Aleta Donald

Hiking Guide

The Chapel Hill area offers many lovely spots for walking, hiking, and outdoor recreation. Read on for a composition of the nicest and most convenient areas for these activities. Duke Forest New Hope Creek Duke Forest occupies over 7,000 acres of land in central North Carolina and has been used for teaching and research purposes for decades. Its lovely trails are open to the public, and many of them are accessible from Erwin or Sunrise Road in Durham and eastern Chapel Hill. A particularly beautiful trail follows the New Hope Creek for over a mile, winding through the woods with...

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Humans of Chapelboro: Tamara Schenck (part two)

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro continues Tamara Schenck’s story. Schenck was born in the Ukraine before she and her family immigrated to the United States in 1952. She later worked as a model and lived all over the world with her husband, a foreign service officer. Read part one here.  “Every posting had its real advantages and disadvantages. Hong Kong was like a big toy store. Life was so good there, we had servants. The Hong Kong island is about 40 miles all around. It’s tiny. We had Morris Mini cars, and we could go to the beach. It was great....

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Humans of Chapelboro: a life filled with travel, beginning in Ukraine

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro features Tamara Schenck, who was born in the Ukraine before she and her family immigrated to the United States in 1952. She later worked as a model and lived all over the world with her husband, a foreign service officer.  “I was born in the Ukraine in a very small village. My father worked at a alcohol distillery. Then we moved from there to a bigger city when I was a couple of months old. This was during the early Stalin years. The Soviets were really…playing hardball in the area. The big famine had...

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Humans of Chapelboro: the value of international connections

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro features Dr. Bobbie Lubker, a retired professor of Education and Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Lubker has spent her life so far working in speech pathology, public health and education, and welcoming international scholars into her home. Read part one of her story here.  “My father was a rotarian at the Rotary Club, which has international scholarships that are as highly valued by some as Rhodes Scholars. These young people from all over the world will come into a community and live with families. So my dad came home...

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“Day Without A Woman” Fundraisers Planned Throughout Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools have already declared an optional teacher workday for Wednesday, March 8, on which an international women’s strike, called “A Day Without a Woman” is planned. Local high school students have turned their day off into action, planning bake sales throughout Chapel Hill to benefit Planned Parenthood, Homestart, the Compass Center, and the Orange Country Rape Crisis Center. Booths with baked goods will be located in front of the Varsity Theatre on Franklin Street, in front of the store Rumors (106 N Graham St), and at the Chapel Hill Public Library from 11 a.m. to 5...

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Humans of Chapelboro: Dr. Bobbie Lubker

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro features Dr. Bobbie Lubker, a retired professor of Education and Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Lubker has spent her life so far working in speech pathology, public health and education, and welcoming international scholars into her home.  “Even though Chapel Hill is in the South, I often find myself the only Southerner in the group. I was born in Kentucky, and then we moved to Georgia and then to Alabama. I often tell people that I did all the growing up I planned to do in Alabama. I graduated...

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Humans of Chapelboro: Race, politics, and purpose on Facebook Live

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro continues the story of Kevin “Kaze” Thomas and Bishop Omega, who host a weekly web show, Intelligently Ratchet. Read part 1 of their story here.  Kaze:  There’s a diversity of opinion. We’re just two brothers sitting up there talking about politics and world events, and then talking about what new Kendrick Lamar album just came out. That is something that appeals to me and to a lot of people—the diversity. Intelligently Ratchet is not just a show for black people, it’s a show for everybody. I feel like we’re setting an example that it’s cool to be...

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Humans of Chapelboro: the creators of an innovative web series

Kevin “Kaze” Thomas and Bishop Omega host their web show, Intelligently Ratchet, each week on Facebook Live. WCHL/Chapelboro interviewed them about their show and their creative process.  Kaze: I attended UNC-Chapel Hill. I came in with the intentions of being a political science or criminal justice major, or going into entertainment and rap. It’s crazy the extreme that I had. I ended up going the way of entertainment, the arts, and I studied radio, television, and film at Carolina. I did music and television for sometime, and I’ve done things at NBC. I worked for NBC for the last...

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Humans of Chapelboro: Rediscovering long-lost family

This week’s “Humans of Chapelboro” continues the story of Ruth Ann and George Groh. Read part 1 here and part 2 here.  Ruth Ann: We had one more piece of evidence with us–an old postcard that Emile Jung had sent to his daughter. It showed a tiny place called Sparsbrod, and a building that was a restaurant. We walked into Sparsbrod, and lo and behold, we recognized the same building that was pictured on this 1925 postcard! George: It was an old black and white faded postcard. It wasn’t a restaurant any more, but all the lines and gables...

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Humans of Chapelboro: An illuminating trip to France

This week’s Humans of Chapelboro continues the story of George and Ruth Ann Groh of Chapel Hill. See the first post about them here.  Ruth Ann: George’s grandfather, Emile Jung, emigrated to Boston from Eastern France in the 1890’s, leaving behind a whole family with many brothers. But after George’s mother, Rosalie, died in 1967, there was no one to ask about the French family. We had time to travel and to sort things out after our children had grown up. I found a travel diary from a trip to France that George’s mother had gone on with her...

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