Steph Beckett

Local Businesses Close for Day Without Immigrants

Most sunny weekday afternoons you can find Merritt’s Store and Grill in Chapel Hill packed with hungry customers with hankerings for a BLT. But Thursday, instead of bustling, all you could hear was a car or two whizzing past on Columbia Street. Merritt’s was silent and its doors were closed. All for a national strike, also known as A Day Without Immigrants. UNC grad student Molly Figueroa drove to Merritt’s to meet a friend, and didn’t realize the business would be closed. She said she hadn’t experienced any other closings yet that day. “This is the first thing I’ve...

Read More

Joint Program to Help Lateral-Entry Teachers in the Classroom

Amid teacher shortages statewide, UNC and NC State are helping “lateral-entry teachers” get their teaching licenses while gaining hands-on experience in the classroom. “My colleagues and NC State and my colleagues at Carolina saw that there’s this great need to have a positive impact in the field immediately through lateral teacher preparation, so we wanted to bring the program to them,” said Diana Lys, Assistant Dean for Education Preparation Programs and Accreditation at UNC. “I think that’s what’s ideal here is we’re going to meet the needs with those lateral entry teachers where they are right now in the...

Read More

OWASA Working to Keep Community Informed After Water Crisis

Some Chapel Hill and Carrboro residents are still recovering after the water crisis on February 3 and 4 that left all without running water during the affected time. An accidental overfeed of fluoride in the water at the Orange Water and Sewer Authority Plant caused the initial issue on February 2. OWASA began receiving water from the City of Durham at that time to continue supplying customers with high-quality drinking water. OWASA had also asked customers to try and conserve as much water as possible. The next morning, a major water main break occurred in northeast Chapel Hill. OWASA...

Read More

UNC’s Hill Hall Gets New Look

Hill Hall has been a part of UNC’s campus since 1907. But it’s been closed off for renovations for over a year—until now. The university held a ribbon-cutting Wednesday to kick-off and show off the one-hundred-and-ten-year-old building’s new look. “The biggest change would have been that the stage itself—you had to walk up to the stage, there was no handicap accessibility,” said Louise Toppin, Chair of the Department of Music at UNC. “So, there were steps in the back and steps in the front. And that meant, it wasn’t something that our handicapped students or guests could actually get...

Read More

NC NAACP Units Prepare for HKonJ

Every February since 2006, the different units of the NC NAACP gather with other NC organizations to form the Historic Thousands on Jones Street, or HKonJ. HKonJ is an event in Raleigh that consists of a rally and march for different issues of social justice, ending at the State Capitol downtown. “It’s important that we stand for what we believe in our own town,” said Anna Richards, president of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro unit of the NAACP. “That’s where the action really happens.” Richards said this year the main issues the event will focus on are voting rights, education equality, economic stability, equal...

Read More

State Legislature to Consider Shrinking UNC BoG

****UPDATE: The North Carolina House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed House Bill 39 on Wednesday. It now awaits action in the state Senate.**** As it stands now, the UNC System Board of Governors comprises 32 members. But if a new bill passes, that number will shrink to 24 by mid-2019. The North Carolina Senate and House of Representatives appoint new board members every two years. In 2015 and before, they appointed 16 new members. But if House Bill 39 passes, in 2017 they will appoint 12. “We believe that by decreasing the total number of people, you will actually get...

Read More

Congressmen Advocate for Light Rail Progress

GoTriangle is continuing to work with local and state officials to make the Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit Project a reality. The organization hosted a tour Monday of the project corridor for congressmen David Price and G.K. Butterfield, along with other local officials. The corridor included the added stop at North Carolina Central University. Butterfield said making the light rail connector a reality will help make traveling and commuting easier for all residents of Durham and Orange counties. “The individuals who are leading this effort are transportation professionals who understand the importance of light rail and what it will do...

Read More

University, Community Leaders Spark Conversation About Immigration Policy

UNC and the Town of Chapel Hill are creating dialogue surrounding President Donald Trump’s executive order: prohibiting residents from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia and Libya from traveling to the US. University and community leaders gathered at the Student Union Wednesday evening to discuss this executive order and two others he signed at the end of January. “I think most immigration lawyers are telling clients, ‘Do not travel,'” said Lynn Calder, UNC professor and immigration attorney. “Just don’t travel outside the country for awhile. No matter who you are. If you’re not a citizen, look at your specific circumstances...

Read More

Advocates Hopeful for Continued Fight Against AIDS Under New Administration

There are more than 56,000 new cases of HIV infection each year in the country. But the Office of National AIDS Policy is trying to change that. It was originally created under President Bill Clinton’s administration to respond to the AIDS epidemic during the 1990s. But former President Barack Obama released a national strategy in 2010 to continue to work on bringing that number down. Lee Storrow is the Executive Director of the North Carolina AIDS Action Network. He said he hopes President Donald Trump continues to work on the national strategy under his administration. “One hope that I...

Read More

Mayors: Chapel Hill, Carrboro Not Affected by Executive Order on Sanctuary Cities

Both Chapel Hill and Carrboro apply for federal grants each year that could allow the towns to expand, create and make life better for residents. But after Trump signed an executive order limiting federal money that sanctuary cities are eligible for, it left questions of which cities and towns those are. Chapel Hill Mayor Pam Hemminger said Chapel Hill is still eligible to apply for federal grants, because it isn’t technically a registered sanctuary city. She said instead, the town has a community value that includes inclusivity. “As far as I know, we’re not applying for grants that require...

Read More
Translate »