Lifestyle http://chapelboro.com/rss/lifestyle Lifestyle RSS Feed Fri, 19 Dec 2014 20:09:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 More of what you live here for Lifestyle no More of what you live here for Lifestyle http://chapelboro.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://chapelboro.com/rss/lifestyle Short List Voting: Best Place To Buy Unique Gifts http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-voting-best-place-buy-unique-gifts/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-voting-best-place-buy-unique-gifts/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:00:39 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=123012 Plenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose? Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in YOUR […]

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short list winners

Plenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose?

Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in YOUR community. We’ve been collecting your submissions for the month of December for “Best Place To Buy Unique Gifts,” and now it’s time to vote on the top spots! We’ll announce the winner on Tuesday, December 29th! The voting period goes from December 16th to the 28th.

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Short List Submissions: Best Place To Buy Unique Gifts http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-submissions-best-place-buy-unique-gifts/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-submissions-best-place-buy-unique-gifts/#comments Tue, 09 Dec 2014 10:00:58 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=122451 Plenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose? Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in our […]

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short list winnersPlenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose? Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in our community. This month, the category is the “Best Place To Buy Unique Gifts.” In the form below, submit all the locations that YOU think deserve to be on the Short List – the local shops where you find one-of-a-kind gifts. Submissions will last until Tuesday, December 16th – we’ll compile your entries and let the community vote on the best! Check back December 16th to vote!

The call for submissions has ended this month!

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Ten Best Of November http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/ten-best-november/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/ten-best-november/#comments Thu, 04 Dec 2014 16:09:38 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=121977 Today we’re featuring the best articles published on Chapelboro.com over the past month. From sports and science to health and history, we bring you local writers on issues that matter to you. Read your favorites again, or catch up on articles you missed! Egg On UNC’s Face, by Art Chansky Real Food Meets Real Life, […]

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Today we’re featuring the best articles published on Chapelboro.com over the past month. From sports and science to health and history, we bring you local writers on issues that matter to you. Read your favorites again, or catch up on articles you missed!

Egg On UNC’s Face, by Art Chansky

Real Food Meets Real Life, by Elizabeth Terry Joyner

The “Lux Et Libertas” Head Fake, by Lew Margolis

Is The Toilet The Greatest Public Health Invention Ever?, by Jeff Danner

Mary Willingham Deserves An Apology, by Ellie Kinnaird

Chapel Hill Won’t Attract Tomorrow’s Businesses With Yesterday’s Office Space, by Matt Bailey

UNC Academics Scandal Painful Hit For College Sports Loyalists, by Billy Reed

Fashion Trends For Fall/Winter 2014, by Kristin Tucker

A Day In The Life At The Battle 4 Atlantis, by Aaron Keck

Take A Walk, by Jared Rogers

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Achilles’ Heel, Jared’s Neuroma http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/achilles-heel-jareds-neuroma/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/achilles-heel-jareds-neuroma/#comments Wed, 03 Dec 2014 14:44:09 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=121651 “Achilles heel”: an expression meaning “a weak or vulnerable spot.” Physically speaking, almost everyone has one. Most people are consciously aware of their own weak link and seek out advice on how to manage it. While any area of the body is susceptible, my “Achilles heel” has always been my feet. As I picked up […]

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“Achilles heel”: an expression meaning “a weak or vulnerable spot.” Physically speaking, almost everyone has one. Most people are consciously aware of their own weak link and seek out advice on how to manage it. While any area of the body is susceptible, my “Achilles heel” has always been my feet. As I picked up running in high school, I developed burning and stinging pains that radiated from my metatarsals into my toes on my right foot. The local podiatrist diagnosed Morton’s Neuroma, a fairly common condition in which the nerve that runs between the third and fourth metatarsals becomes pinched and inflamed. Little did I know of the treacherous journey that was about to unfold.

The doctor recommended I stop running and put an over-the-counter orthotic into my shoe. That helped, so then he molded custom orthotics to my feet. They were clunky and stiff, but they seemed to reduce the pain. After a few months, though, the discomfort returned whilst running and playing in my orthotics. Another visit to the podiatrist ended with a cortisone injection in between my third and fourth metatarsals. That injection did nothing, and a series of following injections made the condition worse. By this point, I was rarely going barefoot, and spent most of my time in my stiff orthotics. This sufficed as long as the activity wasn’t too vigorous, which meant little running, jumping, or high-impact activity.

I was frustrated that I could not play the sports I used to love growing up, so I asked what the next step in the treatment plan was. My podiatrist gave me two options. The first was to live with the pain. The second was a simple surgery (in the words of my podiatrist). He would make a small incision on the top of my foot, then cut and remove the pinched nerve from in between my metatarsals. It would leave a small area of my skin without feeling, but I would be pain free. The surgery would entail spending three weeks off my feet, and three weeks easing back into normal activity.

At the promise that I could be pain free and fully functional in six weeks, I picked the second option. I underwent surgery in May of 2011 and began a painful recovery. The burning, stinging, shooting pain I had experienced was now exponentially worse. Instead of radiating down into my toes, it was radiating up my leg. I could feel the exact spot where the nerve was severed; it felt like a large knot inside my foot. The shooting pain would go into the arch of my foot, through the heel and ankle, up behind my knee, and sometimes even radiate into my hamstrings and glutes on the right leg. Any movement that stretched the posterior tissue set off that reaction. Medical professionals were perplexed by this, as sensations normally radiate distally, not proximally.

My podiatrist was not concerned about these pains, stating it was just my body healing post-surgery. He recommended that I start moving as much as tolerable to start getting back to my normal self. Now that I was able to bear weight on my foot, the pain intensified. He then recommended putting my orthotics back into my shoes. One of the main reasons I opted for surgery was to be free of those rigid orthotics, so it was irritating to be back into them. After the orthotics provided little relief, he was out of ideas and told me to give it time.

I gave it time, and I healed to the point where I could walk intermediate distances in the orthotics, but I was worse off than before the surgery. Any type of running and jumping was excruciating, and walking more than a mile began to wear on me. I never went barefoot, even around the house or in the shower; I always needed cushioning for the bottom of my foot.

Frustrated, I moved on to a different podiatrist. He prescribed a different brand of orthotics, which immediately made the issue worse. He also had me soak my feet in contrast baths, which was painless but not helpful. I had learned about injections which involved putting an alcohol solution into the nerve to kill the tissue, thus eliminating the pain. This podiatrist knew about the treatment and was willing to try it. Every ten days I would have a needle inserted into my severed nerve in hopes of killing the cells. It was all to no avail. Six injections provided no relief, so I was passed along to perform four weeks of physical therapy. My therapist tried a variety of modalities to decrease my pain, and she ultimately thought scar tissue was causing my problems. We agreed to have the podiatrist numb my foot with a few injections, and the therapist performed deep tissue work with a plastic tool to break up the scar tissue. The foot stayed numb until after I fell asleep that night. I woke the next morning to throbbing, radiating pain. This was the turning point where I went from being in chronic pain but functional, to being handicapped. I could hardly limp 50 yards before I had to stop, take weight off my foot, and wait for the excruciating sensations to subside before trying another terrible 50 yards.

Another trip to the podiatrist provided me with two options: I could either live with the pain or undergo another surgery (sound familiar?). I had fallen into such a depression from my physical problems and social isolation that I was having serious and frequent thoughts about suicide. Living with the pain was not going to be an option. I knew that I had to get another surgery, but I was skeptical of letting a podiatrist perform it again.

I researched and found an orthopedist that specialized in the foot and ankle. He concluded that surgery was necessary to address the problem, and he warned me to never let a podiatrist perform surgery. This was humorous because my podiatrist told me to never let an orthopedist perform foot surgery. I chose the orthopedist based on his words: “No surgery is ever simple and easy. Any time we cut into someone, it’s a big deal. Don’t let anyone tell you differently.”

I underwent another surgery in February of 2012, nine months after the first. When the orthopedist opened the bottom of my foot, he found the cut nerve directly under my fourth metatarsal. The nerve should have been tucked into soft tissue in the arch of my foot, not left to sit under one of my metatarsal heads. The second surgery entailed three weeks off my feet using crutches, and another five weeks getting back into activity. I had low-level laser therapy performed on the surgical site to assist the healing process. This recovery was immediately different and more pleasant than the first. The shooting pain up my leg was gone, and I was able to bear my own weight after several weeks.

Unfortunately, the story is not over. For the previous nine months I had heavily favored my left foot, which was now beginning to hurt exactly like my right one had – in between the third and fourth metatarsals. As I was able to do more on my feet, it was the left foot which began to be the weak link. This was devastating, and I continued in my depression. I had been through hell, and I was still stuck after years of pain. In my right foot I have had over 20 injections and two surgeries under anesthesia; I did not want to go down that same road with my left.

This got me doing vigorous research on foot health and what could be done, conservatively speaking, to manage the pain. I could not take back any of the decisions I had made regarding surgery, but I knew there had to be a better way to treat my feet. I observed that on both of my feet, my fourth metatarsal bones sat lower than the other bones, leading to increased pressure on that joint. I inferred that the dropped metatarsals could be creating a shearing force on the nerve, causing the burning and tingling sensations. I learned that this dropped metatarsal was probably caused by wearing shoes all my life. Shoes wear out in the middle quicker than around the edges, causing my feet to bow down for years, leading to a change in anatomy. Also, almost all shoes pinch the toes together, aggravating the nerves already under tension. Finally, most shoes have a raised heel which places more pressure on the metatarsals than on the heel. I have come to believe that these three components were the true cause of my problems. Shoes, arguably designed to protect one’s feet, deformed mine and caused atrophy and dysfunction. Do not be fooled into thinking only high heels are the “bad” type of shoes, either. Most pairs of shoes in your closet could be directly correlated to any type of foot dysfunction you may experience. None of my doctors ever said a thing about the detrimental role shoes played in the development of foot problems.

Through my research and experimentation, my feet are pain free in the metatarsal area today. I avoided the same fiasco in my left foot through the following methods:

First, toe socks help create space in between the toes and help align the toes into a straighter position. My favorite brand is Injinji. Regular socks compress the feet slightly, which could aggravate pinched nerves.

Second, I wear Correct Toes. Correct Toes are silicone toe spacers that can be worn inside of shoes (proper shoes) to align the foot in its anatomically correct position – in which the foot is widest at the ends of the toes, not at the ball of the foot. Correct Toes are simply amazing. A podiatrist named Ray McClanahan invented Correct Toes. His website, www.nwfootankle.com, is the most helpful resource for foot health online.

Third, I learned from Dr. McClanahan’s website about metatarsal pads. These are small, teardrop-shaped foam pads that are placed inside shoes to keep the metatarsal heads in their proper place. They lift and separate the bones to recreate a natural arch.

Finally, the shoe itself is important. Shoes should be widest at the ends of the toes, flat from heel to toe, and flexible. Avoid shoes with narrow toe boxes, raised heels, toe spring, and those that are very stiff. Altra and Lems are my two favorite shoe companies. Altras are fully cushioned, whereas Lems are minimal.

Another principle I learned from Dr. McClanahan’s website was the idea that “you were born with perfect feet.” The traditional podiatric view says our feet are defective and need orthotic arch support to function. McClanahan, however, teaches that strengthening your bare feet through specific exercises and walking barefoot helps restore natural foot health and function. I began taking barefoot walks through the forest two to three times per week to let my feet function in their natural state and build strength, fat pads, and calluses. I have to be careful during my barefoot walks as my feet are still vulnerable, but these walks are invaluable in helping with my foot health.

I was misinformed by my podiatrists. I was told on two occasions that I only had two miserable options – live with pain or undergo invasive surgery. This was wrong, and I learned the valuable lessons that even doctors are human and that there are still many mysteries within modern medicine.

Learning and implementing Dr. McClanahan’s methods for healthy feet have helped me regain my function and health. I go barefoot around my house without fear of pain. I take long walks in my Altras on a regular basis – some days I only go out for an hour, but on weekends I sometimes take day hikes in excess of 10 miles. I can run and jump if I need to, though I have not taken up distance running again.

Morton’s Neuroma & Metatarsalgia conservative treatment plan review:

  1. Wear toe socks
  2. Wear Correct Toes
  3. Wear shoes that are:
    1. Widest at the toes
    2. Flat from heel to toe
    3. Flexible
  4. Place metatarsal pads inside proper shoes
  5. Walk barefoot as much as tolerable, and perform foot strengthening exercises regularly

 

I share this information so that you can be empowered to seek out the conservative methods that will help correct your metatarsal pain. If you are someone with a different Achilles heel, use the ideas from this essay to explore the options for your particular condition. Do not believe someone when they say that you have to live with your pain. Sometimes surgery may be necessary, but seek out varied opinions and do your own research. I blindly followed the advice of my doctors because I believed they knew what was best for me. No one knows what is best for you except you, so take control of your own healthcare decisions and be well-informed on your personal abilities and limitations.

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November Short List Winner – Best Place For Pets http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/november-short-list-winner-best-place-pets/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/november-short-list-winner-best-place-pets/#comments Tue, 02 Dec 2014 14:32:27 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=121520 The votes are in, and it’s official: the winner of November's Chapelboro Short List for “Best Place For Pets” is...

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short list winners

The votes are in, and it’s official: the winner of November’s Chapelboro Short List for “Best Place For Pets” is Green Beagle Lodge!

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Green Beagle Lodge is Chapel Hill’s newest pet boarding facility, but it’s already become its most popular! And no wonder – it’s nicer than most hotels for humans. With comfortable accommodations and fun recreational activities, what pet wouldn’t want to stay there? They also feature grooming and training services, as well as environmentally-friendly building technology that puts the “green” in Green Beagle!

Also on the Short List

Chapel Hill Pet Resort

5a22aaad-1590-4853-82de-8004562dfa4bWith an emphasis on keeping your pet active and engaged, Chapel Hill Pet Resort has dedicated staff and an outdoor play area full of enriching toys. They even group dogs by age, size and temperament so that everyone can enjoy themselves equally.

Doggie Spa & Day Care

desk_thDoggie Spa & Day Care is a great place to leave your dog for daycare or an overnight stay, but they really set themselves apart with their spa services. They’ll bathe your dog with a variety of natural shampoos, clean their ears, and even trim their nails! It’s a first-class pampering for your four-legged friend.

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The INspiration List – Fashion Trends for Fall/Winter 2014 http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/style-fashion/inspiration-list-fashion-trends-fallwinter-2014/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/style-fashion/inspiration-list-fashion-trends-fallwinter-2014/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 18:14:35 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=120210 Once the extended Indian summer we experience here in the southern slice of heaven truly turns to fall, it’s time to start thinking about attire and accessories for the cooler temps ahead. What’s hot? Global references have inspired everything from clothing to jewelry. There are also plenty of repeat performances from seasons past. Here’s a […]

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Once the extended Indian summer we experience here in the southern slice of heaven truly turns to fall, it’s time to start thinking about attire and accessories for the cooler temps ahead. What’s hot? Global references have inspired everything from clothing to jewelry. There are also plenty of repeat performances from seasons past. Here’s a list of fall fashion finds to fill your wardrobe for work, date night and everything in between:

Plaid Tartan-Tastic – Plaid for fall may not be the most original concept. The perennial checkered trend isn’t going anywhere this year, but we don’t mind. Coats, pants, skirts, shirts or dresses—there’s a plaid option out there for everyone.

Oversized – Most people like the idea of the oversize trend sticking around for fall, mainly because it’s the best way to hide an extra few pounds. All hail bigger sweaters, pants, and coats for these reasons: casual, comfy, cozy and chic.

Fringe Frenzy – You can find it from head to toe. My Favorite way to wear fringe for fall is with one statement piece. Make it your purse, a pair of boots, jewelry or a cape.

kristin2kristin3

Shades of Gray – From pearl to stormy, when black and white feel overdone, try the hue that’s a happy medium of both. Gray was styled from head to toe on the runway, but for everyday wear, add a jolt of cheeriness to the subdued shade with rich violets, vibrant greens, and bright yellows.

Orange is The New Black – This fiery hue has been spotted all over clothes, bags and shoes. But before you say “not for me,” know that there are different shades for every skin tone—from juicy, bold brights to subdued, muted hues.

Blue Hue – From light periwinkle to deep sapphire, it would seem that designers had the “blues” this season. For a modern take on the color trend, wear your favorite shade from top to bottom, or mix a few and go the color-block route. Tar Heel fashionistas, bring on the Carolina blue!

Renaissance & Baroque – Think jewelry such as pendant earrings, bonbon bracelets, statement rings, cuffs and necklaces.

Fur Real– Fabulously faux fur is pretty inevitable for fall fashion. Also pull out the shearling. Nothing protects you from a relentless polar vortex quite like shearling. Presented on vests, bomber jackets, collars, and even booties, shearling has proved to be the most essential of cold-weather necessities this season.

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In downtown Chapel Hill at Sugarland, I stumbled upon these four fashionistas all incorporating fall 2014 trends into their looks:

  • Designers have declared sneakers as the footwear of the moment. See sneakers above on second fashionista from the left.
  • This season, designers also took a walk on the wild side, incorporating animal motifs into their collections. See the black cat print skirt above on the far right. Perfect for Halloween! Plus a jacket, which is a great idea for taking summer clothes into fall.
  • Orange is the new black. Check it out in the pants on the far left and some of the tops above.
  • Tights, especially ones with boots, are great for transitioning summer wear into cooler temps. Check out the perfect summer to fall transition example above. Shorts with tights and boots plus orange is sported on the third fashionista from the left.

 

Share your fall faves and winter wardrobe starting lineup with Chapelboro Insiders in the comments below.

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Best of the Fest: What to See at the 2014 Carrboro Film Festival http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/best-fest-see-2014-carrboro-film-festival/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/best-fest-see-2014-carrboro-film-festival/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 10:00:43 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=118927 A Carrboro tradition returns this weekend with some exciting new additions. The 9th annual Carrboro Film Festival takes place on November 22nd and 23rd, and it’s back once again at the Century Center after last year’s split into two venues. However, this year will see some fun new features for cinephiles – and best of all, they’re free. Scary movie buffs […]

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A Carrboro tradition returns this weekend with some exciting new additions. The 9th annual Carrboro Film Festival takes place on November 22nd and 23rd, and it’s back once again at the Century Center after last year’s split into two venues. However, this year will see some fun new features for cinephiles – and best of all, they’re free.

Scary movie buffs will love the all-new “Block of Horror,” a chilly Saturday night triple bill of two short films and a feature that are sure to send a shiver down your spine. Those interested in the technical aspects of filmmaking can partake in two free workshops with established filmmakers. The first, kicking off the festival from 10 – 11:30 am on Saturday, will show how to capture footage with drone technology. The second, running Saturday afternoon from 2 – 3:15 pm, will cover the process of making a movie with acclaimed filmmaker Jon Kasbe.

Film festival coordinator Nic Beery says Kasbe’s workshop is what’s exciting him the most about this year’s festival. “Jon’s films have been honored by President Obama and it’s easy to see why – they are stunning and moving,” he says. “He is also bringing some musical friends Saturday night, so bring your dancing shoes!”

The festival will show films separated into blocks, with Q&As with filmmakers following each block. And it’ll wrap up with an after-party at Open Eye Cafe, open to the public, beginning Sunday at 7:45. Tickets are on sale now, and run only $18 for both days of films.

“I think Orange County loves the film festival because it features films that are independent, edgy and incredible,” says Beery. “These are films you won’t see at the multiplex and that are so under-served. It is our honor to shine as bright a light on them as we can each November in Carrboro. In addition, many of the filmmakers show up and answer the audience’s questions, and that adds so much to the festival. It really is a magical weekend.”

Beery says it’s impossible to narrow down the best films of the weekend, but he’s provided a preview of films from five different genres:

Bombshell (Film Block #8 – Sunday, 5:30pm – 7:30pm)

BOMBSHELL

“A lesbian film that is universal. Brother and sister get involved with a couple bullies. Sister takes charge, and the surprise ending is a winner.”

Mipso in Japan (Film Block #3 – Saturday, 7:00pm – 8:30pm)

Mipso in Japan

“Jon Kasbe’s film about the bluegrass band Mipso. A reviewer recently called it a ‘masterpiece’ and I agree.”

Talking Carl Talks Too Much (Film Block # 2 – Saturday, 3:30pm – 5:15pm)

TalkingCarlTalksTooMuch

“Wow. A short comedy that is so different and irreverent. Jason Dec from LA made this, and it stars the actor who plays Jerry in Parks and Rec.”

Pieces of Talent (Film Block # 4 – Saturday, 9:00pm – 11:30pm)

PiecesOfTalent

“One of our horror films during the FREE Saturday night block. Joe Stauffer from Fuquay-Varina made this film, and it is doing very well on the festival circuit. I don’t usually like horror films, but this one hooked me. Two of the lead actors will be in attendance.”

Christiania – 40 Years of Occupation (Film Block # 1 – Saturday, 12:00pm – 1:45pm)

Christiania

“This film tells the story of a 40-year-old squatter community occupying an abandoned military base in the center of Copenhagen, Denmark. This film should resonate with many in our community, and we are proud to present it.”

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UNC Academics Scandal Painful Hit For College Sports Loyalists http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/opinion/unc-academics-scandal-painful-hit-college-sports-loyalists/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/opinion/unc-academics-scandal-painful-hit-college-sports-loyalists/#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 10:00:17 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=119563 My relationship with North Carolina goes back to Dec. 13, 1966, when I covered the Tar Heels' 64-55 victory over Kentucky in Lexington's Memorial Coliseum. At that time, the young Carolina coach Dean Smith wasn't far removed from the days when he was being hung in effigy on the Chapel Hill campus. I wrote a game story that complimented Carolina's execution of Smith's ball-control game plan – a "Picasso," I called it – and Smith never forgot it.

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This content first appeared on WAVE3.com.

My relationship with North Carolina goes back to Dec. 13, 1966, when I covered the Tar Heels’ 64-55 victory over Kentucky in Lexington’s Memorial Coliseum. At that time, the young Carolina coach Dean Smith wasn’t far removed from the days when he was being hung in effigy on the Chapel Hill campus. I wrote a game story that complimented Carolina’s execution of Smith’s ball-control game plan – a “Picasso,” I called it – and Smith never forgot it.

Over the next 30 years, whenever he and I crossed paths, Smith mentioned that 1966 story. He said it came when he needed a pat on the back. He had been under fire in Chapel Hill for not being the popular Frank McGuire, who had coached the 1956-57 Heels to a 32-0 record and an historic triple-overtime win over Kansas and Wilt Chamberlain in the NCAA title game.

Dean SmithUsing the victory over UK as an early-season impetus, the Tar Heels went on to earn Smith a berth in the 1967 Final Four in Louisville’s Freedom Hall. I was assigned to cover the team’s arrival at Standiford Field. When the players disembarked, waving small Confederate flags, nobody thought it amounted to any more than regional pride. (Nevertheless, Dean didn’t like it when I mentioned it years later.)

Dayton upset the Tar Heels in the 1967 semifinals, sparing UNC the agony of playing Lew Alcindor’s unbeaten UCLA team, but Smith had turned the corner. Over the next 30 years, he made 26 more NCAA trips, won two national titles (1982 and 1993) and essentially built a new model for college basketball programs.

Under Smith, no player – even one as gifted as Michael Jordan – was bigger than the system. He emphasized academics, building an outstanding graduation rate, and was committed to compliance with the NCAA. He introduced the “Four Corners” delay game that eventually forced the NCAA to adopt a shot clock. No detail was too small to escape his micro-management.

Whenever I’d get into an argument about cheating, I’d always cite North Carolina as Exhibit A of a highly successful program that did things the right way. My list also included Duke, Stanford, Wisconsin, Notre Dame, Louisville, Indiana, Michigan State and a few others. But North Carolina was the rock. Whenever a radio caller would insist that everybody cheats, North Carolina was my go-to program for proof that he (or she) was wrong.

But today I’m devastated. I feel betrayed. Never in my wildest dreams could I envision the mother of all academic scandals happening at North Carolina. But the facts are as indisputable as they are mind-boggling. For almost 20 years, going back to the end of Smith’s hallowed era, the university offered a bogus course in African-American Studies that was taken by many student-athletes.

I believed in Carolina’s academic integrity so strongly that I didn’t pay much attention in 2011, when the Raleigh News & Observer began to report about widespread academic fraud at UNC. However, Rashad McCants, the second-leading scorer on Carolina’s 2005 NCAA championship team, definitely got my attention when he told ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” that tutors wrote his term papers, that he rarely went to class for about half his time in college and that he remained eligible to play largely because of phony classes.

Furthermore, McCants said Carolina coach Roy Williams knew about the bogus class system that had been in place for years, an allegation that Williams immediately and repeatedly denied. Nevertheless, UNC hired former federal prosecutor Kenneth Wainstein to conduct an independent investigation into past irregularities in academics relating to athletes.

The results of the Wainstein investigation were devastating to the university and its image. In a detailed, 131-page report, Wainstein confirmed that at least 3,100 students, many of them scholarship athletes, were guilty of academic fraud that was tacitly sanctioned by university administrators.

Sadly, but predictably, some Carolina haters engaged in schadenfreude of the worst kind. Tired of what they perceived as a holier-than-thou attitude at UNC, they took great delight in Carolina’s fall from grace. They demanded that titles be vacated, victories forfeited and monies returned. They felt the NCAA should impose Draconian sanctions against UNC that were every bit as tough as the ones levied against Penn State following the Jerry Sandusky child-abuse scandal.

They may get their wishes. Academic fraud of the kind that existed at Carolina goes to the heart of an institution’s mission and integrity. It is just about the worst scandal of its kind in NCAA history. And the fact that it happened in Chapel Hill hurts more than just the university and its athletics programs. It hurts everyone in college athletics who is fighting against corruption at all levels. This was a massive blow to everyone who believes, however naively, in the concept of the level playing field.

Carolina is hardly the first or the only school to compromise its academic standards to accommodate gifted athletes who have no business being in college. Every university has courses and majors that are conducive to keeping athletes eligible to play and make money for the university. But UNC took this distasteful reality to a new level.

As academic watchdog Gerald Gurney told CNN, “I can safely say that the scope of the 20-year UNC fraud scandal easily takes the prize for the largest and most nefarious scandal in the history of NCAA enforcement. The depth and breadth of the scheme – involving counselors, coaches, academic and athletic administrators, faculty, etc. – eclipses any previous scandal.”

I can’t help but feel badly for my old friend Dean Smith. I also grieve for all the marvelous student-athletes who have come through the Tar Heel program. Almost all of them got their degrees and became productive members of society. I remember how neat I thought it was when Jordan, who left UNC after three years, came back to get his degree.

Despite this incredible jolt, I refuse to concede that everybody in big-time college basketball is cheating. Because if I ever believed that, I would have to stop following the game at that level. After all, what would it say about the integrity of any of us if we supported an endeavor we believed was totally corrupt?

All we can do is continue to fight the good fight. We must seek out and celebrate the good guys while also weeding out and condemning the cheaters. Just because the battle is tougher now than it was before the UNC bombshell, it does not mean that it’s no longer worth fighting.

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Short List Voting: Best Place For Pets http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-voting-best-place-pets/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/short-list-lifestyle/short-list-voting-best-place-pets/#comments Thu, 13 Nov 2014 17:11:54 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=118885 Plenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose? Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in YOUR […]

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short list winners

Plenty of sites and publications offer “best of” lists and top ten awards, but how many let YOU vote on the best businesses and locations around your town? After all, it is YOUR town. Who else is more qualified to choose?

Chapelboro.com’s Short List is a monthly award decided entirely by the readers and residents in YOUR community. We’ve been collecting your submissions for the month of November for “Best Place For Pets,” and now it’s time to vote on the top spots! We’ll announce the winner on Thursday, November 27th! The voting period goes from November 13th to the 26th.

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Real Food Meets Real Life http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/food-dining/real-food-real-life/ http://chapelboro.com/lifestyle/food-dining/real-food-real-life/#comments Thu, 13 Nov 2014 10:00:08 +0000 http://chapelboro.com/?p=118715 Years ago, I read M.F.K. Fisher’s seminal work The Art of Eating. Her prose about food and the crucial importance of social eating was hypnotic. It was one of my first exposures to sophisticated food writing, one that made me feel at once inspired to step up my cooking game, and guilty that I sometimes […]

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fisherYears ago, I read M.F.K. Fisher’s seminal work The Art of Eating. Her prose about food and the crucial importance of social eating was hypnotic. It was one of my first exposures to sophisticated food writing, one that made me feel at once inspired to step up my cooking game, and guilty that I sometimes ate cereal over the sink for breakfast. (Fisher, I am sure, ate eggs from egg cups and always used cloth napkins while enjoying fresh flowers atop a well-lit breakfast table.) The Art of Eating celebrates the visual and tactile components of food, describing meals not just as nutrition but as works of gastronomic art necessary for the health of the human soul. It was M.F.K Fisher who once described an afternoon picnic with her parents in which they cut a whole pie into thirds (thirds!) and spooned it over with cream, as “one of the best meals we ever ate.”

I can’t imagine how fast and hard I would have to guilt-exercise to feel good about a meal like that.

My husband and I recently watched the documentary Food, Inc. (I know, we’re behind the times) and in my disgust over what can only be a 21st century version of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, I started thinking again about M.F.K. Fisher. Fisher cooked with whole milk and lots of butter, used real sugar when baking cakes, ate pasture-raised meat, and, above all, felt that to share a good meal with loved ones was a form of social communion that transcended life’s mundane troubles. (These are the people who can eat a third of a pie with cream and remember it with pleasure forever.)

Mindful eating of whole, unprocessed ingredients is nothing new – it is a food philosophy that has been around as long as the American government has been regulating food and farms with the intent of establishing a tighter control over public health. The Jungle was one of the first published works to shed light on America’s meat packing facilities, their marginalization of certain ethnic groups, and their gut-churning, unsanitary conditions. The exposé, of a meat packing plant in Chicago, led to the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act, the first federal reform of consumer protection laws, which in turn led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration. So public concern about what goes into our food has been alive and well throughout modern American history; it’s only been in the past couple of decades that such concern has taken a more pronounced and approachable direction, with a focus on local, fresh, and minimally-processed food production.

Our society is richer for its newfound focus on local food, I believe, and perhaps this new wave of public concern about food production will lead to some positive changes in the kinds of things that appear on our grocery shelves. In the past several weeks at my house, we have been using real ingredients, shunning low-fat creams, butters, and dairy products; roasting vegetables and drinking green smoothies; and using whole wheat flour and natural sweeteners as often as possible. But in the hectic and heady everyday, the reality is this: I do make a gorgeous pot of tomato bisque and quesadillas with homemade, whole-wheat tortillas, only to retreat to the upstairs family room to eat while watching Jeopardy. Crumbs in the family room are as much a part of life right now as cooking with local bacon. It is then that my thoughts return to M.F.K. Fisher – are we nourished by food alone, or is it sharing food with other people that nourishes us? Is this practice about the body or the soul? Can it be both?

Because, really, The Art of Eating describes eating and cooking under semi-ideal life conditions. So what about the art of eating when stressed? Sleep-deprived? Discouraged? Sick? After all, humans can’t function on an even keel all the time. We have complex days and complex feelings, and so often meals are a reflection of those feelings. I mean, God forbid, we sometimes have to order out. So for the time being, using real ingredients, even if we eat those wholesome meals in front of the television, is a major win. I feel like we have plenty of time in the future for those family-table meals with sophisticated children who eat pumpkin risotto and talk about art and music and sports, Jeopardy nowhere in sight (or at least recorded for later). That’s the hope, at least.

As Michael Pollan famously says in his In Defense of Real Food, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” It is a resounding encouragement to those of us who want to eat whole and local. Unlike Fisher, Pollan doesn’t romanticize the act of social eating, but rather looks at food from a more practical standpoint. And really, we need both perspectives – an understanding that eating cereal over the sink doesn’t quite nourish to the fullest extent, and perhaps a resolution to eat oatmeal instead, with full knowledge of and better control over its ingredients.

The next step in this process is rediscovering Chapel Hill’s supermarket alternatives – sources for local meat, co-ops, and farmers’ markets. Good eating is a journey and a lifelong practice, but how lucky we are to live in a place with so many possibilities! So we’re getting there, and bringing our family with us. I’ll let you know how it goes.

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