.

“We wanted to make sure that we reached out to the periphery,” said Schossow, “and we had all of Carrboro thinking locally, and the same with businesses. We’re not jus talking about downtown businesses. We’re talking about everyone in Carrboro proper.”

He also talked about attracting tourists, as well as “daytrippers” from neighboring towns and cities who come to Carrboro for specific reasons – a show at the Cat’s Cradle, for instance, or a visit to the Farmers’ Market. He’d like to see more of them stick around for brunch, or some retail shopping.

The Think Local group plans to organize a series of events that gets local businesses working together, and doing business with each other.

The kickoff event for that effort will be a “Happy Hour” at Venable’s new B-Side Lounge at Carr Mill Mall on Oct. 2.

Schossow said that Annette Stone spent the summer building a list of about 400 viable local businesses in Carrboro.

Out of that, he said he hopes that 60-to-100 business people will show up to the first local event and just start talking to each other.

Other ideas that came out of the summer meeting include an email newsletter that keeps residents and visitors informed of upcoming events.

And Carrboro commuters may soon be seeing an ad on their bus route with the slogan: “Carrboro: Local Matters.”

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-plans-think-local-economic-campaign/

Locals Reach Out To Aid Immigrant Children

With more than 1,000 unaccompanied children crossing the southern border into the United States each week, local residents are looking for a way to respond to what some are calling a “humanitarian crisis.”

Jacqueline Gist, longtime member of the Carrboro Board of Aldermen, says she wants to reach out to help undocumented immigrant children being detained in shelters while awaiting deportation proceedings.

“Children who are far from home, coming out of very scary, dangerous, life-threatening situations- if we can’t find fit in our hearts to help those children, then I hate to think of who we’ve become,” says Gist.

More than 57,000 unaccompanied minors have sought to cross the U.S. – Mexico border in the past eight months, fleeing violence in Central America.

The Department of Health and Human Services operates approximately 100 shelters near the border that can house the children until they can be settled with families to await their hearings. Due to the recent influx, three more shelters have opened in California, Texas and Oklahoma.

As the children have been moved from one location to another, images of angry locals yelling at school buses have flooded the media in past weeks, prompting some, like Gist, to offer a rebuttal in the form of an invitation.

“My original thought had been that our community could welcome a busload of these children who are being treated with hatred in other places where they show up, and help them through their resettlement process that they’re going through,” says Gist.

But while Gist says the response from the local community has been in favor of offering temporary shelter, federal guidelines stand in the way.

“[The Department of Health and Human Services] is not interested in a one-time thing, they’re more looking for what they call permanent facilities, that would be at least thirty-six months and that would pretty much be open to a steady stream of children,” says Gist.

To be considered as a shelter, a facility must be licensed by the state and run by a group home care provider. The deadline to apply is early August.

“I don’t think we’re in a position to provide a facility for these children. I think it’s too big and the time frame is too short. The actions necessary to get there would take months and months and months.”

Still, she says concerned citizens in Chapel Hill and Carrboro can find a way to help.

“That doesn’t mean there isn’t anything that we can do, and I think what we need to do I find organizations in our region who are already helping or who are poised to help and see how we can support those.”

Gist says the Church of Reconciliation is already accepting donations of toys and Spanish-language books to offer children in shelters, and she expects similar efforts to gain momentum in the coming weeks.

http://chapelboro.com/news/national/locals-reach-aid-immigrant-children/

Carrboro Aldermen Compromise on Drive-Thru Ban

A proposal to broaden Carrboro’s 1998 ban on drive-throughs at downtown businesses to include other areas of town brought several citizens out to Tuesday night’s Board of Aldermen meeting.

Most of the citizens that spoke at the meeting were against the idea, and in the end, the Board came up with a compromise.

“Drive-thrus located in appropriate areas, and under specified guidelines, like those enacted in 1998, are amenities. By denying them, you jeopardize the commercial growth that might have followed. Lack of commercial growth threatens the broadening of our commercial tax base, thereby continuing to overburden the residential property owners.”

That’s Linda Lloyd, speaking at the summer’s final meeting of the Carrboro Board of Aldermen. Her husband, Gene Lloyd, is a member of the family that owned and operated Lloyd Electric Company on Main Street for more than 50 years.

The family also owns 40 acres across from Carrboro Plaza on NC 54. The property is currently under contract under the name Lloyd Farm Development.

Lloyd was one of several citizens, including Kristen Smith from the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, who came out to speak against a proposed ban on drive-thru features at all Carrboro developments, with the exception of pharmacies.

New drive-thrus were prohibited in the center of the downtown business area back in 1998 as part of Carrboro’s Land Use Ordinance. The Wendy’s drive-thru at the corner of Main and Greensboro Streets pre-dated that rule by about 15 years.

But the new resolution would ban drive-thrus from developments in other areas, such as Highway 54.
Lloyd’s arguments against prohibiting drive-thrus were similar to others that were presented during the public comments portion of the hearing. People said it would scare off businesses; that it discriminates against the elderly, the disabled, and parents with small and/or sick children.

They said it creates an inconvenience for commuters, and would cause consumers to spend money elsewhere.

But a couple of speakers expressed their support for the ban. Retired UNC academic adviser Barb Stenross lives on Carol Street, near the Lloyd Farm property.

“It’s right where I walk around,” said Stenross. “I’m a senior. I walk. I don’t feel comfortable on a bike. I wish I still did. But it’s very important for me to have a community that has trees, that has a good environment, that does not have traffic emissions.

“I’m fine with having a pharmacy drive-in, because I think that does serve families and the disabled. But I think this is a good ordinance.”

Carrboro Planning Board member Catherine Adamson reiterated that board’s recommendation – which was not unanimous, she added – to prohibit all drive-thrus, including pharmacies.

When it was time for alderpersons to speak, Damon Seils said that he’s received a lot of phone calls, emails, and personal visits about the issue recently, and it’s caused him to re-think the proposal.

“I have no doubt that there are negative environmental impacts of drive-thrus, and public health impacts of drive-thrus,” said Seils. “And that’s important to me. But as we know, there are also concerns about accessibility. And we’ve heard from several people both tonight, and in emails and elsewhere, about the importance of accessibility for people with limited mobility, and for their caregivers, which, I think, is another important point we’ve heard about recently.”

Seils made a motion to extend the ban to districts zoned for limited industrial use, as well as commercial uses that include wholesaling, storage, mail-order, auto-related businesses, offices and retail.

Areas include that part of Greensboro Street where Fitch Lumber is located; and the area along Jones Ferry Road near the Orange Water and Sewer Authority.

He added that drive-thrus in other areas should be a subject of future discussion.

Alderperson Michelle Johnson said that while she agreed with Seils’ motion more than the resolution before the board, she thought that everyone should be mindful that the environmental concerns of people like Barb Stenross, who live outside the downtown area, should not be dismissed.

“I can support what you’re saying, more than I could support a ban on all drive-thrus,” said Johnson, “because of the accessibility issues. And we’re all aging, too, so there’s going to be a point when we’re all rolling up to a drive-through, too, right?”

The Board of Aldermen passed Seils’ motion unanimously.

Alderpersons Randee Haven-O’Donnell and Jacquelyn Gist said they’d work together over the summer to plan some public forums in the fall regarding drive-thrus,to see what creative ideas may come out of that.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-aldlermen-compromise-drive-thru-ban/

Carrboro Board of Aldermen to Vote on Drive-Thrus

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen will vote tonight on whether to ban drive-through windows at all Carrboro businesses, with the exception of pharmacies.

Drive-throughs are banned downtown already, but a resolution being considered tonight would ban them in other areas such as Highway 54.

This has been a subject of lively discussion recently, both among the alderpersons and members of the public weighing in on social media.

Opponents of the ban say that it would hurt parents of young children, people with disabilities, and businesses.

Public comments will be received before a vote is taken.

The meeting takes place at 7:30 at Carrboro Town Hall, located at 301 West Main Street in Carrboro.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-board-aldermen-vote-drive-thrus/

Carrboro Board of Aldermen to Vote on $21.3 Million Budget

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen has a busy agenda at its Town Hall meeting Tuesday – and one of items is a resolution to adopt the $21.3 million budget for fiscal year 2014-15.

As part of that package, there will be a vote to approve bonuses of either $500, $1,000 or $1,500 for town employees, based on annual performance reviews.

The resolution states that “the Board of Aldermen desires to provide all Town employees an annual salary at or above the local Minimum Housing Wage.”

The Board will also vote on whether to approve a two-percent cost-of-living salary increase for all full-time and part-time town employees, as well as appointed employees and elected officials.

The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall, located at 301 West Main Street in Carrboro.

http://chapelboro.com/news/local-government/carrboro-board-aldermen-vote-21-3-million-budget/