Steph Beckett

‘Color the Hill’ 4K to Benefit Local Non-Profits

The Color the Hill 4K and fun run is kicking off its fifth year of blitzing runners with cornstarch powder as they complete the course. Color the Hill is open to anyone from kids to the elderly and there is no time limit on completion. Funds from this year’s CTH will benefit the Be Loud! Sophie Foundation, the Academy of Information Technology for CHCCS and the SKJAJA Fund. Jill Daly is the co-president of the SKJAJA Club at East Chapel Hill High School. The fund helps children in lower income homes participate in extracurricular activities, but also encourages these children to...

Read More

CHCCS Moving Forward with Equity Plan

CHCCS has been developing an equity plan for its schools for over a year. The plan was originally designed to address racial inequity, but has since been revamped to include other types of inequality such as gender and nationality. “So if we look at what colleges and universities are really doing, this actually affects all of us, not just one person, but every single one of us—that they’re preparing teachers to teach primarily English-speaking white students who come from a middle class, two-parent, heterosexual, Protestant Christian home,” said Sheldon Lanier, Director of Equity Leadership for CHCCS. “So if you...

Read More

‘Hear Our Voices’ Project Gives Voices to Marginalized Groups

Artwork, videos, interview transcriptions and photography were all included in Hear Our Voices: an interactive presentation by students at the UNC School of Social Work. Part of getting a degree from the school includes understanding how to relate to people who are different than you. This is what Doctor Iris Carlton-LaNay’s class had in mind when developing the project for their “Confronting Oppression and Institutionalized Discrimination” class. The students interviewed different people from marginalized groups for the project. They incorporated several types of media to allow those they interviewed to share experiences about the political climate, personal struggles and...

Read More

Local Organization Studies Gap in NC Public School Funding

On average, Orange County spends almost $5,000 on each student in its school systems. This is over $3,000 more than the average county spends on each student, and over $4,000 more than the poorest, Swain County spends on each student. That’s what the Public School Forum of North Carolina found out in its latest study. “That plays out across North Carolina where you’ve got counties like Orange, like Durham, like Wake County, Guilford County, Mecklenburg County,” said Keith Poston, President and Executive Director of the Public School Forum of NC. “The urban cities have a lot more resources available for their schools....

Read More

UNC Horizons Opens New Facility

UNC Horizons is an internationally-recognized program that treats women who are pregnant, and women who are parents for substance use disorders. The program was formed as an extension of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, but it now has a Carrboro location all of its own. “The children we care for will finally have the rooms and playground to match all the wonderful things that we see happen in their lives,” said Dr. John M. Thorp Jr. “Learners and investigators from across campus will come here and realize this highly prevalent and lethal disease is equally worthy of their...

Read More

‘Queen of Katwe’ Author Featured at Chapel Hill Public Library

Tim Crothers is a UNC professor and sportswriter. He’s a former senior writer for Sports Illustrated. He’s written a book on Roy Williams. He’s written a book on UNC women’s soccer coach Anson Dorrance. But he’s mostly known as the author of “The Queen of Katwe.” It’s a book about a Ugandan girl named Phiona Mutesi who learns to play chess, and finds out she’s talented. She then begins to succeed in so many competitions that she dreams to become a grandmaster, or a highest-class chess champion. Crothers said someone pitched him the story idea because they’d heard about...

Read More

‘Whirligig Woods’ Theme Park Planned for Saxapahaw

Bob Baranick is no rookie to theme park designing. “My focus was Disneyland California—I also worked on Epcot,” he said. “Disneyland Paris was one of my passion projects. Busch Gardens, Williamsburg; Busch Gardens, Tampa; Six Flags, Georgia; Hershey, Pennsylvania. And then various projects across the world.” But he said he wanted to branch out and create theme parks of his own. He’s from California, but loves North Carolina because that’s where his wife and art director Carol Wood, is from. Baranick said he and Wood chose Saxapahaw as the spot for a new park they’re working on, Whirligig Woods,...

Read More

Defendants Added to Chandler Kania Civil Lawsuit

UNC student Chandler Kania was convicted of killing three people – Darlene McGee, Felicia Harris King and six-year-old Jahnice Beard – while driving drunk in 2015. Kania was driving the wrong way on I-85 when he hit their car head-on. Families of those killed filed a civil lawsuit on top of the criminal charges against Kania. The lawsuit included his parents and two bars accused of selling an underage Kania alcohol the night of the crash: He’s Not Here and La Residence. Kania’s parents and He’s Not Here have already settled out of court, according to documents. In Kania’s...

Read More

YouthWorx Creates Space for Youth-Serving Nonprofits

YouthWorx on Main is a brand-new youth-serving nonprofit collaborative that will live on Main Street in Carrboro, adjacent to the PTA Thrift Shop. The thrift shop and Youth Forward worked together to form YouthWorx and give other local nonprofits a place to work. “We talk about co-housing, we talk about co-working with adults,” said Carrboro Mayor Lydia Lavelle. “Why not have collaborative services where nonprofits for youth share space? It’s really imaginative and I think it’s very cutting-edge, especially with a youth angle.” Lavelle attended a ribbon-cutting Tuesday to kick-off Youthworx in its new space. PTA Thrift shop staff and...

Read More

UNC System Targeted in Senate Immigration Bill

North Carolina operates under a law that prohibits any county or municipality from restricting local law enforcement’s ability to cooperate with federal immigration officials. Therefore, there are no technical sanctuary cities in the state. However, local law enforcement officials choose what to prioritize in their respective towns. But Senate Bill 145 is moving through the General Assembly, that aims to keep North Carolina operating under this law. The bill is similar to one that was filed last month, that aimed to remove city street funding and sales taxes on video programming from counties that don’t comply. It also aimed...

Read More
Translate »